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Hoeki no ho construction

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  • maistressealysia
    Greetings, This is the first time posting to the list and I m extremely new to making Japanese clothing. I am in the process of making a Hoeki no ho for my
    Message 1 of 4 , May 29, 2011
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      Greetings,

      This is the first time posting to the list and I'm extremely new to making Japanese clothing. I am in the process of making a Hoeki no ho for my fiance and I have a couple of questions on the construction.

      1. Is the ran (wing like piece) only attached to the back of the garment?

      2. On the pattern provided by Edward of Effingham it doesn't state if the 10 inch width of the front band is measured at the top or the bottom of the piece. It looks like the 10 inches is at the bottom but then how wide is it suppose to be at the top of the piece?

      Thank you
      Alysia (who needs to come up with a Japanese name)
    • JL Badgley
      ... The ran actually goes around the entire bottom hem, so the garment actually flares out with the ran being the actual hem. This may help (hopefully). This
      Message 2 of 4 , May 30, 2011
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        On Mon, May 30, 2011 at 8:54 AM, maistressealysia <attiyam@...> wrote:
        > Greetings,
        >
        > This is the first time posting to the list and I'm extremely new to making Japanese clothing. I am in the process of making a Hoeki no ho for my fiance and I have a couple of questions on the construction.
        >
        > 1. Is the ran (wing like piece) only attached to the back of the garment?

        The ran actually goes around the entire bottom hem, so the garment
        actually flares out with the ran being the actual hem.

        This may help (hopefully). This is the early version of the garment:
        http://www.iz2.or.jp/fukushoku/f_disp.php?page_no=0000024

        If you look at the piece attached to the bottom (the ran) you will see
        that there is an area at the side seam that is pleated. The later
        "wings" are basically this pleat extended out to the sides:
        http://www.iz2.or.jp/fukushoku/f_disp.php?page_no=0000026

        Here are some noushi that we've made. Noushi are the same as the
        houeki no hou, but they have ties on the sides and the "pouch" at the
        back is actually sewn inside the garment, rather than outside:
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/tatsushu/2950854878/in/set-72157607136270468
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/tatsushu/566906588/in/set-72157600395403106

        Here is one that we bought in Japan. I believe it is technically an
        "ikan" in that it is made with houeki-no-hou fabric, but in the
        pattern of a noushi:
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/tatsushu/3271195689/in/set-72157605726232740

        I tried to take lots of pictures of each, so you can get a good idea.

        > 2. On the pattern provided by Edward of Effingham it doesn't state if the 10 inch width of the front band is measured at the top or the bottom of the piece. It looks like the 10 inches is at the bottom but then how wide is it suppose to be at the top of the piece?
        >
        Are you talking about the "okumi" (the two vertical pieces that attach
        on the front and form the overlap)? If so, you can use the pieces
        I've shown for reference, but generally the top of the okumi is
        probably going to be about half the width of the bottom, so 5" at the
        top to 10" at the bottom wouldn't be amiss.

        -Ii
      • Mazelle Attiya
        Yes I was talking about the okumi. Thank you! The information you provided has helped me tremendously. What exactly is the pouch in the back of the garment
        Message 3 of 4 , May 31, 2011
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          Yes I was talking about the okumi. Thank you! The information you provided
          has helped me tremendously. What exactly is the pouch in the back of the
          garment used for? Is there a standard depth for this?



          Alysia



          From: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sca-jml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          JL Badgley
          Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2011 1:04 AM
          To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Hoeki no ho construction





          On Mon, May 30, 2011 at 8:54 AM, maistressealysia <attiyam@...
          <mailto:attiyam%40bellsouth.net> > wrote:
          > Greetings,
          >
          > This is the first time posting to the list and I'm extremely new to making
          Japanese clothing. I am in the process of making a Hoeki no ho for my fiance
          and I have a couple of questions on the construction.
          >
          > 1. Is the ran (wing like piece) only attached to the back of the garment?

          The ran actually goes around the entire bottom hem, so the garment
          actually flares out with the ran being the actual hem.

          This may help (hopefully). This is the early version of the garment:
          http://www.iz2.or.jp/fukushoku/f_disp.php?page_no=0000024

          If you look at the piece attached to the bottom (the ran) you will see
          that there is an area at the side seam that is pleated. The later
          "wings" are basically this pleat extended out to the sides:
          http://www.iz2.or.jp/fukushoku/f_disp.php?page_no=0000026

          Here are some noushi that we've made. Noushi are the same as the
          houeki no hou, but they have ties on the sides and the "pouch" at the
          back is actually sewn inside the garment, rather than outside:
          http://www.flickr.com/photos/tatsushu/2950854878/in/set-72157607136270468
          http://www.flickr.com/photos/tatsushu/566906588/in/set-72157600395403106

          Here is one that we bought in Japan. I believe it is technically an
          "ikan" in that it is made with houeki-no-hou fabric, but in the
          pattern of a noushi:
          http://www.flickr.com/photos/tatsushu/3271195689/in/set-72157605726232740

          I tried to take lots of pictures of each, so you can get a good idea.

          > 2. On the pattern provided by Edward of Effingham it doesn't state if the
          10 inch width of the front band is measured at the top or the bottom of the
          piece. It looks like the 10 inches is at the bottom but then how wide is it
          suppose to be at the top of the piece?
          >
          Are you talking about the "okumi" (the two vertical pieces that attach
          on the front and form the overlap)? If so, you can use the pieces
          I've shown for reference, but generally the top of the okumi is
          probably going to be about half the width of the bottom, so 5" at the
          top to 10" at the bottom wouldn't be amiss.

          -Ii





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • JL Badgley
          ... I have no details on what the pouch is for, exactly, but it is important. The way it is sewn, the belt should actually be slightly or fully covered in
          Message 4 of 4 , May 31, 2011
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            On Tue, May 31, 2011 at 6:22 PM, Mazelle Attiya <attiyam@...> wrote:
            > Yes I was talking about the okumi. Thank you! The information you provided
            > has helped me tremendously. What exactly is the pouch in the back of the
            > garment used for?  Is there a standard depth for this?
            >
            I have no details on what the pouch is for, exactly, but it is
            important. The way it is sewn, the belt should actually be slightly
            or fully covered in back, as I recall (this would depend on what
            school you were going with). I have one book on this that seems to
            suggest the purpose was originally to help get the "pigeon-breasted"
            look by taking up the extra in the back, making the back of the
            garment shorter than the front.

            I'm looking for more info, but not finding it at the moment.

            -Ii
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