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Re: [SCA-JML] How to reconstitute mochiko

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  • Solveig Throndardottir
    Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... I hope that we are talking about the same thing. Dried mochi bricks or disks are the Japanese answer to the
    Message 1 of 17 , Oct 1, 2009
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      Noble Cousin!

      Greetings from Solveig!
      > Thank you Solveig!! I've had some of this stuff for a few years and
      > can't get it to cook right, too hard on the outside and not chewy
      > enough
      > inside. This just might be the trick I've been looking for :-)
      I hope that we are talking about the same thing. Dried mochi bricks
      or disks are the Japanese answer to the marshmallow. You stick them
      on top of an oil stove or any other sort of hot dry griddle. They
      turn brown and eventually split and erupt their innards. I was
      writing about how to make mochi based sweets. The mochiko is
      typically mixed with sugar and water. The stuff is then heated up and
      used to make a variety of sweets.

      That said, please tell me how my description of cooking with mochiko
      works for you and how it can be improved upon.

      Your Humble Servant
      Solveig Throndardottir
      Amateur Scholar
    • Heather Law
      Nope, this is the flour. I just mixed it with water and made it into balls and baked it. I think steaming it first might make it more edible... hopefully!
      Message 2 of 17 , Oct 1, 2009
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        Nope, this is the flour. I just mixed it with water and made it into
        balls and baked it. I think steaming it first might make it more
        edible... hopefully! I'm curious about the mochi bricks or disks, are
        they actually dry or are they sort of "leather hard"? This sounds like
        what I had before I bought the flour, it was a flat square you broke up
        along scored lines and threw in the oven, and it behaved sort of like
        you described. I used to get it at the health food coop.

        Ewinna

        Solveig Throndardottir wrote:
        >
        >
        > Noble Cousin!
        >
        > Greetings from Solveig!
        > > Thank you Solveig!! I've had some of this stuff for a few years and
        > > can't get it to cook right, too hard on the outside and not chewy
        > > enough
        > > inside. This just might be the trick I've been looking for :-)
        > I hope that we are talking about the same thing. Dried mochi bricks
        > or disks are the Japanese answer to the marshmallow. You stick them
        > on top of an oil stove or any other sort of hot dry griddle. They
        > turn brown and eventually split and erupt their innards. I was
        > writing about how to make mochi based sweets. The mochiko is
        > typically mixed with sugar and water. The stuff is then heated up and
        > used to make a variety of sweets.
        >
        > That said, please tell me how my description of cooking with mochiko
        > works for you and how it can be improved upon.
        >
        > Your Humble Servant
        > Solveig Throndardottir
        > Amateur Scholar
        >
        >
      • Solveig Throndardottir
        Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... The steamed mochi is then used as an ingredient in making various mochi based Japanese okashi. Further, sugar is
        Message 3 of 17 , Oct 1, 2009
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          Noble Cousin!

          Greetings from Solveig!

          > Nope, this is the flour. I just mixed it with water and made it into
          > balls and baked it. I think steaming it first might make it more
          > edible... hopefully!

          The steamed mochi is then used as an ingredient in making various
          mochi based Japanese okashi. Further, sugar is often added to the
          flour and water mixture.

          > I'm curious about the mochi bricks or disks, are
          > they actually dry or are they sort of "leather hard"?

          I used to chew on leather when I was in elementary school. Mochi
          bricks are harder than leather. Usually, mochi comes in blocks which
          may be individually wrapped.

          I'm not sure how to interpret your "nope". I really do want to
          conjure up a good description on how to reconstitute mochiko. I
          generally use the granular variety that comes in the white box.

          Your Humble Servant
          Solveig Throndardottir
          Amateur Scholar
        • Heather Law
          I meant Nope, what I have isn t the bricks or disks. It s the flour, which I got in a plastic bag, but I think it s similar to the stuff in the white boxes.
          Message 4 of 17 , Oct 2, 2009
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            I meant "Nope, what I have isn't the bricks or disks." It's the flour,
            which I got in a plastic bag, but I think it's similar to the stuff in
            the white boxes.

            Edwinna

            Solveig Throndardottir wrote:
            >
            >
            > Noble Cousin!
            >
            > Greetings from Solveig!
            >
            > > Nope, this is the flour. I just mixed it with water and made it into
            > > balls and baked it. I think steaming it first might make it more
            > > edible... hopefully!
            >
            > The steamed mochi is then used as an ingredient in making various
            > mochi based Japanese okashi. Further, sugar is often added to the
            > flour and water mixture.
            >
            > > I'm curious about the mochi bricks or disks, are
            > > they actually dry or are they sort of "leather hard"?
            >
            > I used to chew on leather when I was in elementary school. Mochi
            > bricks are harder than leather. Usually, mochi comes in blocks which
            > may be individually wrapped.
            >
            > I'm not sure how to interpret your "nope". I really do want to
            > conjure up a good description on how to reconstitute mochiko. I
            > generally use the granular variety that comes in the white box.
            >
            > Your Humble Servant
            > Solveig Throndardottir
            > Amateur Scholar
            >
            >
          • Solveig Throndardottir
            Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... The stuff in the white boxes is chunky as it is more pulverized than ground. However, it melts/dissolves quickly in
            Message 5 of 17 , Oct 2, 2009
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              Noble Cousin!

              Greetings from Solveig!

              > I meant "Nope, what I have isn't the bricks or disks." It's the
              > flour,
              > which I got in a plastic bag, but I think it's similar to the stuff in
              > the white boxes.

              The stuff in the white boxes is chunky as it is more pulverized than
              ground. However, it melts/dissolves quickly in water.

              Your Humble Servant
              Solveig Throndardottir
              Amateur Scholar
            • wodeford
              ... Koda makes and markets a rice flour under the name Mochiko. It s readily available here in California. http://www.kodafarms.com/product_glutenfree.html
              Message 6 of 17 , Oct 2, 2009
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                --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Heather Law <nlaw001@...> wrote:
                >
                > I meant "Nope, what I have isn't the bricks or disks." It's the flour,
                > which I got in a plastic bag, but I think it's similar to the stuff in
                > the white boxes.

                Koda makes and markets a rice flour under the name Mochiko. It's readily available here in California.
                http://www.kodafarms.com/product_glutenfree.html

                Saionji no Hanae
                West Kingdom
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