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Re: Introduction - to

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  • wodeford
    ... As respectfully as possible given that I do not know your name, clothing styles evolve over time in medieval Japan. Nobody said, War s over, we must all
    Message 1 of 136 , Aug 13, 2009
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      --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "kinsugi1" <kinsugi@...> wrote:
      > Respectfully, the new member indicated she wished to be a persona from the KAMAKURA period in Japan.
      >
      > Saionji no Hanae's links and her beautiful and carefully-crafted outfit are from the Heian period, prior to the Kamakura.

      As respectfully as possible given that I do not know your name, clothing styles evolve over time in medieval Japan. Nobody said, "War's over, we must all dress this way." If one reads the court diaries from the mid 13th century that I posted to this thread, one will find that the court classes continue to dress as if it's the Heian period.

      Unfortunately, the KCM's "Kamakura" section includes Kamakura, Muromachi AND Momoyama periods and it's not clear unless you do a little digging which styles are from which period. The comments sections don't give dates, which would be really helpful.

      http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/fukusyoku/busou/1.htm is similar to formal Heian costume - except she is not wearing nagabakama. They didn't just disappear overnight. In fact, I have an image from a picture scroll of women walking around in nothing more than nagabakama and kosode and it's a bit later - I'll post what I have when I get home.

      http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/fukusyoku/busou/10.htm is also one of those outfits that represents the Kamakura transitional period well - note how similar the robes are in style and shape to the Heian ones with their brocades and wide square sleeves with open edges. However, since she's not swanning about on polished floors, she has traded her nagabakama for a pair of kyahan (leggings, visible in the line drawing if not on the manniquin).

      > However, upperclass outfits had become significantly more practical for movement (such as walking!), and would be easier for SCA activities.

      I live in a kingdom with a very long camping season, so I timeline surf for outdoor events.
      http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/fukusyoku/busou/30.htm is a 16th century style that works extremely well under field conditions, particularly on a hot day.

      Two sen worth,
      Saionji no Hanae
    • Robert Shroyer
      Did you want woodblock information? Fort Wayne public library used to have a treasure trove on the subject. Hiroda Ujio Sent from my iPhone ... [Non-text
      Message 136 of 136 , Dec 11, 2011
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        Did you want woodblock information? Fort Wayne public library used to have a treasure trove on the subject.

        Hiroda Ujio

        Sent from my iPhone

        On Dec 11, 2011, at 7:41 PM, "Melissa" <mdeann@...> wrote:

        > Hello, I am Artemisia Voltera in the SCA and a member of the Middle Kingdom, Red Spears.
        > I have started getting interested in Japanese Ink Paintings. I am the artist who painted the images for Kimiko that were just recently posted here. I also did two additional images that I entered into the A&S competition.
        > I would like to produce these images so they are more accurate. From the research I was able to find, I like the Ink Paintings from the Muromachi time period. I am in search of help to locate writing on how to produce historically accurate images. From everything from the type of paper and ink, to how to make a seal, what is used as the red ink? for the seal, symbolism, etc.
        >
        > Does anyone on here produce these type of art? If so would you be able to direct me on where is best to look for what I am seeking?
        >
        > Any help would be greatly appriciated. While it might be nice to get the images to look like what would have done back then, I would like to do it accuratly.
        >
        > Thank you for your help
        > Lady Artemisia Voltera
        >
        >


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