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Re: Kasutera/Castela - a Portuguese sweet bread from 16th c. Japan

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  • LJonthebay
    ... Modern kasutera yes. The recipe cited above is in a document dated 1641 CE. No milk, no honey, no fancy shmancy whisking. ;-D Both batches vanished
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 1, 2012
      --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "SeanM" <srmalloy@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "LJonthebay" <wodeford@> wrote:
      > > Rath's translation is of a recipe for kasutera (Pao de Castela or Bread from Castile) that dates to 1641, however, the treat was known during our period.
      > >
      > > "Knead together 10 eggs, 160 momme (600 grams or 2.5 cups*) of
      > > sugar and 160 momme of wheat flour. Spread paper in a pot and
      > > sprinkle it with flour. Place the dough on top of this. Place a
      > > heat source above and below to cook. There are oral instructions."
      > > from the Nanban Ryorisho or Southern Barbarian's Cookbook, which
      > > dates from 1641.

      > From a little rummaging around the Net, it appears that it's _supposed_ to be a batter; it's one of the many variations on sponge cake (or pound cake), which depend for their rise on the expansion of the air trapped in the batter.

      Modern kasutera yes. The recipe cited above is in a document dated 1641 CE. No milk, no honey, no fancy shmancy whisking. ;-D Both batches vanished mysteriously into hungry faces at Estrella War with no complaints.

      Saionji Shonagon
      West Kingdom
    • LJonthebay
      Looks like nobody s looked at my original thread on the Tousando about this, so I m posting it again. (It includes description of modern kasutera, etc.)
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 2, 2012
        Looks like nobody's looked at my original thread on the Tousando about this, so I'm posting it again. (It includes description of modern kasutera, etc.)

        http://tousando.proboards.com/index.cgi?action=display&board=food&thread=4023&page=1

        Batches 2(made with 7 eggs) and 3 (6 eggs) were cheerfully consumed at Estrella War this week. In a discussion with one of my victims, we conjectured that the consistency would have worked well for a ship bread, which makes a great deal of sense when one thinks about how many months a voyage from Portugal to the Far East took. After a couple of days in a zip-lock bag in the Arizona desert (a climate FAR drier than Japan ever gets), the texture somewhat resembled biscotti.

        Saionji Shonagon, sugaring up the Known World for at least a week.
        West Kingdom
      • Solveig Throndardottir
        Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... The fancy whisking could be in the oral instructions. Given a culture of knife ceremonies, fancy whisking would not
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 2, 2012
          Noble Cousin!

          Greetings from Solveig!
          > Modern kasutera yes. The recipe cited above is in a document dated 1641 CE. No milk, no honey, no fancy shmancy whisking. ;-D Both batches vanished mysteriously into hungry faces at Estrella War with no complaints.
          The fancy whisking could be in the oral instructions. Given a culture of knife ceremonies, fancy whisking would not be surprising.

          Your Humble Servant
          Solveig Throndardottir
          Amateur Scholar



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • LJonthebay
          ... Rath describes this as a flat, pancake-like bread. Whisking aerates the eggs and to my mind, makes sense for a cake batter, less for a bread dough. I fully
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 2, 2012
            --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...> wrote:

            > The fancy whisking could be in the oral instructions. Given a culture of knife ceremonies, fancy whisking would not be surprising.

            Rath describes this as a flat, pancake-like bread. Whisking aerates the eggs and to my mind, makes sense for a cake batter, less for a bread dough.

            I fully intend to pester one of our cooking Laurels if I see her this weekend because I would LOVE to find a Portuguese or Spanish source for comparison.

            Saionji Shonagon
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