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Archaeologists may have uncovered the the residence of Fujiwara no Yoshimi,...

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  • FlyingRat
    Sent to you by FlyingRat via Google Reader: Archaeologists may have uncovered the the residence of Fujiwara no Yoshimi, a prominent politician and court noble
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 10, 2011
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      Sent to you by FlyingRat via Google Reader: Archaeologists may have
      uncovered the the residence of Fujiwara no Yoshimi, a prominent
      politician and court noble of the Heian period (794 to 1185) via
      Heritage of Japan by heritageofjapan on 12/10/11

      9th-century earthenware found in possible remains of ex-aristocrat’s
      residence in Kyoto (Mainichi Japan) December 10, 2011

      Earthenware found in Kyoto's Nakagyo Ward is seen in this photo taken
      on Dec. 8. (Mainichi)

      KYOTO — The Kyoto City Archaeological Research Institute said it has
      unearthed earthenware in an excavation site, which is believed to be
      the remains of a residence for Fujiwara no Yoshimi, a prominent
      politician and court noble in the Heian period (794 to 1185).

      The earthenware found is inscribed with black ink as “Sanjo-in
      Tsuridono Takatsuki” (Sanjo residence, palatial-style ‘tsuridono’
      architecture, pedestal serving bowl). The Chinese character “in” in the
      inscription means a “great residence.” The research institute said the
      Chinese characters such as “in” inscribed on the pottery support the
      theory that the remains where it was unearthed were those for the
      residence of Fujiwara no Yoshimi. It was the first time that the
      location of a residence of an aristocrat within Heiankyo (present-day
      Kyoto) had been confirmed.

      The earthenware was discovered when research was conducted on the
      building of a new campus for Bukkyo University there. Old documents and
      other materials had suggested that the residence of Fujiwara no Yoshimi
      could be in that area, but there were also different views. Fujiwara no
      Yoshimi was a younger brother of Fujiwara no Yoshifusa, who became the
      first regent from outside the Imperial Family. Old documents show that
      Empress Dowager Nobuko, Yoshimi’s elder sister, had stayed at the
      residence for about one year from 859.

      The Chinese character “in” refers to a structure where the Imperial
      Family stayed, and the pedestal serving bowl, which was inscribed in
      Chinese characters, is believed to have been used in a traditional
      palatial-style “tsuridono” architecture overhanging the pond. The
      remains of the pond and the “tsuridono” architecture were also found
      along with ceramics imported from China.

      Nishisanjodai, the name of Fujiwara no Yoshimi’s residence, was also
      called “Hyakkatei” (One hundred flower pavilion) where Emperor Seiwa is
      believed to have hosted a cherry flower banquet. Yoshihiro Marukawa, a
      senior official of the research institute said, “It becomes clear that
      (Fujiwara no Yoshimi) had major power. Based on the analysis of the
      artifacts, it is believed to have been built in the latter half of the
      9th century, which coincided with the declining period of the Yoshimi
      family.”


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