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wisteria

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  • juditheileen21
    Greetings, I have been reading that the poorer people wore fabric made of hemp and wisteria. Hemp I know, wisteria I don t. Has anyone read anything about
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 18, 2010
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      Greetings,

      I have been reading that the poorer people wore fabric made of hemp and wisteria. Hemp I know, wisteria I don't. Has anyone read anything about wisteria fabric? Is there a specific type of wisteria? What part of the wisteria plant was used? What was the process to turn wisteria into fabric?

      Thanks,
      Eileen
    • wodeford
      ... Where did you read this? I m always looking for new factoids with which to fill the trivia brain. ... Several years ago at Yosemite, I watched a museum
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 18, 2010
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        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "juditheileen21" <judith.eileen@...> wrote:
        > I have been reading that the poorer people wore fabric made of hemp and wisteria. Hemp I know, wisteria I don't. Has anyone read anything about wisteria fabric?

        Where did you read this? I'm always looking for new factoids with which to fill the trivia brain.

        > What part of the wisteria plant was used? What was the process to turn wisteria into fabric?

        Several years ago at Yosemite, I watched a museum docent turn twigs into string, using a method the indigenous Native Americans of the area had developed. He stripped the bark into thin pieces, then twisted the fibers into threads, then twisted the threads into string. (Yes, I blew off an Ansel Adams photo exhibit to watch this.)
        Possibly a similar method could be used with wisteria vine fibers, but I admit I am speculating.

        Saionji no Hanae
        West Kingdom
      • Douglas
        There s sometimes a thin line between basketry and fabric. http://threads.srithreads.com/2010/02/08/fiber-from-vines-the-beauty-of-grape-and-wisteria/
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 18, 2010
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          There's sometimes a thin line between basketry and fabric.
          http://threads.srithreads.com/2010/02/08/fiber-from-vines-the-beauty-of-grape-and-wisteria/


          --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "wodeford" <wodeford@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "juditheileen21" <judith.eileen@> wrote:
          > > I have been reading that the poorer people wore fabric made of hemp and wisteria. Hemp I know, wisteria I don't. Has anyone read anything about wisteria fabric?
          >
          > Where did you read this? I'm always looking for new factoids with which to fill the trivia brain.
          >
          > > What part of the wisteria plant was used? What was the process to turn wisteria into fabric?
          >
          > Several years ago at Yosemite, I watched a museum docent turn twigs into string, using a method the indigenous Native Americans of the area had developed. He stripped the bark into thin pieces, then twisted the fibers into threads, then twisted the threads into string. (Yes, I blew off an Ansel Adams photo exhibit to watch this.)
          > Possibly a similar method could be used with wisteria vine fibers, but I admit I am speculating.
          >
          > Saionji no Hanae
          > West Kingdom
          >
        • Solveig Throndardottir
          Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... I m also curious about where you ran across this. I thought that they were using ramie which is also a vine and was
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 18, 2010
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            Noble Cousin!

            Greetings from Solveig!

            >> I have been reading that the poorer people wore fabric made of hemp
            >> and wisteria. Hemp I know, wisteria I don't. Has anyone read
            >> anything about wisteria fabric?


            I'm also curious about where you ran across this. I thought that they
            were using ramie which is also a vine and was cultivated in East Asia.

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar
          • Eileen Young
            I read that in several different books that I checked out of the library. One I still have at home. I ll go home and look. Eileen ...
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 18, 2010
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              I read that in several different books that I checked out of the library. One I still have at home. I'll go home and look.

              Eileen

              > To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
              > From: nostrand@...
              > Date: Fri, 18 Jun 2010 18:24:45 -0400
              > Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Re: wisteria
              >
              > Noble Cousin!
              >
              > Greetings from Solveig!
              >
              > >> I have been reading that the poorer people wore fabric made of hemp
              > >> and wisteria. Hemp I know, wisteria I don't. Has anyone read
              > >> anything about wisteria fabric?
              >
              >
              > I'm also curious about where you ran across this. I thought that they
              > were using ramie which is also a vine and was cultivated in East Asia.
              >
              > Your Humble Servant
              > Solveig Throndardottir
              > Amateur Scholar
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >

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            • Erica
              ... This thread intrigued me, so I googled around a little bit and found this- http://www.tribaltextiles.info/community/viewtopic.php?t=1384 It has a pictures
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 19, 2010
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                --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "wodeford" <wodeford@...> wrote:
                >
                > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "juditheileen21" <judith.eileen@> wrote:
                > > I have been reading that the poorer people wore fabric made of hemp and wisteria. Hemp I know, wisteria I don't. Has anyone read anything about wisteria fabric?
                >
                > Where did you read this? I'm always looking for new factoids with which to fill the trivia brain.
                >
                > > What part of the wisteria plant was used? What was the process to turn wisteria into fabric?
                >

                This thread intrigued me, so I googled around a little bit and found this-

                http://www.tribaltextiles.info/community/viewtopic.php?t=1384

                It has a pictures scanned from an article in a Japanese magazine, of Ainu textiles made from elm bark, wisteria, and banana fibers.
              • Jeanel Walker
                http://www.tribaltextiles.info/community/viewtopic.php?t=1384
                Message 7 of 11 , Jun 19, 2010
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                  http://www.tribaltextiles.info/community/viewtopic.php?t=1384



                  <It has a pictures scanned from an article in a Japanese magazine, of
                  Ainu textiles made <from elm bark, wisteria, and banana fibers.


                   all i can say is WOW

                  May the joy of your past be the worst of your tomorrows!!!
                  Jeanel Walker aka Eilionora "Takaatsu" of Kisimull
                  http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg208/brytephyre/Takinagadevisesm.jpg
                  http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg208/brytephyre/Eilionoriadevicesm.jpg


                  --- On Sat, 6/19/10, Erica <ejstark2@...> wrote:

                  From: Erica <ejstark2@...>
                  Subject: [SCA-JML] Re: wisteria
                  To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Saturday, June 19, 2010, 10:49 AM







                   













                  --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "wodeford" <wodeford@...> wrote:

                  >

                  > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "juditheileen21" <judith.eileen@> wrote:

                  > > I have been reading that the poorer people wore fabric made of hemp and wisteria. Hemp I know, wisteria I don't. Has anyone read anything about wisteria fabric?

                  >

                  > Where did you read this? I'm always looking for new factoids with which to fill the trivia brain.

                  >

                  > > What part of the wisteria plant was used? What was the process to turn wisteria into fabric?

                  >



                  This thread intrigued me, so I googled around a little bit and found this-



                  http://www.tribaltextiles.info/community/viewtopic.php?t=1384



                  It has a pictures scanned from an article in a Japanese magazine, of Ainu textiles made from elm bark, wisteria, and banana fibers.

























                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Eileen Young
                  Thank you so much. I thought that the fibers were probably prepared in a similar fashion. I wish I could read the wording. Eileen ...
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jun 19, 2010
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                    Thank you so much. I thought that the fibers were probably prepared in a similar fashion. I wish I could read the wording.
                    Eileen

                    > To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                    > From: brytephyre@...
                    > Date: Sat, 19 Jun 2010 09:42:46 -0700
                    > Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Re: wisteria
                    >
                    > http://www.tribaltextiles.info/community/viewtopic.php?t=1384
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > <It has a pictures scanned from an article in a Japanese magazine, of
                    > Ainu textiles made <from elm bark, wisteria, and banana fibers.
                    >
                    >
                    > all i can say is WOW
                    >
                    > May the joy of your past be the worst of your tomorrows!!!
                    > Jeanel Walker aka Eilionora "Takaatsu" of Kisimull
                    > http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg208/brytephyre/Takinagadevisesm.jpg
                    > http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg208/brytephyre/Eilionoriadevicesm.jpg


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                  • Andrew T Trembley
                    ... Hemp, ramie (china grass, which isn t a grass but rather a variety of nettle, and produces a beautiful bright white cloth) and kudzu (kuzubakama!) are
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jun 19, 2010
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                      On 6/18/2010 3:24 PM, Solveig Throndardottir wrote:
                      > Noble Cousin!
                      >
                      > Greetings from Solveig!
                      >
                      >
                      >>> I have been reading that the poorer people wore fabric made of hemp
                      >>> and wisteria. Hemp I know, wisteria I don't. Has anyone read
                      >>> anything about wisteria fabric?
                      >>>
                      >
                      > I'm also curious about where you ran across this. I thought that they
                      > were using ramie which is also a vine and was cultivated in East Asia.
                      >

                      Hemp, ramie (china grass, which isn't a grass but rather a variety of
                      nettle, and produces a beautiful bright white cloth) and kudzu
                      (kuzubakama!) are well-documented in period. We may be running into some
                      of the fibers/fabrics that have been on occasion described as "paper."

                      andy
                    • Solveig Throndardottir
                      Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! Please take a look at the web page again. The business about banana fibers is a note separate from the Japanese article
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jun 19, 2010
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                        Noble Cousin!

                        Greetings from Solveig! Please take a look at the web page again. The
                        business about banana fibers is a note separate from the Japanese
                        article and describes a garment purchased in Okinawa (extreme
                        southwestern Japan) as opposed to Hokkaido (extreme northeastern
                        Japan) which is where the Ainu live. I figured that you must have
                        missed something as I was having a hard time imagining the Ainu doing
                        things with banana leaves.

                        Your Humble Servant
                        Solveig Throndardottir
                        Amateur Scholar
                      • Solveig Throndardottir
                        Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! I m not sure, but the web page you cited appears to have images drawn from more than one article. Regardless, it does
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jun 19, 2010
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                          Noble Cousin!

                          Greetings from Solveig! I'm not sure, but the web page you cited
                          appears to have images drawn from more than one article. Regardless,
                          it does have images which are supposed to show wisteria being prepared
                          for use as a fiber. The series of images tagged as wisteria do indeed
                          appear to be showing the stages of making cloth from wisteria. Among
                          other things, it shows the degumming process which involves boiling
                          the wisteria shavings with ashes.

                          Your Humble Servant
                          Solveig Throndardottir
                          Amateur Scholar
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