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Re: [SCA-JML] Re: New all the way around

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  • Solveig Throndardottir
    Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! 1. Pretty much ALL Kurosawa movies are well worth seeing. 2. In addition to Baron Effingham s site (already cited) you
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 9, 2009
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      Noble Cousin!

      Greetings from Solveig!

      1. Pretty much ALL Kurosawa movies are well worth seeing.
      2. In addition to Baron Effingham's site (already cited) you should
      also check out the stuff on http://www.yamakaminari.com/ Sir Ogami
      produces functional SCA helmets and armor which are patterned after
      historical pieces.
      3. If you are at all able to, go to a museum which actually has
      Japanese armor on display. For example, the Smithsonian.
      4. Finally, if you don't mind books written in Japanese, there are
      some fine profusely illustrated books out there which can be obtained
      through Amazon's Japanese storefront or possibly found at a research
      library. Various people here can recommend books to take a look at.

      Your Humble Servant
      Solveig Throndardottir
      Amateur Scholar
    • Loujaue McPherson
      I know Lucas lifted a lot from japanese culture but I didnt know the name of the movie, thanks I will get it.  This is good information.  Its showing me that
      Message 2 of 12 , Sep 9, 2009
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        I know Lucas lifted a lot from japanese culture but I didnt know the name of the movie, thanks I will get it.  This is good information.  Its showing me that I am going in the right direction.  I thank you for the help! 

        Any comments on the name?

        --- On Wed, 9/9/09, wodeford <wodeford@...> wrote:

        From: wodeford <wodeford@...>
        Subject: [SCA-JML] Re: New all the way around
        To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, September 9, 2009, 9:29 PM






         





        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups .com, "loujaue" <loujaue@... > wrote:



        > I am also a member of the 501st for those of you that know what that is. LFL has black Samurai armor ok display on different web sites. Looks like that was where they got the concept for the big man in black. Is that a good model to work from?



        I had to Google it. If you are referring to Darth Vader, it is a well known fact that George Lucas shamelessly lifted a great deal from Akira Kurosawa's "The Hidden Fortress." (If you have not seen it, rent it immediately. It's terrific!) Vader's helmet is an amalgam of a kabuto and a WWII German coal scuttle helmet.



        If you want to make period correct armor, please go immediately to http://www.sengokud aimyo.com/ katchu/index. html



        Read it. Think about it. Then go back and read it again. And think about it some more: there's a LOT of information in there and it's easy to become overwhelmed.



        Welcome!

        Saionji no Hanae

        West Kingdom































        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • JL Badgley
        ... Yamamoto = Awesome! Sadataro = ? Where are you getting this? Taro/Tarou is great for this position, but the Sada seems odd. Hikaru = As in Hikaru
        Message 3 of 12 , Sep 9, 2009
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          On Thu, Sep 10, 2009 at 10:58 AM, Loujaue McPherson <loujaue@...> wrote:
          > I know Lucas lifted a lot from japanese culture but I didnt know the name of the movie, thanks I will get it.  This is good information.  Its showing me that I am going in the right direction.  I thank you for the help!
          >
          > Any comments on the name?

          Yamamoto = Awesome!
          Sadataro = ? Where are you getting this? "Taro/Tarou" is great for
          this position, but the "Sada" seems odd.
          Hikaru = As in "Hikaru Genji"? The kanji for "Hikaru" is used as a
          name, but this construction just doesn't seem right. Are you going
          for a masculine or feminine name?

          What about: Yamamoto Tarou Sadaaki? That uses those elements but we
          could potentially justify them more. Depends on if you want the sound
          or meaning.


          -Ii
        • Solveig Throndardottir
          Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! Mostly what Ii dono said. If you also wish to express affiliation with the clan (uji) that the fictitious Shining Genji
          Message 4 of 12 , Sep 10, 2009
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            Noble Cousin!

            Greetings from Solveig!

            Mostly what Ii dono said. If you also wish to express affiliation
            with the clan (uji) that the fictitious Shining Genji was booted
            into, then you can stick 源 GEN in front of 太郎 Tarou to produce
            源太郎 Gentarou. Incidentally, there must be at least a dozen
            romanization systems out there. At least it seems that way. Ever
            since Japanese word processors hit the market, Japanese have tended
            to use what some Western scholars distainfully call "warudopuro
            Japanese". Basically, the way it works is to phonetically write
            Japanese with Roman letters which correspond to the standard Japanese
            kana chart. Thus, long (double length) O is written with either OO or
            OU depending on how it would be written with Japanese phonetic (kana)
            characters. The O in Tarou is long and is pronounced more or less
            like the O in oat or boat. Regardless, it's Tarou in wadopuro
            Japanese kana. The Hepburn system of Romanization is practically a
            minor deity to older Western scholars of Japan. However, you need to
            be able to type letters with macrons in order to use it. Thus, 太郎
            = Tarou = Tarō, but not Taro. Just to make things more confusing, you
            can sometimes run into long O written as Oh.

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar
          • Jeanel Walker
            Konnichi wa I came across something I find very interesting and need and thought that someone out there might be looking for some similar information...it just
            Message 5 of 12 , Sep 10, 2009
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              Konnichi wa
              I came across something I find very interesting and need and thought that someone out there might be looking for some similar information...it just down right cool

              this kid made his own Jomon- era pit dwelligs

              http://www.coolpicturegallery.net/?p=1556

              on another note dose anyone have any ideas how to make an authentic Japanese tent?
              I would like to use bamboo ...i dont mind tieing the long parts to the top of my durango

              Domo Arigato Godzaimasu
              May the joy of your past be the worst of your tomorrows!!!
              Jeanel Walker aka Eilionora "Takinaga" of Kisimull
              http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg208/brytephyre/Takinagadevisesm.jpg
              http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg208/brytephyre/Eilionoriadevicesm.jpg






















              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • JL Badgley
              ... Pit-dwelling--awesome! Now, to find out how to do it at Pennsic (sandbags so that you build the pit up ?) For a Japanese style curtain-tent, the bamboo
              Message 6 of 12 , Sep 10, 2009
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                On Thu, Sep 10, 2009 at 9:07 PM, Jeanel Walker <brytephyre@...> wrote:
                > Konnichi wa
                > I came across something I find very interesting and need and thought that someone out there might be looking for some similar information...it just down right cool
                >
                > this kid made his own Jomon- era pit dwelligs
                >
                > http://www.coolpicturegallery.net/?p=1556
                >
                > on another note dose anyone have any ideas how to make an authentic Japanese tent?
                > I would like to use bamboo ...i dont mind tieing the long parts to the top of my durango
                >
                Pit-dwelling--awesome! Now, to find out how to do it at Pennsic
                (sandbags so that you build the pit "up"?)

                For a Japanese style curtain-tent, the bamboo poles usually seem to
                run in simple sqares. So you have a square "U" shape every "bay" of
                the tent. These are connected at the sides by bamboo poles for the
                basics. Next, you add a ridge pole down the center, with supports in
                the middle of the structure. I assume there are ropes to hold this
                thing up, before the curtain goes on, but can't recall. The curtain
                then goes over it, and you have two ropes running the length of the
                curtain tyeing down at either end, and I think ropes that go over
                cross-ways. Why it doesn't just fall over probably has something to
                do with something I learned in Boy Scouts but can't think of how to
                apply here, yet. Regardless, this is meant as a temporary sunshade,
                and I've seen no evidence it was meant to stand up to any real winds.

                Other than that, I've not seen much in the way of tentage.

                -Ii
              • Solveig Throndardottir
                Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... There are several people around here who know how to make an akunoya which is the closest that you will come to a
                Message 7 of 12 , Sep 10, 2009
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                  Noble Cousin!

                  Greetings from Solveig!
                  > on another note dose anyone have any ideas how to make an authentic
                  > Japanese tent?
                  > I would like to use bamboo ...i dont mind tieing the long parts to
                  > the top of my durango
                  There are several people around here who know how to make an akunoya
                  which is the closest that you will come to a Japanese tent. They were
                  typically used for garden parties. Huge akunoya were also set up for
                  the interment ceremonies of the Showa emperor. Japan never really had
                  a tent culture. Japanese geography just doesn't work well for
                  migratory hunter gatherer societies. Japan did have a very prosperous
                  hunter gatherer society during the Jomon period, but they were pretty
                  much a sedentary society exploiting fishing, shellfish collecting,
                  and some opportunistic hunting. If you can work out the logistics, I
                  strongly recommend emulating the "yashiki" which Saiaiko hime uses at
                  Pennsic. It is based on a commercial carport frame and can be stored
                  in a small trailer. Please check it out at http://yamakaminari.com
                  If I recall correctly, Rokurou dono went to a lot of work to come up
                  with a recreation of an akunoya which uses Japanese joinery. The last
                  time I saw images of his work, it did not particularly much look like
                  an akunoya yet. This is because despite the careful attention to
                  internal joinery, the external canvas shell had not yet been
                  developed to emulate an akunoya. The roof and sides of an akunoya
                  should generally have wide and very colorful stripes, and the roof
                  should be held down by a transversal split rope. Last seen, his
                  akunoya had a pure white shell. In general you do not want to do this
                  as in a Shinto context this suggests a death house. Buddhist death
                  festivities in Japan employ black and white vertical stripes, so that
                  is not recommended either.

                  Your Humble Servant
                  Solveig Throndardottir
                  Amateur Scholar
                • Solveig Throndardottir
                  Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! Here you can take a look at some akunoya: http://www.demoivre.org/Japan/akunoya/ Your Humble Servant Solveig
                  Message 8 of 12 , Sep 10, 2009
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                    Noble Cousins!

                    Greetings from Solveig! Here you can take a look at some akunoya:

                    http://www.demoivre.org/Japan/akunoya/

                    Your Humble Servant
                    Solveig Throndardottir
                    Amateur Scholar
                  • Loujaue McPherson
                    Im glad I asked!!  Ok now Im slightly confused.  I used this site  http://sengokudaimyo.com/miscellany/miscellany.html to put together what I have.  What
                    Message 9 of 12 , Sep 10, 2009
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                      Im glad I asked!!  Ok now Im slightly confused.  I used this site
                       http://sengokudaimyo.com/miscellany/miscellany.html
                      to put together what I have.  What and I not understanding?

                      --- On Thu, 9/10/09, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...> wrote:

                      From: Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...>
                      Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Re: New all the way around
                      To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Thursday, September 10, 2009, 9:49 AM






                       





                      Noble Cousin!



                      Greetings from Solveig!



                      Mostly what Ii dono said. If you also wish to express affiliation

                      with the clan (uji) that the fictitious Shining Genji was booted

                      into, then you can stick 源 GEN in front of 太郎 Tarou to produce

                      源太郎 Gentarou. Incidentally, there must be at least a dozen

                      romanization systems out there. At least it seems that way. Ever

                      since Japanese word processors hit the market, Japanese have tended

                      to use what some Western scholars distainfully call "warudopuro

                      Japanese". Basically, the way it works is to phonetically write

                      Japanese with Roman letters which correspond to the standard Japanese

                      kana chart. Thus, long (double length) O is written with either OO or

                      OU depending on how it would be written with Japanese phonetic (kana)

                      characters. The O in Tarou is long and is pronounced more or less

                      like the O in oat or boat. Regardless, it's Tarou in wadopuro

                      Japanese kana. The Hepburn system of Romanization is practically a

                      minor deity to older Western scholars of Japan. However, you need to

                      be able to type letters with macrons in order to use it. Thus, 太郎

                      = Tarou = Tarō, but not Taro. Just to make things more confusing, you

                      can sometimes run into long O written as Oh.



                      Your Humble Servant

                      Solveig Throndardottir

                      Amateur Scholar































                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • valgard123
                      ... Greetings fellow 501st member! I m with Rancor Raiders Outpost in Mississippi. I ve been out of the SCA for about 4 years but decided to get involved
                      Message 10 of 12 , Sep 12, 2009
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                        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "loujaue" <loujaue@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hello everyone. I am also new to the SCA and when they mentioned Samurai I heard my calling.
                        >
                        > I have been working on a lot of things since then and I have put together I think a good name. I would like your input and feedback.
                        >
                        > Yamamoto no Sadataro Hikaru
                        >
                        >
                        > I am also working on armor. Im thinking mostly black with silver and red accents. Hows that?
                        >
                        > I am also a member of the 501st for those of you that know what that is. LFL has black Samurai armor ok display on different web sites. Looks like that was where they got the concept for the big man in black. Is that a good model to work from?
                        >

                        Greetings fellow 501st member! I'm with Rancor Raiders Outpost in Mississippi. I've been out of the SCA for about 4 years but decided to get involved again about a month or two ago. I had a lot of fun doing Norse crafts etc., but have enjoyed entering new territory making Japanese stuff.

                        I've been lurking here and other sites for quite a while and it's a great resource with lots of helpful people. As far as color and design, if you have some historical reference for it, it should be fine. Armor can have a lot looser interpretation than is allowed in the 501st.

                        Good luck with your armor!
                        Brad Abel
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