Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Did Japanese use shields

Expand Messages
  • Waffle
    The main idea when parrying with a katana is not to use a dead stop block. Nathan k is essentually correct as to the defensive use of a katana, and for that
    Message 1 of 9 , May 31, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      The main idea when parrying with a katana is not to use a dead stop block. Nathan k is essentually correct as to the defensive use of a katana, and for that matter almost any other Japanese bladed weapon. There are essentially two basic defensive techniques used in kenjutsu. The first is to move out of the way of the attack and then simultaneously counter-attacking. The second is to use the side, or, even better, the back of the blade to defect the attack in a manner similar to a slap parry in fencing. Then use the momentum of the parry to set up the back swing for an immediate counter-attack.

      As for the use of the saya (scabbard) as a blocking or parrying tool, and I am speculating here, I am sure it may have been done, but with the quality of katanas that we know of, as a parryng tool, maybe, but a dead stop block with the saya probably means two smaller sayas, or at least a severly damaged one. So, I am just not sure of how effective it would be, unless you are just well pacticed in using one that way.

      Waffle

      --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Nathan k" <pendrin2020@...> wrote:
      >
      > Real Sword steel from the proper parts of Japan is some of the strongest known to man. I have no doubt that the blade COULD have been used to block, but based on what little I know of kendo and my actual combat experience, I doubt it was used in the outright blocking capacity of say, a shield. A blade could be used to redirect an opponents swing and leave him open to attack. Much in the same way you see during a kendo demonstration.
      >
      > Instead of holding the blade before me and letting my opponent make contact with the sides of the blade, I bring the blade above me (or to the side) and let my opponent's sword slide down its surface. At this point I'm coiled to strike and my opponent is committed to his swing. I'm most often offered strike zones on the forearms and wrists.
      >
      > Block/deflect with the back-swing and strike.
      >
      > Like I said, my experience is extremely limited. Most of what I know is taught to me by my unit members, but if it works now, I see no reason it didn't work 200 years ago.
      >
      > PLEASE feel free to correct me here. I offer this with as much humility as I can muster, you guys know a lot more than I do.
      >
      > Pendrin
      >
      > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, JL Badgley <tatsushu@> wrote:
      > >
      > > On Sun, May 30, 2010 at 12:12 PM, Jeanel Walker <brytephyre@> wrote:
      > > > ok now i have a question...did they not use the shaft of there sword as a blocker??? something like a shield. i mean i know its movie blitz but they had to come up with the idea from somewhere.
      > > >
      > > Do you mean the scabbard?
      > >
      > > They could block with the scabbard, but that's not its purpose.
      > >
      > > It is hardly a substitute for a shield, though they probably trusted
      > > their armor in that regard (rather like Europeans did, when they moved
      > > away from maille armor).
      > >
      > > -Ii
      > >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.