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Re: [SCA-JML] Greetings everyone

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  • the.lady.phoenix@gmail.com
    we had a discussion on this topic not that long ago, check either July or August for the discussion. Sara
    Message 1 of 17 , Sep 28, 2009
      we had a discussion on this topic not that long ago, check either July
      or August for the discussion.

      Sara

      On 28/09/2009, Michelle S. <flame_gemron@...> wrote:
      > My name is Kaida, and I am currently on a quest for period Japanese sweets.
      > My Baroness has requested a period baking contest, and, although Japanese
      > cuisine doesn't use baking, she's given me permission to use steam cooking.
      > I've found a few recipies, but I was hoping one of you could point me in the
      > right direction for some research. The internet is sketchy, and I would like
      > some good, sources for my food.
      >
      > Thank you very much.
      >
      > Yours in Service
      >
      > Kaida Morgaine
      >
      >
    • JL Badgley
      ... Well, unfortunately most of the Japanese sweets today appear to be post-period. You are left primarily with different types of mochi--and if you want I
      Message 2 of 17 , Sep 28, 2009
        On Tue, Sep 29, 2009 at 9:30 AM, Michelle S. <flame_gemron@...> wrote:
        > My name is Kaida, and I am currently on a quest for period Japanese sweets. My Baroness has requested a period baking contest, and, although Japanese cuisine doesn't use baking, she's given me permission to use steam cooking. I've found a few recipies, but I was hoping one of you could point me in the right direction for some research. The internet is sketchy, and I would like some good, sources for my food.
        >
        Well, unfortunately most of the Japanese sweets today appear to be
        post-period. You are left primarily with different types of
        mochi--and if you want I can send you a list of different types of
        mochi from around the mid-17th century (reasonably plausible to be
        late 16th century, and I've seen some claims that the source, "Ryori
        Monogatari", was available in earlier editions by 1600, but I haven't
        seen any conclusive evidence of that).

        You also have two options for European desserts that we can show were
        available by 1600: Fios de Ovos (egg threads, aka tamago soumen) and
        candied job's tears (pastilles?).

        There are also a few possibilities such as "Touguwashi"
        (Togashi--Chinese desserts) of speculative origin--something like a
        fried dough cake. My wife, Abe-hime, can possibly give you more on
        that.

        Not quite baked, but here are some other ideas:

        "Eggs" of rice flower with brown sugar inside, served in a savory
        broth. Very nummy. The brown sugar makes me think it was at least a
        post-European contact dish

        Lotus filled with honey and then boiled. The lotus then takes on a
        very sweet, candied taste.

        Fresh fruit.

        "Sake nog" -- aka Tamagozake or Tamago-sake. It is sake, warmed, with
        a beaten egg and either sugar or salt. Quite tasty.

        Hope something there helps.

        -Ii
      • Solveig Throndardottir
        Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... I have several books on traditional Japanese sweets and some information on specifically premodern sweets. Do you
        Message 3 of 17 , Sep 28, 2009
          Noble Cousin!

          Greetings from Solveig!
          > My name is Kaida, and I am currently on a quest for period Japanese
          > sweets. My Baroness has requested a period baking contest, and,
          > although Japanese cuisine doesn't use baking, she's given me
          > permission to use steam cooking. I've found a few recipies, but I
          > was hoping one of you could point me in the right direction for
          > some research. The internet is sketchy, and I would like some good,
          > sources for my food.
          I have several books on traditional Japanese sweets and some
          information on specifically premodern sweets. Do you have any
          particular preferences in terms of difficulty, taste, strange or hard
          to get ingredients, &c.

          Your Humble Servant
          Solveig Throndardottir
          Amateur Scholar
        • Solveig Throndardottir
          Ii dono! Greetings from Solveig! ... I think that you are forgetting about castella which, if I recall correctly, is Portugese which pretty much lands it no
          Message 4 of 17 , Sep 28, 2009
            Ii dono!

            Greetings from Solveig!
            > You also have two options for European desserts that we can show were
            > available by 1600: Fios de Ovos (egg threads, aka tamago soumen) and
            > candied job's tears (pastilles?).
            I think that you are forgetting about "castella" which, if I recall
            correctly, is Portugese which pretty much lands it no later than
            around 1638 when the Portugese are booted out of Japan.
            > There are also a few possibilities such as "Touguwashi"
            > (Togashi--Chinese desserts) of speculative origin--something like a
            > fried dough cake. My wife, Abe-hime, can possibly give you more on
            > that.
            This is a large genre. A fun example is kinton which consists of a
            bunch of thin multicolored strands sort of heaped into a ball.

            > Fresh fruit.

            Very technically, the etymology of kashi 菓子 (sweets) is fruit and
            nuts. There is a rather fun sweet that can be made from 50% ground
            steamed chestnut (just buy commercial chestnut flower) and 50% sugar.
            If you use dry chestnut flour, then you need to add a small amount of
            water to stick the stuff together into a dough. The dough is formed
            into balls and placed in cooking cloth (100% cotton) or cheese cloth
            which is twisted at one end. After unwrapping the ball, pinch the end
            which was twisted with your fingers. The result will look somewhat
            like a chestnut. This is the simplest version of this particular
            sweet. Chestnuts date from prehistoric times in Japan and sugar shows
            up pretty early. There are some more complicated versions of this
            recipe which create a sort of sheen on the surface of the faux
            chestnuts.

            You can make one of the very few things that Sei Shonagon said that
            she liked. It is, believe it or not, shaved ice garnished with
            reduced Boston Ivy sap. You can substitute honey or possibly maple
            syrup for the reduced sap. Yes, snow cones are period in Japan. Well,
            actually, they would be served in a bowl of some sort.

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar
          • Solveig Throndardottir
            Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! You can buy boxes or sacks of ground mochi at your local asian food store. When you get the stuff, the directions on the
            Message 5 of 17 , Sep 28, 2009
              Noble Cousin!

              Greetings from Solveig! You can buy boxes or sacks of ground mochi at
              your local asian food store. When you get the stuff, the directions
              on the box will tell you to mix it with a specific amount of water.
              So far, so good. However, several sets of directions that I have
              encountered failed to work. Here is how I got it to work. Buy 100%
              cotton chef's cloth and a steamer insert. Preferably, your steamer
              insert will not have a central piston. Once you get to the steaming
              step do the following:

              1. Put your steamer insert into a large pot which has a lid.
              2. Add water to the pot up to the bottom of the steamer insert, but
              no farther.
              3. Drape your chef's cloth across the steamer insert with a good
              margin on all sides.
              4. Put mochi mixture into the chef's cloth.
              5. Wrap the chef's cloth over the mixture.
              6. Cover, but make sure that a steam vent is open.
              7. Cook until desired consistency is obtained.

              Now for the second trick.

              The second trick involves parchment paper. If I recall correctly,
              that is what we wound up using. The trick is to form the hot steamy
              and very sticky reconstituted mochi into something artistic. It turns
              out that parchment paper has release characteristics which make this
              a lot easier than just about anything that you see in books.

              Your Humble Servant
              Solveig Throndardottir
              Amateur Scholar
            • Michelle S.
              Honored friends, I thank you all for your help. Ii san, I was planning on making mochi of some kind, possibly red bean or chestnut mochi. I would very much
              Message 6 of 17 , Sep 29, 2009
                Honored friends,

                I thank you all for your help.

                Ii san, I was planning on making mochi of some kind, possibly red bean or chestnut mochi. I would very much appreciate your help with possible types to make.

                Solveig san, the chestnut sweet you mentioned sound interesting, I may try to make those and see how they come out. I would like to make the treats as authentic as possible, though that may require some interesting ingredients.

                Again, thank you, everyone.

                Kaida Morgaine

                >
                > Ii dono!
                >
                > Greetings from Solveig!
                > > You also have two options for European desserts that we can show were
                > > available by 1600: Fios de Ovos (egg threads, aka tamago soumen) and
                > > candied job's tears (pastilles?).
                > I think that you are forgetting about "castella" which, if I recall
                > correctly, is Portugese which pretty much lands it no later than
                > around 1638 when the Portugese are booted out of Japan.
                > > There are also a few possibilities such as "Touguwashi"
                > > (Togashi--Chinese desserts) of speculative origin--something like a
                > > fried dough cake. My wife, Abe-hime, can possibly give you more on
                > > that.
                > This is a large genre. A fun example is kinton which consists of a
                > bunch of thin multicolored strands sort of heaped into a ball.
                >
                > > Fresh fruit.
                >
                > Very technically, the etymology of kashi è"子 (sweets) is fruit and
                > nuts. There is a rather fun sweet that can be made from 50% ground
                > steamed chestnut (just buy commercial chestnut flower) and 50% sugar.
                > If you use dry chestnut flour, then you need to add a small amount of
                > water to stick the stuff together into a dough. The dough is formed
                > into balls and placed in cooking cloth (100% cotton) or cheese cloth
                > which is twisted at one end. After unwrapping the ball, pinch the end
                > which was twisted with your fingers. The result will look somewhat
                > like a chestnut. This is the simplest version of this particular
                > sweet. Chestnuts date from prehistoric times in Japan and sugar shows
                > up pretty early. There are some more complicated versions of this
                > recipe which create a sort of sheen on the surface of the faux
                > chestnuts.
                >
                > You can make one of the very few things that Sei Shonagon said that
                > she liked. It is, believe it or not, shaved ice garnished with
                > reduced Boston Ivy sap. You can substitute honey or possibly maple
                > syrup for the reduced sap. Yes, snow cones are period in Japan. Well,
                > actually, they would be served in a bowl of some sort.
                >
                > Your Humble Servant
                > Solveig Throndardottir
                > Amateur Scholar
                >
              • Ellen Badgley
                Dear Kaida-dono, Chiming in a bit late, but my husband Ii-dono has summed up most of my knowledge on the subject. As Solveig-dono has said as well, fruits and
                Message 7 of 17 , Sep 29, 2009
                  Dear Kaida-dono,

                  Chiming in a bit late, but my husband Ii-dono has summed up most of my
                  knowledge on the subject. As Solveig-dono has said as well, fruits and nuts
                  are entirely appropriate (if rather pedestrian) as period sweets
                  (and chestnuts, especially, have been eaten in Japan since the early days,
                  yes.)

                  The period snowcones idea would also be a fun one to do, if a bit more
                  difficult logistics-wise!

                  - Abe Akirakeiko

                  On Tue, Sep 29, 2009 at 11:28 AM, Michelle S. <flame_gemron@...>wrote:

                  >
                  >
                  > Honored friends,
                  >
                  > I thank you all for your help.
                  >
                  > Ii san, I was planning on making mochi of some kind, possibly red bean or
                  > chestnut mochi. I would very much appreciate your help with possible types
                  > to make.
                  >
                  > Solveig san, the chestnut sweet you mentioned sound interesting, I may try
                  > to make those and see how they come out. I would like to make the treats as
                  > authentic as possible, though that may require some interesting ingredients.
                  >
                  >
                  > Again, thank you, everyone.
                  >
                  > Kaida Morgaine
                  >
                  > >
                  > > Ii dono!
                  > >
                  > > Greetings from Solveig!
                  > > > You also have two options for European desserts that we can show were
                  > > > available by 1600: Fios de Ovos (egg threads, aka tamago soumen) and
                  > > > candied job's tears (pastilles?).
                  > > I think that you are forgetting about "castella" which, if I recall
                  > > correctly, is Portugese which pretty much lands it no later than
                  > > around 1638 when the Portugese are booted out of Japan.
                  > > > There are also a few possibilities such as "Touguwashi"
                  > > > (Togashi--Chinese desserts) of speculative origin--something like a
                  > > > fried dough cake. My wife, Abe-hime, can possibly give you more on
                  > > > that.
                  > > This is a large genre. A fun example is kinton which consists of a
                  > > bunch of thin multicolored strands sort of heaped into a ball.
                  > >
                  > > > Fresh fruit.
                  > >
                  > > Very technically, the etymology of kashi è "å­ (sweets) is fruit and
                  > > nuts. There is a rather fun sweet that can be made from 50% ground
                  > > steamed chestnut (just buy commercial chestnut flower) and 50% sugar.
                  > > If you use dry chestnut flour, then you need to add a small amount of
                  > > water to stick the stuff together into a dough. The dough is formed
                  > > into balls and placed in cooking cloth (100% cotton) or cheese cloth
                  > > which is twisted at one end. After unwrapping the ball, pinch the end
                  > > which was twisted with your fingers. The result will look somewhat
                  > > like a chestnut. This is the simplest version of this particular
                  > > sweet. Chestnuts date from prehistoric times in Japan and sugar shows
                  > > up pretty early. There are some more complicated versions of this
                  > > recipe which create a sort of sheen on the surface of the faux
                  > > chestnuts.
                  > >
                  > > You can make one of the very few things that Sei Shonagon said that
                  > > she liked. It is, believe it or not, shaved ice garnished with
                  > > reduced Boston Ivy sap. You can substitute honey or possibly maple
                  > > syrup for the reduced sap. Yes, snow cones are period in Japan. Well,
                  > > actually, they would be served in a bowl of some sort.
                  > >
                  > > Your Humble Servant
                  > > Solveig Throndardottir
                  > > Amateur Scholar
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Elaine Koogler
                  Oh, I dunno. I entered a Turkish sharbat in a brewing competition last year. Took along a small ice crusher/shaver and used a portable battery to plug it
                  Message 8 of 17 , Sep 29, 2009
                    Oh, I dunno. I entered a Turkish sharbat in a brewing competition last
                    year. Took along a small ice crusher/shaver and used a portable battery
                    to plug it into. I served the cherry sharbat over shaved ice...turned
                    out I won the competition, though I was accused of winning because the
                    temperature that day hovered around 100!!

                    Having the battery wasn't difficult for me because my husband uses it
                    when we are camping to power his CPAP machine. Ask around...you may
                    find one quite easily!

                    Kiri

                    Ellen Badgley wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Dear Kaida-dono,
                    >
                    > Chiming in a bit late, but my husband Ii-dono has summed up most of my
                    > knowledge on the subject. As Solveig-dono has said as well, fruits and
                    > nuts
                    > are entirely appropriate (if rather pedestrian) as period sweets
                    > (and chestnuts, especially, have been eaten in Japan since the early days,
                    > yes.)
                    >
                    > The period snowcones idea would also be a fun one to do, if a bit more
                    > difficult logistics-wise!
                    >
                    > - Abe Akirakeiko
                    >
                    > On Tue, Sep 29, 2009 at 11:28 AM, Michelle S. <flame_gemron@...
                    > <mailto:flame_gemron%40yahoo.com>>wrote:
                    >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Honored friends,
                    > >
                    > > I thank you all for your help.
                    > >
                    > > Ii san, I was planning on making mochi of some kind, possibly red
                    > bean or
                    > > chestnut mochi. I would very much appreciate your help with possible
                    > types
                    > > to make.
                    > >
                    > > Solveig san, the chestnut sweet you mentioned sound interesting, I
                    > may try
                    > > to make those and see how they come out. I would like to make the
                    > treats as
                    > > authentic as possible, though that may require some interesting
                    > ingredients.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Again, thank you, everyone.
                    > >
                    > > Kaida Morgaine
                    > >
                    > > >
                    > > > Ii dono!
                    > > >
                    > > > Greetings from Solveig!
                    > > > > You also have two options for European desserts that we can show
                    > were
                    > > > > available by 1600: Fios de Ovos (egg threads, aka tamago soumen) and
                    > > > > candied job's tears (pastilles?).
                    > > > I think that you are forgetting about "castella" which, if I recall
                    > > > correctly, is Portugese which pretty much lands it no later than
                    > > > around 1638 when the Portugese are booted out of Japan.
                    > > > > There are also a few possibilities such as "Touguwashi"
                    > > > > (Togashi--Chinese desserts) of speculative origin--something like a
                    > > > > fried dough cake. My wife, Abe-hime, can possibly give you more on
                    > > > > that.
                    > > > This is a large genre. A fun example is kinton which consists of a
                    > > > bunch of thin multicolored strands sort of heaped into a ball.
                    > > >
                    > > > > Fresh fruit.
                    > > >
                    > > > Very technically, the etymology of kashi è "å­ (sweets) is fruit and
                    > > > nuts. There is a rather fun sweet that can be made from 50% ground
                    > > > steamed chestnut (just buy commercial chestnut flower) and 50% sugar.
                    > > > If you use dry chestnut flour, then you need to add a small amount of
                    > > > water to stick the stuff together into a dough. The dough is formed
                    > > > into balls and placed in cooking cloth (100% cotton) or cheese cloth
                    > > > which is twisted at one end. After unwrapping the ball, pinch the end
                    > > > which was twisted with your fingers. The result will look somewhat
                    > > > like a chestnut. This is the simplest version of this particular
                    > > > sweet. Chestnuts date from prehistoric times in Japan and sugar shows
                    > > > up pretty early. There are some more complicated versions of this
                    > > > recipe which create a sort of sheen on the surface of the faux
                    > > > chestnuts.
                    > > >
                    > > > You can make one of the very few things that Sei Shonagon said that
                    > > > she liked. It is, believe it or not, shaved ice garnished with
                    > > > reduced Boston Ivy sap. You can substitute honey or possibly maple
                    > > > syrup for the reduced sap. Yes, snow cones are period in Japan. Well,
                    > > > actually, they would be served in a bowl of some sort.
                    > > >
                    > > > Your Humble Servant
                    > > > Solveig Throndardottir
                    > > > Amateur Scholar
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >

                    --
                    "/It is only with the heart /that one can see clearly; what is essential
                    is invisible to the eye."
                    --Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, /The Little Prince/


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Solveig Throndardottir
                    Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! It turns out that chestnut flour is a common ingredient in Italian cuisine. You can buy the stuff online. There is an
                    Message 9 of 17 , Sep 29, 2009
                      Noble Cousin!

                      Greetings from Solveig! It turns out that chestnut flour is a common
                      ingredient in Italian cuisine. You can buy the stuff online. There is
                      an Italian food store in Syracuse which stocks the stuff. It's a lot
                      easier than steaming the chestnuts. Anyway. The recipe is 1 part
                      sugar to 1 part chestnut flour with enough water to knead the stuff
                      together. Use as little water as you can get away with.

                      Your Humble Servant
                      Solveig Throndardottir
                      Amateur Scholar
                    • Heather Law
                      Thank you Solveig!! I ve had some of this stuff for a few years and can t get it to cook right, too hard on the outside and not chewy enough inside. This
                      Message 10 of 17 , Sep 30, 2009
                        Thank you Solveig!! I've had some of this stuff for a few years and
                        can't get it to cook right, too hard on the outside and not chewy enough
                        inside. This just might be the trick I've been looking for :-)

                        Edwinna

                        Solveig Throndardottir wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > Noble Cousin!
                        >
                        > Greetings from Solveig! You can buy boxes or sacks of ground mochi at
                        > your local asian food store. When you get the stuff, the directions
                        > on the box will tell you to mix it with a specific amount of water.
                        > So far, so good. However, several sets of directions that I have
                        > encountered failed to work. Here is how I got it to work. Buy 100%
                        > cotton chef's cloth and a steamer insert. Preferably, your steamer
                        > insert will not have a central piston. Once you get to the steaming
                        > step do the following:
                        >
                        > 1. Put your steamer insert into a large pot which has a lid.
                        > 2. Add water to the pot up to the bottom of the steamer insert, but
                        > no farther.
                        > 3. Drape your chef's cloth across the steamer insert with a good
                        > margin on all sides.
                        > 4. Put mochi mixture into the chef's cloth.
                        > 5. Wrap the chef's cloth over the mixture.
                        > 6. Cover, but make sure that a steam vent is open.
                        > 7. Cook until desired consistency is obtained.
                        >
                        > Now for the second trick.
                        >
                        > The second trick involves parchment paper. If I recall correctly,
                        > that is what we wound up using. The trick is to form the hot steamy
                        > and very sticky reconstituted mochi into something artistic. It turns
                        > out that parchment paper has release characteristics which make this
                        > a lot easier than just about anything that you see in books.
                        >
                        > Your Humble Servant
                        > Solveig Throndardottir
                        > Amateur Scholar
                        >
                        >
                      • Solveig Throndardottir
                        Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... I hope that we are talking about the same thing. Dried mochi bricks or disks are the Japanese answer to the
                        Message 11 of 17 , Oct 1, 2009
                          Noble Cousin!

                          Greetings from Solveig!
                          > Thank you Solveig!! I've had some of this stuff for a few years and
                          > can't get it to cook right, too hard on the outside and not chewy
                          > enough
                          > inside. This just might be the trick I've been looking for :-)
                          I hope that we are talking about the same thing. Dried mochi bricks
                          or disks are the Japanese answer to the marshmallow. You stick them
                          on top of an oil stove or any other sort of hot dry griddle. They
                          turn brown and eventually split and erupt their innards. I was
                          writing about how to make mochi based sweets. The mochiko is
                          typically mixed with sugar and water. The stuff is then heated up and
                          used to make a variety of sweets.

                          That said, please tell me how my description of cooking with mochiko
                          works for you and how it can be improved upon.

                          Your Humble Servant
                          Solveig Throndardottir
                          Amateur Scholar
                        • Heather Law
                          Nope, this is the flour. I just mixed it with water and made it into balls and baked it. I think steaming it first might make it more edible... hopefully!
                          Message 12 of 17 , Oct 1, 2009
                            Nope, this is the flour. I just mixed it with water and made it into
                            balls and baked it. I think steaming it first might make it more
                            edible... hopefully! I'm curious about the mochi bricks or disks, are
                            they actually dry or are they sort of "leather hard"? This sounds like
                            what I had before I bought the flour, it was a flat square you broke up
                            along scored lines and threw in the oven, and it behaved sort of like
                            you described. I used to get it at the health food coop.

                            Ewinna

                            Solveig Throndardottir wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > Noble Cousin!
                            >
                            > Greetings from Solveig!
                            > > Thank you Solveig!! I've had some of this stuff for a few years and
                            > > can't get it to cook right, too hard on the outside and not chewy
                            > > enough
                            > > inside. This just might be the trick I've been looking for :-)
                            > I hope that we are talking about the same thing. Dried mochi bricks
                            > or disks are the Japanese answer to the marshmallow. You stick them
                            > on top of an oil stove or any other sort of hot dry griddle. They
                            > turn brown and eventually split and erupt their innards. I was
                            > writing about how to make mochi based sweets. The mochiko is
                            > typically mixed with sugar and water. The stuff is then heated up and
                            > used to make a variety of sweets.
                            >
                            > That said, please tell me how my description of cooking with mochiko
                            > works for you and how it can be improved upon.
                            >
                            > Your Humble Servant
                            > Solveig Throndardottir
                            > Amateur Scholar
                            >
                            >
                          • Solveig Throndardottir
                            Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... The steamed mochi is then used as an ingredient in making various mochi based Japanese okashi. Further, sugar is
                            Message 13 of 17 , Oct 1, 2009
                              Noble Cousin!

                              Greetings from Solveig!

                              > Nope, this is the flour. I just mixed it with water and made it into
                              > balls and baked it. I think steaming it first might make it more
                              > edible... hopefully!

                              The steamed mochi is then used as an ingredient in making various
                              mochi based Japanese okashi. Further, sugar is often added to the
                              flour and water mixture.

                              > I'm curious about the mochi bricks or disks, are
                              > they actually dry or are they sort of "leather hard"?

                              I used to chew on leather when I was in elementary school. Mochi
                              bricks are harder than leather. Usually, mochi comes in blocks which
                              may be individually wrapped.

                              I'm not sure how to interpret your "nope". I really do want to
                              conjure up a good description on how to reconstitute mochiko. I
                              generally use the granular variety that comes in the white box.

                              Your Humble Servant
                              Solveig Throndardottir
                              Amateur Scholar
                            • Heather Law
                              I meant Nope, what I have isn t the bricks or disks. It s the flour, which I got in a plastic bag, but I think it s similar to the stuff in the white boxes.
                              Message 14 of 17 , Oct 2, 2009
                                I meant "Nope, what I have isn't the bricks or disks." It's the flour,
                                which I got in a plastic bag, but I think it's similar to the stuff in
                                the white boxes.

                                Edwinna

                                Solveig Throndardottir wrote:
                                >
                                >
                                > Noble Cousin!
                                >
                                > Greetings from Solveig!
                                >
                                > > Nope, this is the flour. I just mixed it with water and made it into
                                > > balls and baked it. I think steaming it first might make it more
                                > > edible... hopefully!
                                >
                                > The steamed mochi is then used as an ingredient in making various
                                > mochi based Japanese okashi. Further, sugar is often added to the
                                > flour and water mixture.
                                >
                                > > I'm curious about the mochi bricks or disks, are
                                > > they actually dry or are they sort of "leather hard"?
                                >
                                > I used to chew on leather when I was in elementary school. Mochi
                                > bricks are harder than leather. Usually, mochi comes in blocks which
                                > may be individually wrapped.
                                >
                                > I'm not sure how to interpret your "nope". I really do want to
                                > conjure up a good description on how to reconstitute mochiko. I
                                > generally use the granular variety that comes in the white box.
                                >
                                > Your Humble Servant
                                > Solveig Throndardottir
                                > Amateur Scholar
                                >
                                >
                              • Solveig Throndardottir
                                Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... The stuff in the white boxes is chunky as it is more pulverized than ground. However, it melts/dissolves quickly in
                                Message 15 of 17 , Oct 2, 2009
                                  Noble Cousin!

                                  Greetings from Solveig!

                                  > I meant "Nope, what I have isn't the bricks or disks." It's the
                                  > flour,
                                  > which I got in a plastic bag, but I think it's similar to the stuff in
                                  > the white boxes.

                                  The stuff in the white boxes is chunky as it is more pulverized than
                                  ground. However, it melts/dissolves quickly in water.

                                  Your Humble Servant
                                  Solveig Throndardottir
                                  Amateur Scholar
                                • wodeford
                                  ... Koda makes and markets a rice flour under the name Mochiko. It s readily available here in California. http://www.kodafarms.com/product_glutenfree.html
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Oct 2, 2009
                                    --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Heather Law <nlaw001@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > I meant "Nope, what I have isn't the bricks or disks." It's the flour,
                                    > which I got in a plastic bag, but I think it's similar to the stuff in
                                    > the white boxes.

                                    Koda makes and markets a rice flour under the name Mochiko. It's readily available here in California.
                                    http://www.kodafarms.com/product_glutenfree.html

                                    Saionji no Hanae
                                    West Kingdom
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