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Yukinoshita-do

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  • yuber_i
    Hello again! It s been quite a time since my last post. As some of you will remember, i was trying to make my first armour. In the end i managed to put
    Message 1 of 12 , Oct 23, 2009
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      Hello again! It's been quite a time since my last post. As some of you will remember, i was trying to make my first armour. In the end i managed to put together a yukinoshita-do vest. You can see it here: http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c299/Yuber_i/DSCF7311.jpg What do you think about it? (it looks better with me inside)

      As you can see, it still hasn't got any kusazuri: i'm wondering which pattern should i use, even if i should put them on at all (i enjoy the noiseless nature of this armour. I could cross enemy lines at night and no one would hear me!). Also, due to the curvature of the shoulders i think i will be unable to install the small winglets.

      In other order of things, i have read here that there are several patterns for XVIth century samurai attire, so i wanted to ask you: Which is the simplest pattern of clothing? Which are the basic colours? (i'm thinking ronin-style for my own attire) Did samurai use hakama when wearing armour (using suneate to embed them could make them look like trousers, so that's were my doubt comes from)

      Also, i wanted to thank all the people here for their help and advise. Members of this group are definitely great people. Thank you again :)
    • JL Badgley
      ... Nice. Do you have other pictures? The black makes it hard to see lines and details. ... Since hakama basically are trousers (at least in terms of
      Message 2 of 12 , Oct 23, 2009
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        On Fri, Oct 23, 2009 at 3:32 PM, yuber_i <yuber_i@...> wrote:
        > Hello again! It's been quite a time since my last post. As some of you will remember, i was trying to make my first armour. In the end i managed to put together a yukinoshita-do vest. You can see it here: http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c299/Yuber_i/DSCF7311.jpg What do you think about it? (it looks better with me inside)

        Nice. Do you have other pictures? The black makes it hard to see
        lines and details.

        <SNIP>

        > In other order of things, i have read here that there are several patterns for XVIth century samurai attire, so i wanted to ask you: Which is the simplest pattern of clothing? Which are the basic colours? (i'm thinking ronin-style for my own attire) Did samurai use hakama when wearing armour (using suneate to embed them could make them look like trousers, so that's were my doubt comes from)
        >

        Since hakama basically are trousers (at least in terms of two separate
        tubes of fabric in which your legs go through), I'm not sure what you
        are getting at, but the sune-ate do cause them to blouse.

        The easiest for armor is a yoroi-hitatare kamishimo, in my opinion.
        You would wear a kosode (preferrably linen--cotton, too, or even silk,
        but I like linen next to my skin because I feel it is the best for
        soft + wicking away sweat), and then a hitatare and hakama over that.
        Hitatare is basically squares and rectangles--as are the hakama. You
        can find some simple patterns in the Files section, and there are
        links to other pattern sites.

        -Ii
      • wodeford
        ... Of possible interest: http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/katchu/katchu.ch16.html http://www.rhinohide.cx/tousando/yoriaku/ Saionji no Hanae West Kingdom
        Message 3 of 12 , Oct 23, 2009
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          --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, JL Badgley <tatsushu@...> wrote:
          > The easiest for armor is a yoroi-hitatare kamishimo, in my opinion.
          > You would wear a kosode (preferrably linen--cotton, too, or even silk,
          > but I like linen next to my skin because I feel it is the best for
          > soft + wicking away sweat), and then a hitatare and hakama over that.
          > Hitatare is basically squares and rectangles--as are the hakama. You
          > can find some simple patterns in the Files section, and there are
          > links to other pattern sites.

          Of possible interest:
          http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/katchu/katchu.ch16.html
          http://www.rhinohide.cx/tousando/yoriaku/

          Saionji no Hanae
          West Kingdom
        • purplepenguin_69
          I m not sure if I m right by that picture, but are those pop rivets holding it together? If they are then I would pull all of them because not only do the
          Message 4 of 12 , Oct 23, 2009
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            I'm not sure if I'm right by that picture, but are those pop rivets holding it together? If they are then I would pull all of them because not only do the nubs hurt when you get hit in them, they do not hold up will to the riggers of combat and you would have to change them in a month or so anyway.



            --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "yuber_i" <yuber_i@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello again! It's been quite a time since my last post. As some of you will remember, i was trying to make my first armour. In the end i managed to put together a yukinoshita-do vest. You can see it here: http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c299/Yuber_i/DSCF7311.jpg What do you think about it? (it looks better with me inside)
            >
            > As you can see, it still hasn't got any kusazuri: i'm wondering which pattern should i use, even if i should put them on at all (i enjoy the noiseless nature of this armour. I could cross enemy lines at night and no one would hear me!). Also, due to the curvature of the shoulders i think i will be unable to install the small winglets.
            >
            > In other order of things, i have read here that there are several patterns for XVIth century samurai attire, so i wanted to ask you: Which is the simplest pattern of clothing? Which are the basic colours? (i'm thinking ronin-style for my own attire) Did samurai use hakama when wearing armour (using suneate to embed them could make them look like trousers, so that's were my doubt comes from)
            >
            > Also, i wanted to thank all the people here for their help and advise. Members of this group are definitely great people. Thank you again :)
            >
          • yuber_i
            Hi Badgley, no, i don t have any more pictures, but i can make any if need be. Are you interested in some part of the armour in particular? also, note that the
            Message 5 of 12 , Oct 27, 2009
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              Hi Badgley,
              no, i don't have any more pictures, but i can make any if need be. Are you interested in some part of the armour in particular? also, note that the borders are covered with adhesive tape in order to make it less cutting for me and everyone else.

              And thanks for the patterns!

              --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, JL Badgley <tatsushu@...> wrote:
              >
              > On Fri, Oct 23, 2009 at 3:32 PM, yuber_i <yuber_i@...> wrote:
              > > Hello again! It's been quite a time since my last post. As some of you will remember, i was trying to make my first armour. In the end i managed to put together a yukinoshita-do vest. You can see it here: http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c299/Yuber_i/DSCF7311.jpg What do you think about it? (it looks better with me inside)
              >
              > Nice. Do you have other pictures? The black makes it hard to see
              > lines and details.
              >
              > <SNIP>
              >
              > > In other order of things, i have read here that there are several patterns for XVIth century samurai attire, so i wanted to ask you: Which is the simplest pattern of clothing? Which are the basic colours? (i'm thinking ronin-style for my own attire) Did samurai use hakama when wearing armour (using suneate to embed them could make them look like trousers, so that's were my doubt comes from)
              > >
              >
              > Since hakama basically are trousers (at least in terms of two separate
              > tubes of fabric in which your legs go through), I'm not sure what you
              > are getting at, but the sune-ate do cause them to blouse.
              >
              > The easiest for armor is a yoroi-hitatare kamishimo, in my opinion.
              > You would wear a kosode (preferrably linen--cotton, too, or even silk,
              > but I like linen next to my skin because I feel it is the best for
              > soft + wicking away sweat), and then a hitatare and hakama over that.
              > Hitatare is basically squares and rectangles--as are the hakama. You
              > can find some simple patterns in the Files section, and there are
              > links to other pattern sites.
              >
              > -Ii
              >
            • yuber_i
              That s the sites were i got the info for making my armour, but thanks for the links anyway.
              Message 6 of 12 , Oct 27, 2009
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                That's the sites were i got the info for making my armour, but thanks for the links anyway.

                --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "wodeford" <wodeford@...> wrote:
                >
                > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, JL Badgley <tatsushu@> wrote:
                > > The easiest for armor is a yoroi-hitatare kamishimo, in my opinion.
                > > You would wear a kosode (preferrably linen--cotton, too, or even silk,
                > > but I like linen next to my skin because I feel it is the best for
                > > soft + wicking away sweat), and then a hitatare and hakama over that.
                > > Hitatare is basically squares and rectangles--as are the hakama. You
                > > can find some simple patterns in the Files section, and there are
                > > links to other pattern sites.
                >
                > Of possible interest:
                > http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/katchu/katchu.ch16.html
                > http://www.rhinohide.cx/tousando/yoriaku/
                >
                > Saionji no Hanae
                > West Kingdom
                >
              • yuber_i
                Hi Purplepenguin, Don t know what a pop ribet is (my english is not so good...), but anyway i have only used the armour in a LARP event. Being just 0.8 mm
                Message 7 of 12 , Oct 27, 2009
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                  Hi Purplepenguin,
                  Don't know what a pop ribet is (my english is not so good...), but anyway i have only used the armour in a LARP event. Being just 0.8 mm steel, i'm almost sure it's not fitted for SCA combat... i even feared foam swords or even punches would break it . Fortunately i was wrong, but nevertheless i would not try to soak a real sword swing with it

                  --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "purplepenguin_69" <roninpenguin@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I'm not sure if I'm right by that picture, but are those pop rivets holding it together? If they are then I would pull all of them because not only do the nubs hurt when you get hit in them, they do not hold up will to the riggers of combat and you would have to change them in a month or so anyway.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "yuber_i" <yuber_i@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hello again! It's been quite a time since my last post. As some of you will remember, i was trying to make my first armour. In the end i managed to put together a yukinoshita-do vest. You can see it here: http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c299/Yuber_i/DSCF7311.jpg What do you think about it? (it looks better with me inside)
                  > >
                  > > As you can see, it still hasn't got any kusazuri: i'm wondering which pattern should i use, even if i should put them on at all (i enjoy the noiseless nature of this armour. I could cross enemy lines at night and no one would hear me!). Also, due to the curvature of the shoulders i think i will be unable to install the small winglets.
                  > >
                  > > In other order of things, i have read here that there are several patterns for XVIth century samurai attire, so i wanted to ask you: Which is the simplest pattern of clothing? Which are the basic colours? (i'm thinking ronin-style for my own attire) Did samurai use hakama when wearing armour (using suneate to embed them could make them look like trousers, so that's were my doubt comes from)
                  > >
                  > > Also, i wanted to thank all the people here for their help and advise. Members of this group are definitely great people. Thank you again :)
                  > >
                  >
                • Solveig Throndardottir
                  Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... Pop rivets typically have a hollow core and are secured by using a crimping tool which is similar to a pair of
                  Message 8 of 12 , Oct 27, 2009
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                    Noble Cousin!

                    Greetings from Solveig!
                    > Don't know what a pop ribet is (my english is not so good...),
                    Pop rivets typically have a hollow core and are secured by using a
                    crimping tool which is similar to a pair of pliers.

                    These are pop rivets: http://www.aeroassemblies.com/images/pop/
                    rivets.jpg
                    This is a pop rivet gun: http://school.mech.uwa.edu.au/~nscott/
                    How_to_do_stuff/hand_tools/pop_rivet_tool.jpg

                    Your Humble Servant
                    Solveig Throndardottir
                    Amateur Scholar
                  • yuber_i
                    Greetings sir! Yes, that s exactly what they are. The other type of rivets, are they easy to find?
                    Message 9 of 12 , Oct 27, 2009
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                      Greetings sir!

                      Yes, that's exactly what they are. The other type of rivets, are they easy to find?

                      --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Noble Cousin!
                      >
                      > Greetings from Solveig!
                      > > Don't know what a pop ribet is (my english is not so good...),
                      > Pop rivets typically have a hollow core and are secured by using a
                      > crimping tool which is similar to a pair of pliers.
                      >
                      > These are pop rivets: http://www.aeroassemblies.com/images/pop/
                      > rivets.jpg
                      > This is a pop rivet gun: http://school.mech.uwa.edu.au/~nscott/
                      > How_to_do_stuff/hand_tools/pop_rivet_tool.jpg
                      >
                      > Your Humble Servant
                      > Solveig Throndardottir
                      > Amateur Scholar
                      >
                    • Solveig Throndardottir
                      Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... You have to visit a real hardware store. You can also purchase them online. You can, with some effort, substitute
                      Message 10 of 12 , Oct 27, 2009
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                        Noble Cousin!

                        Greetings from Solveig!
                        > Yes, that's exactly what they are. The other type of rivets, are
                        > they easy to find?
                        You have to visit a real hardware store. You can also purchase them
                        online. You can, with some effort, substitute penny nails for proper
                        rivets.

                        Here is a link to a rivet company. You can even buy their rivets from
                        amazon.

                        http://www.hansonrivet.com/

                        Be careful that you get cold rivets that are NOT pop rivets. Ideally,
                        you should be trying to match the approximate size of rivets used in
                        real Japanese helmets.

                        Your Humble Servant
                        Solveig Throndardottir
                        Amateur Scholar
                      • Solveig Throndardottir
                        Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! Here is a link for a web page which converts sheet metal gauge thickness to decimal inches and from inches to
                        Message 11 of 12 , Oct 27, 2009
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                          Noble Cousin!

                          Greetings from Solveig! Here is a link for a web page which converts
                          sheet metal gauge thickness to decimal inches and from inches to
                          millimeters. Finally, it has a good drawing of a rivet in use. The
                          flat part of the rivet is placed inside the helmet and a ball pean
                          hammer or other similar tool is used to round the protruding end of
                          the rivet into a dome shape. You will need a hammer and an anvil. A
                          block of lead is also useful to have around.

                          http://www.hansonrivet.com/w93.htm

                          Your Humble Servant
                          Solveig Throndardottir
                          Amateur Scholar






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                        • sekinakagawa@aol.com
                          Muy buen trabajo! Ole! -Sukeie To ask a question, may be a moments shame, but not to ask and remain ignorant, is a life long shame. [Non-text portions of
                          Message 12 of 12 , Nov 4, 2009
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                            Muy buen trabajo! Ole!

                            -Sukeie

                            To ask a question, may be a moments shame,
                            but not to ask and remain ignorant, is a life long shame.


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