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Re: [SCA-JML] Re: Archery

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  • Michelle Touketto
    MODERATOR NOTE: This message was originally top posted over two preceding messages. They have been removed as they do not require repetition. Thank you.
    Message 1 of 29 , Jan 31, 2011
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      MODERATOR NOTE: This message was originally "top posted" over two preceding messages. They have been removed as they do not require repetition. Thank you. Saionji no Hana, Pacific Time Zone
      POSTER'S ORIGINAL MESSAGE FOLLOWS:

      As a note, my email address is one of long standing and not a reference to an SCA title. I signed up for the group with the wrong account. Usually, I remember to use the other one to avoid seeming like I'm presuming on a title.

      Thank you for the information, and yes, you are correct about the name of the dojo. Lol, as much as he loves the concepts behind many Japanese activities, he is not a generally patient person! And I noted from a few sites that kyudo seems to be very focused on Zen teachings, and that there was one site that mentioned another archery form called kyujutsu or kyujitsu.

      Anyone know anything about that form, and it's potential use in the SCA?

      Gwenhwyvar
      Barony of Sternfeld
      Middle Kingdom
    • Erin Kelly
      If you are in range of Pennsic, there s a vendor there called Yumi who specializes in Japanese archery. Also, many of my colleagues in Clan YamaKaminari have
      Message 2 of 29 , Feb 1, 2011
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        If you are in range of Pennsic, there's a vendor there called Yumi who
        specializes in Japanese archery. Also, many of my colleagues in Clan
        YamaKaminari have experience with Japanese archery, both in target
        shooting and in SCA combat - stop by our camp if you make it to
        Pennsic and we can find someone to talk with you about it.

        ERIN
      • David Holt
        I ve done ZNKR Kyudo (at the Indiana Kyudo Renmei), Heki Ryu Bishu Chikurin-ha Kyudo, and modern western-style sport archery. I still practice them all, but am
        Message 3 of 29 , Feb 1, 2011
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          I've done ZNKR Kyudo (at the Indiana Kyudo Renmei), Heki Ryu Bishu Chikurin-ha Kyudo, and modern western-style sport archery. I still practice them all, but am not currently taking instruction in any. I did enjoy my training in Indiana, but it was a long drive from Chicago. For someone with not much patience, it might be a good way to learn and practice patience.

          Kyujutsu is theoretically more combat oriented than Kyudo, but it's not a hard and fast rule. With no enemies to shoot at for the past 400 years, all the -jutsu arts have become very similar to the -do arts. I have been working on removing the ritual from the Kyudo I know to see how it might work as a martial art.

          I disagree that western and Japanese archery are so different. So many of the basics are the same (relax your shoulders and hands, use your back instead of your arms, be consistent in your movements, don't hurry your movements, etc.). The differences are in the details (use your fingers or your thumb, arrow on the left or on the right, pull to the midbody or full arm length, pull from the front or from above, etc.). If I shoot both western and Japanese on the same day, it takes me a moment to get used to each one, but then I can easily switch back and forth. I particularly don't like the modern Kyudo glove, though. I wear a thick leather gardening glove now. I wouldn't have to remove it if I had to switch to my sword and if I decided to remove it, it would take 2 seconds instead of 2 minutes. I hear the Yabusame gloves are much softer, thinner, and more flexible, so I might see if I can find one of those the next time I'm in Japan.

          But I can't speak to how any of it works for historical accuracy or SCA purposes.
        • chagin1
          ... This I doubt. Archeological evidence shows asymmetrical bows buried in graves before the horse was introduced into Japan. The design predates the horse.
          Message 4 of 29 , Feb 6, 2011
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            --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Chibasama Ryúichiro <chiba@...> wrote:
            >
            > While they are very well used kneeling, the design of the yumi was for use
            > on a horseback.
            >
            > Live, Love, Learn!
            > -Chiba

            This I doubt. Archeological evidence shows asymmetrical bows buried in graves before the horse was introduced into Japan. The design predates the horse.

            Takanofuji Jutte
          • JL Badgley
            ... Can you come up with dates and cites? I d be interested in what you have, because that isn t a claim I recall seeing before. From what I can see, the
            Message 5 of 29 , Feb 6, 2011
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              On Mon, Feb 7, 2011 at 10:40 AM, chagin1 <chagin1@...> wrote:
              >
              > This I doubt.  Archeological evidence shows asymmetrical bows buried in graves before the horse was introduced into Japan.  The design predates the horse.
              >
              Can you come up with dates and cites? I'd be interested in what you
              have, because that isn't a claim I recall seeing before.

              From what I can see, the assymetric bow occurs across central Eurasia,
              in one form or another--I'm not sure what the oldest dates of bows and
              horses are, though. I've also seen some theories that it has more to
              do with power generation than it has to do with horseback riding.


              -Ii
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