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Re: Magic

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  • wodeford
    ... The person who would likely know is Kuji-dono. Try contacting him via his website as I don t believe he s on this list these days:
    Message 1 of 7 , May 10, 2010
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      --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Bryant Richards <ninjalikereflex@...> wrote:
      >
      > Would anyone happen to know off hand if there was "Magic" in period Japan? And what I mean by magic is "tricks" you know, pulling a rabbit out of a hat, making something seem to vanish, etc.

      The person who would likely know is Kuji-dono. Try contacting him via his website as I don't believe he's on this list these days:

      http://kuji.windycitywizard.com/

      I met him the last time I was back east for Pennsic and I was suitably impressed by his skills.

      Saionji no Hanae
      West Kingdom
    • JL Badgley
      ... I ve camped with him, and I m impressed by both his skills and his knowledge (e.g. tracking down where certain tricks show up and the paths they follow).
      Message 2 of 7 , May 10, 2010
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        On Tue, May 11, 2010 at 12:07 AM, wodeford <wodeford@...> wrote:
        >
        > The person who would likely know is Kuji-dono. Try contacting him via his website as I don't believe he's on this list these days:
        >
        > http://kuji.windycitywizard.com/
        >
        > I met him the last time I was back east for Pennsic and I was suitably impressed by his skills.
        >
        I've camped with him, and I'm impressed by both his skills and his
        knowledge (e.g. tracking down where certain tricks show up and the
        paths they follow). He has many plausibly period, if not period,
        tricks that will work in a Japanese context.

        The problem that you get into in a place like Japan is the fine line
        between a religious person and a charlatan. For instance, did a
        medium actually believe that they were speaking for the dead, did they
        believe they were providing a service to the community, or had they
        just found a way to get paid? These are tricky questions. If a
        yamabushi or priest is under pressure to show the community "miracles"
        of some sort, then is it worth a trick or to in order to foster a true
        belief?

        Also, a lot of "magic" gets roped into the various acrobatic feats.
        Doing somersaults and climbing a ladder made of sword blades might be
        considered similar tricks to the average person. Furthermore, I don't
        know how many of those kinds of shows were actually written down.

        Suggestions for those looking for plausibly period magic to do at events:

        1) Simple tricks with a Japanese flair. I've seen cups and balls done
        with Japanese bowls and a tiny buddha (actually, Hotei) statue instead
        of the typical cups and balls.

        2) Look through the stories. The ancient stories have all sorts of
        magic in them, and I'm sure that an enterprising person could figure
        out how to do them. I really need to practice turning oranges into
        mice, for instance--one of the tricks that Seimei is supposed to have
        done in front of the emperor. You can often take modern tricks and
        adapt them to period stories such that you now have something that
        fits in a Japanese milieu.

        Does that help?

        -Ii
      • Bryant Richards
        ... Yes that does, thank you very much. Also interestingly enough it is so much easier to find Chinese Magic vs Japanese, I wonder why that is? In Honor and
        Message 3 of 7 , May 10, 2010
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          >Does that help?
          Yes that does, thank you very much. Also interestingly enough it is so much easier to find "Chinese Magic" vs Japanese, I wonder why that is?

          In Honor and Service,
          Uesugi no Ryujuichiro Uchiyasu
          House Chiburi




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Sonny Scott
          If I recall something I read; the Japanese Magicians Circle was very closed. Almost a secret society or old boys club . I m willing to think that very
          Message 4 of 7 , May 10, 2010
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            If I recall something I read; the Japanese "Magicians Circle" was very closed. Almost a secret society or 'old boys club'. I'm willing to think that very little was written down for publication.



            >
            >From: Bryant Richards <ninjalikereflex@...>
            >To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
            >Sent: Mon, May 10, 2010 7:54:49 PM
            >Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Re: Magic
            >
            > >
            >>
            >
            >>Does that help?
            >>Yes that does, thank you very much. Also interestingly enough it is so much easier to find "Chinese Magic" vs Japanese, I wonder why that is?
            >
            >>In Honor and Service,
            >>Uesugi no Ryujuichiro Uchiyasu
            >>House Chiburi
            >
            >>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Solveig Throndardottir
            Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! Mundanely, Kuji dono is a full service magician . I recommend participating in his annual Pennsic party if you are at
            Message 5 of 7 , May 10, 2010
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              Noble Cousin!

              Greetings from Solveig! Mundanely, Kuji dono is a "full service
              magician". I recommend participating in his annual Pennsic party if
              you are at Pennsic.

              I'm not sure whether there was stage magic in premodern Japan. There
              were various flavors of magicians and the yamabushi were notorious
              enough as humbugs to be the but of a whole genre of kyogen plays. As
              I recall, Kuji dono has chosen to recreate a yamabushi.

              Your Humble Servant
              Solveig Throndardottir
              Amateur Scholar
            • Solveig Throndardottir
              Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! I agree with what Ii dono brought up. If I recall correctly, it is called sarugaku if you want a search term.
              Message 6 of 7 , May 10, 2010
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                Noble Cousins!

                Greetings from Solveig! I agree with what Ii dono brought up. If I
                recall correctly, it is called "sarugaku" if you want a search term.
                Regardless, there were street performers who performed a variety of
                acrobatic stunts and such like.

                Your Humble Servant
                Solveig Throndardottir
                Amateur Scholar
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