Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SCA-JML] Could someone help me identify these "pants"?

Expand Messages
  • Pia Lampert
    Ah ok now I see clearer =). Thanks to all and for the description. As soon as I get another Hakama I will try it myself.  Pia ________________________________
    Message 1 of 14 , Mar 24 4:59 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Ah ok now I see clearer =). Thanks to all and for the description.
      As soon as I get another Hakama I will try it myself. 


      Pia


      ________________________________
      Von: Ishiyama Gen'tarou Yori'ie <ishiyama@...>
      An: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
      Gesendet: 22:48 Freitag, 23.März 2012
      Betreff: Re: [SCA-JML] Could someone help me identify these "pants"?


       
      Eileen Young wrote:
      > Is the hat in the picture a man's hat or a hat that everyone wore?

      The hat is a "sando gasa", and is appropriate for townfolk and
      travellers, though I would actually be hard pressed to document it
      as truly period for either gender.

      In the SCA, it is commonly worn by both men and women. It is most
      notable for being an actual Japanese hat, similar enough to
      documentable headwear to pass, and actually can be bought in North
      America (overseas shipping adds up, even on light items).

      Pia Lampert wrote:
      > How come that your Hakama aren't as full as the ones in the picture?
      > What makes the differences? Cloth? The way he tied up his Hakama?

      Logically speaking, clothing fullness is a function of wealth. That
      photo was taken at Pennsic, and I am dressed extremely informally
      as a commoner due to warm weather. He is obviously a highly-paid,
      skilled swordsman.

      Mechanically speaking, the hakama I am wearing in that picture only
      use three panels per leg (2 in front, 1 in back), and the panels are
      somewhat narrow. He probably has four panels per leg, and the panels
      look pretty wide. Period looms are anywhere from 14 to 16 inches wide.
      My panels might have been cut from 54" fabric, giving me 13.5 inch
      panels.

      Here's a museum picture showing a lower-class peddler -

      http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/fukusyoku/busou/26.htm

      Here's a picture showing a warrior -

      http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/fukusyoku/busou/15.htm

      > I am having a hard time trying to imagine how it works. Are there
      > any pictures or tutorials on how to do it? Where does the cord end
      > and is it hidden? So many questions =).

      For the blue hakama in my picture, I simply used the hem as a casing
      and ran a cord through it all the way around the leg opening. The
      cord enters and leaves at the outside seam. The cord is about two
      feet longer than the total circumference of the opening, so the legs
      can be completely opened and hang straight down.

      To use, I simply cross the cords and pull them tight, just like the
      top of a drawstring bag, position the gathers just below my knee,
      and tie the cords. Because of the amount of fabric, this is
      sometimes not as "simple" as I say, and takes some adjusting. You
      can imagine gathering the fabric by hand and tying it in place with
      a cord, but you might need somebody to help you with that. Some
      people tell me that instead of a separate cord, you can tie the
      gathered fabric in place with the kyahan, but I don't trust that to
      hold, and have never tried it.

      Whatever method you use, it's hidden no matter what because the
      fabric blouses out and down, covering whatever you do.

      --
      The Hon. Lord Ishiyama Gen'tarou Yori'ie
      (mka: Elliott C. "Eeyore" Evans)
      ishiyama@...



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jess
      It s funny that you mention those hakama, the movie those pictures are from is Red Sun with Toshiro Mifune and Charles Bronson. When I was making my husband s
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 26 6:46 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        It's funny that you mention those hakama, the movie those pictures are from is Red Sun with Toshiro Mifune and Charles Bronson. When I was making my husband's first set of Japanese garb he said he wanted pants like the ones Mifune wore in Red Sun. I searched the web, and every Japanese clothing book I could find, trying to figure out what kind of pants those were. I watched the movie several times, fast-forwarding to any scene where I could clearly see the pants and found a brief snippet of a scene that answered the question. They are normal hakama that he hitches up at the sides and tucks into his obi making them look like short, baggy, hakama. As soon as I read your subject line that movie popped into my head and I chuckled when I saw the pictures.

        Sanada Katsumi
      • Pia Lampert
        Heh, yeah same here. I stumbled across the movie and liked it at once. When I saw his pants I wanted to have them, but like you I had problems to figure out
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 26 10:47 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          Heh, yeah same here. I stumbled across the movie and liked it at once. When I saw his "pants" I wanted to have them, but like you I had problems to figure out what kind of pants Mifune is wearing.  Good to know that there are people out here with so much knowledge =)

          But how would you tuck your Hakama into your obi? Anyways I am going to do that as well. it looks really stylish. 

          Amaya



          ________________________________
          Von: Jess <slaoen@...>
          An: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
          Gesendet: 15:46 Montag, 26.März 2012
          Betreff: [SCA-JML] Re: Could someone help me identify these "pants"?


           
          It's funny that you mention those hakama, the movie those pictures are from is Red Sun with Toshiro Mifune and Charles Bronson. When I was making my husband's first set of Japanese garb he said he wanted pants like the ones Mifune wore in Red Sun. I searched the web, and every Japanese clothing book I could find, trying to figure out what kind of pants those were. I watched the movie several times, fast-forwarding to any scene where I could clearly see the pants and found a brief snippet of a scene that answered the question. They are normal hakama that he hitches up at the sides and tucks into his obi making them look like short, baggy, hakama. As soon as I read your subject line that movie popped into my head and I chuckled when I saw the pictures.

          Sanada Katsumi




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • LJonthebay
          ... You don t. The obi goes on underneath. Yes, really. Saionji Shonagon West Kingdom
          Message 4 of 14 , Mar 26 10:56 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Pia Lampert <ti1816@...> wrote:
            > But how would you tuck your Hakama into your obi?

            You don't. The obi goes on underneath. Yes, really.

            Saionji Shonagon
            West Kingdom
          • Ishiyama Gen'tarou Yori'ie
            ... I don t do this myself, but some people swear by it in hot weather. Just reach down in through the side openings of the hakama, grab the bottom hem, pull
            Message 5 of 14 , Mar 26 11:58 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              Pia Lampert wrote:
              > But how would you tuck your Hakama into your obi? Anyways I am going
              > to do that as well. it looks really stylish. 

              I don't do this myself, but some people swear by it in hot weather. Just reach down in through the side openings of the hakama, grab the bottom hem, pull it up, and tuck a corner of it up between the obi (or the hakama himo if you're not wearing an obi) and kosode.

              I guess you could do this at multiple points to even it out, but most people seem to do it just at either side.
              --
              The Hon. Lord Ishiyama Gen'tarou Yori'ie
              (m.k.a. Elliott C. "Eeyore" Evans)
              ishiyama@...
            • David Holt
              For a shortening of the legs somewhere between full length and pulling the bottom hem up to the belt, you can also grab the lowest point of the side cuts and
              Message 6 of 14 , Mar 27 6:46 AM
              • 0 Attachment
                For a shortening of the legs somewhere between full length and pulling the bottom hem up to the belt, you can also grab the lowest point of the side cuts and pull it up through the obi/himo. Both of the people in the foreground of this picture have done it: http://s163.photobucket.com/albums/t303/jdmcowan/?action=view¤t=DSCF2833.jpg

                To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                From: ishiyama@...
                Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2012 14:58:30 -0400
                Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Re: Could someone help me identify these "pants"?




























                Pia Lampert wrote:

                > But how would you tuck your Hakama into your obi? Anyways I am going

                > to do that as well. it looks really stylish.



                I don't do this myself, but some people swear by it in hot weather. Just reach down in through the side openings of the hakama, grab the bottom hem, pull it up, and tuck a corner of it up between the obi (or the hakama himo if you're not wearing an obi) and kosode.



                I guess you could do this at multiple points to even it out, but most people seem to do it just at either side.

                --

                The Hon. Lord Ishiyama Gen'tarou Yori'ie

                (m.k.a. Elliott C. "Eeyore" Evans)

                ishiyama@...



















                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Solveig Throndardottir
                Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... It s not exactly stylish. It is like rolling up your sleeves. It is part of a chambara cliche. The samurai going into
                Message 7 of 14 , Mar 28 9:31 AM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Noble Cousin!

                  Greetings from Solveig!

                  > But how would you tuck your Hakama into your obi? Anyways I am going to do that as well. it looks really stylish.

                  It's not exactly stylish. It is like rolling up your sleeves. It is part of a chambara cliche. The samurai going into a duel or other similar action also tie back their sleeves with a cord.

                  Your Humble Servant
                  Solveig Throndardottir
                  Amateur Scholar



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.