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Questions about 1500-1600 clothing

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  • Audrey Bergeron-Morin
    Good evening! I have a few questions about Japanese costume. I hope you can provide some help. I will be attending an event this summer and I need clothes
    Message 1 of 39 , Mar 21, 2010
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      Good evening!

      I have a few questions about Japanese costume. I hope you can provide some help.

      I will be attending an event this summer and I need clothes somewhere
      between 1500-1600. I will probably be working in the kitchen, so
      flowing garments are not a good idea. I am looking at costumes for
      peasants, sellers and servants on the Kyoto Costume Museum.

      I have summed up my questions below, but if you want to read the whole
      thing, you can find it here:
      http://audreybmorin.blogspot.com/2010/03/on-to-japanese-clothing.html

      I particularly like these two, even if they're earlier than the period
      I'm aiming for:
      Ohara-me or peasant woman of Ohara village selling firewood in Kyoto,
      from this address http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/fukusyoku/busou/24.htm.
      and
      Katsura-me or peasant woman of Katsura village selling food in Kyoto,
      from this address http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/fukusyoku/busou/25.htm.

      How are the tekko (arm protectors) and habaki/kyahan (leg protectors)
      made? Are they the same as the modern martial arts version? Do they
      serve a purpose other than protection (in other words, would it be
      indecent to go without)? I keep reading that habaki/kyahan should be
      worn over tabi, but the second costume above doesn't seem to be
      wearing any; and white tabi with waraji in the dust and mud doesn't
      seem practical...

      For this kind of clothing, what fabric width would be used, given that
      they would likely not be made of the silk higher classes used? Would
      it be the 16-17 inch wide fabric standard for the period?

      Also, if I were to make a longer kosode, were they made ankle length
      in the period or were they always poofed up over the obi?

      When painting designs such as
      http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/fukusyoku/kosode/3.htm (this one is early
      Edo), the designs seem to continue onto the collar and over the seams.
      Are they painted/printed before (and calculated very carfeully!) or
      after the garment is assembled?

      Last question: how good or bad are the costumes in Shogun? They're
      beautiful, but are they reliable?

      Thank you for your help,

      Audrey

      P.S. I have already read the very useful Wodeford Hall article about
      making kosode and fabric painting :-) Thank you for writing it.
    • JL Badgley
      ... They all strike me as modern, and yet I wouldn t worry about that for purposes of the SCA; it will still add flavor to your persona. The words are not
      Message 39 of 39 , Dec 14, 2010
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        On Wed, Dec 15, 2010 at 1:47 AM, Erin Kelly <tupan4@...> wrote:
        > Does anyone here know how old/applicable these expressions (learned via
        > modern Japanese pop culture) might be?
        >
        >  - Yosh! (motivating exclamation before attempting something physical or
        > difficult)
        >  - Yu-issho! (I think this is to motivate people working together, but I
        > might be mis-hearing it.)
        >  - Ganbatte! (go for it/ do your best)
        >  - Yatta! (I did it)
        >
        > ERIN

        They all strike me as modern, and yet I wouldn't worry about that for
        purposes of the SCA; it will still add flavor to your persona. The
        words are not necessarily modern, I just don't know about the
        pronunciation.

        -Ii
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