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Re: Building a Kamakura Persona

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  • wodeford
    ... My mistake - I misremembered a comic kabuki play as kyogen. I m thinking specifically of a piece called Bo Shibari, and the costume is worn by the master
    Message 1 of 24 , Oct 1, 2009
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      --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...> wrote:

      > As I recall, kyogen tends to fossilize late Muromachi fashions and
      > language while Noh tends to fossilize somewhat earlier fashions and
      > speech.

      My mistake - I misremembered a comic kabuki play as kyogen. I'm thinking specifically of a piece called "Bo Shibari," and the costume is worn by the master of two untrustworthy servants.
      http://www.culturaitalia.it/pico/modules/event/it/event_1118.html?print=true

      Saionji no Hanae
      West Kingdom
    • JL Badgley
      ... I m pretty sure that the Lord in most of those plays wears Edo period garments, but I could be wrong. I *do* think we find nagabakama before the Edo
      Message 2 of 24 , Oct 1, 2009
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        On Thu, Oct 1, 2009 at 8:11 PM, wodeford <wodeford@...> wrote:
        > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...> wrote:
        >
        >> As I recall, kyogen tends to fossilize late Muromachi fashions and
        >> language while Noh tends to fossilize somewhat earlier fashions and
        >> speech.
        >
        > My mistake - I misremembered a comic kabuki play as kyogen. I'm thinking specifically of a piece called "Bo Shibari," and the costume is worn by the master of two untrustworthy servants.
        > http://www.culturaitalia.it/pico/modules/event/it/event_1118.html?print=true
        >
        I'm pretty sure that the Lord in most of those plays wears Edo period
        garments, but I could be wrong. I *do* think we find nagabakama
        before the Edo period, but I don't know how popular they were (or why
        they would be used--probably to show that the wearer could be
        leisurely, initially, but I'm not sure).

        -Ii
      • Solveig Throndardottir
        Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! ... Boshibari is a kyogen play. An interesting side note, kabuki scripts are for some reason called kyogenbon . Noh
        Message 3 of 24 , Oct 1, 2009
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          Noble Cousins!

          Greetings from Solveig!
          > My mistake - I misremembered a comic kabuki play as kyogen. I'm
          > thinking specifically of a piece called "Bo Shibari," and the
          > costume is worn by the master of two untrustworthy servants.
          Boshibari is a kyogen play. An interesting side note, kabuki scripts
          are for some reason called "kyogenbon". Noh scripts are called
          "utaibon". I really should find out what kyogen scripts are called.
          Some time ago, Baron Edward pointed out that the "winged" jacket was
          developed in the sixteenth century and that we have pictures of
          famous people wearing them.

          Your Humble Servant
          Solveig Throndardottir
          Amateur Scholar
        • Solveig Throndardottir
          Ii dono! Greetings from Solveig! Nagabakama show up in early wood block print books of kyogen plays. Nagabakama were well enough established at that point to
          Message 4 of 24 , Oct 1, 2009
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            Ii dono!

            Greetings from Solveig! Nagabakama show up in early wood block print
            books of kyogen plays. Nagabakama were well enough established at
            that point to form part of comic costumes. The fabric patterns of
            kyogen reflect, in my opinion, the aesthetics of the late Muromachi
            period. Kyogen itself dates from at least the time of Ze'ami.

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar
          • JL Badgley
            ... Actually, Bo Shibari is both, and possibly an older story. There is a kyogen, but there is also a comic kabuki done to it as well. I wouldn t be
            Message 5 of 24 , Oct 1, 2009
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              On Thu, Oct 1, 2009 at 9:37 PM, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...> wrote:
              > Greetings from Solveig!
              >> My mistake - I misremembered a comic kabuki play as kyogen. I'm
              >> thinking specifically of a piece called "Bo Shibari," and the
              >> costume is worn by the master of two untrustworthy servants.
              > Boshibari is a kyogen play. An interesting side note, kabuki scripts
              > are for some reason called "kyogenbon". Noh scripts are called
              > "utaibon". I really should find out what kyogen scripts are called.
              > Some time ago, Baron Edward pointed out that the "winged" jacket was
              > developed in the sixteenth century and that we have pictures of
              > famous people wearing them.

              Actually, "Bo Shibari" is both, and possibly an older story. There is
              a kyogen, but there is also a comic kabuki done to it as well. I
              wouldn't be surprised if there was a bunraku play on it as well. It
              isn't as if these stories had any real copyright and had to stay
              within their own genre.

              -Ii
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