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Sleeveless dobuku question

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  • daffydd1
    Hi folks, Please forgive my ignorance as I am new to Japanese clothing. I am looking to make a sleeveless dobuku to go over kosode and hakima. My question is
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 16, 2010
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      Hi folks,

      Please forgive my ignorance as I am new to Japanese clothing.

      I am looking to make a sleeveless dobuku to go over kosode and hakima.

      My question is were the side seams of the dobuku closed or open?

      I have been looking at various pics and can't get a good idea if the sides of the front panels are attached to the sides of the back.

      I made a mock up using the measurements from Baron Effingham's Hitatare pattern, but I'm wondering now if the body panels are wide enough to allow them to meet on the sides.

      Any advice would be appreciated.

      I apologize in advance if this topic has already been covered. I searched the message archive but did not find the information I was seeking.

      Dafydd MacNab
    • wodeford
      ... Closed. It s basically a kosode-form garment without the overlap panels. It can be sleeveless, have kosode-like sleeves or open tube sleeves. There was a
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 16, 2010
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        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "daffydd1" <dafydd1@...> wrote:
        > My question is were the side seams of the dobuku closed or open?

        Closed. It's basically a kosode-form garment without the overlap panels. It can be sleeveless, have kosode-like sleeves or open tube sleeves.

        There was a discussion on the Tousando forum awhile back at
        http://tousando.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=garb&action=display&thread=1644

        > I made a mock up using the measurements from Baron Effingham's Hitatare pattern, but I'm wondering now if the body panels are wide enough to allow them to meet on the sides.

        Probably not, as hitatare (and kataginu) do not have closed sides and are meant to be held in place with himo or obi under one's hakama. A dobuku is like a coat or jacket which would not be worn under, but over.

        Hope this helps,
        Saionji no Hanae
        West Kingdom
      • David & Margaret George
        Thanks for the tip. I finished it as a kataginu and will re-try a dobuku at another time. Thanks again, Dafydd MacNab Barony of Westermark Kingdom of the West
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 16, 2010
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          Thanks for the tip.

          I finished it as a kataginu and will re-try a dobuku at another time.

          Thanks again,

          Dafydd MacNab
          Barony of Westermark
          Kingdom of the West


          On Jul 16, 2010, at 3:24 PM, wodeford wrote:

          > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "daffydd1" <dafydd1@...> wrote:
          > > My question is were the side seams of the dobuku closed or open?
          >
          > Closed. It's basically a kosode-form garment without the overlap panels. It can be sleeveless, have kosode-like sleeves or open tube sleeves.
          >
          > There was a discussion on the Tousando forum awhile back at
          > http://tousando.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=garb&action=display&thread=1644
          >
          > > I made a mock up using the measurements from Baron Effingham's Hitatare pattern, but I'm wondering now if the body panels are wide enough to allow them to meet on the sides.
          >
          > Probably not, as hitatare (and kataginu) do not have closed sides and are meant to be held in place with himo or obi under one's hakama. A dobuku is like a coat or jacket which would not be worn under, but over.
          >
          > Hope this helps,
          > Saionji no Hanae
          > West Kingdom
          >
          >


          ________________________________
          David A. George
          KB3SHD








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