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Candy

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  • Bryant Richards
    I was looking up candies and sweets that could have been period for us and ran across, Dragon Beard Candy , several sites say it is over 2000 years old. The
    Message 1 of 14 , Jul 7 12:50 PM
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      I was looking up candies and sweets that could have been period for us and ran across, "Dragon Beard Candy", several sites say it is over 2000 years old. The process to make it seems simple enough, but I have made candy before and as anyone else who has made candy can tell you, even if the process seems simple it doesn't always work out that way.

      Has anyone made this candy or has tasted it?
      This is a good place I found that has a video on how to make it, and sells the candy.
      http://www.yuzumura.com/pc-12-9-bamboo-garden-icy-crispy-dragon-beard-candy.aspx

      By the way anyone heard of White Rabbit Creamy Candy? It isn't period but is made in and sold in china. It came up on my search but I don't think it can be right, one of the ingredients listed is Rabbit Feces.... really?

      In Honor and Service,
      Uesugi no Ryujuichiro Uchiyasu
      Chiburi Household





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Franzi Dickson
      ... White Rabbit is a standard milk candy (there are a billion similar brands of both chewy and hard milk candies available in every Asian grocery store).
      Message 2 of 14 , Jul 7 1:03 PM
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        -----Original Message-----
        >From: Bryant Richards <ninjalikereflex@...>
        >By the way anyone heard of White Rabbit Creamy Candy? It isn't period but is made in and sold in china. It came up on my search but I don't think it can be right, one of the ingredients listed is Rabbit Feces.... really?

        White Rabbit is a standard milk candy (there are a billion similar brands of both chewy and hard milk candies available in every Asian grocery store). That rabbit feces nonsense was added by the most recent anonymous editor of the wikipedia page; the candies are mostly just milk and sugar.

        --Franzi
      • Grant
        I ve had those candies and they are actually really good. I had gotten them from asianfoodgrocer.com but they don t appear to carry them anymore. -Kameyama
        Message 3 of 14 , Jul 7 1:09 PM
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          I've had those candies and they are actually really good.
          I had gotten them from asianfoodgrocer.com but they don't appear to carry them anymore.

          -Kameyama Yoshi
        • Bryant Richards
          ... That is what I had hoped. It seemed to strange to be true, but I have heard some strange things in food, especially asian food so I wanted to make sure
          Message 4 of 14 , Jul 7 4:48 PM
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            >That rabbit feces nonsense was added by the most recent anonymous editor of the wikipedia page

            That is what I had hoped. It seemed to strange to be true, but I have heard some strange things in food, especially asian food so I wanted to make sure first.

            In Honor and Service,
            Uesugi no Ryujuichiro Uchiyasu
            Chiburi Household




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • JL Badgley
            On Wed, Jul 8, 2009 at 2:50 AM, Bryant ... I ve seen it made and tasted it. It is quite good, though I ve no particular evidence of its age or whether it made
            Message 5 of 14 , Jul 7 4:56 PM
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              On Wed, Jul 8, 2009 at 2:50 AM, Bryant
              Richards<ninjalikereflex@...> wrote:
              >
              > Has anyone made this candy or has tasted it?
              > This is a good place I found that has a video on how to make it, and sells the candy.
              > http://www.yuzumura.com/pc-12-9-bamboo-garden-icy-crispy-dragon-beard-candy.aspx
              >
              I've seen it made and tasted it. It is quite good, though I've no
              particular evidence of its age or whether it made it to Japan in our
              period of study.

              -Ii
            • Franzi Dickson
              ... Wikipedia is pretty good overall (in the sense of being factually accurate, not in the sense of being complete, unbiased, or a good source to cite), but if
              Message 6 of 14 , Jul 8 6:31 AM
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                -----Original Message-----
                >From: Bryant Richards <ninjalikereflex@...>
                >>That rabbit feces nonsense was added by the most recent anonymous editor of the wikipedia page
                >That is what I had hoped. It seemed to strange to be true, but I have heard some strange things in food, especially asian food so I wanted to make sure first.

                Wikipedia is pretty good overall (in the sense of being factually accurate, not in the sense of being complete, unbiased, or a good source to cite), but if something looks fishy, I always check the history. If the fishy thing is due to the most recent edit (and especially if that edit is anonymous), you can usually discount it.

                --Franzi
              • luannesews2001
                A little while ago, when there was a problem with milk products from China being contaminated, a lot of Chinese-made candies were pulled, just in case. I
                Message 7 of 14 , Jul 8 7:56 AM
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                  A little while ago, when there was a problem with milk products from China being contaminated, a lot of Chinese-made candies were pulled, just in case. I don't know if there was a problem with White Rabbit or not, but they are currently back on the shelves at my local Asian grocers.

                  --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Grant" <peacesun@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I've had those candies and they are actually really good.
                  > I had gotten them from asianfoodgrocer.com but they don't appear to carry them anymore.
                  >
                  > -Kameyama Yoshi
                  >
                • Solveig Throndardottir
                  Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! There are snack foods of various sorts which can be documented, but the web page you found is highly suspect. ... First
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jul 8 10:11 PM
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                    Noble Cousin!

                    Greetings from Solveig! There are snack foods of various sorts which
                    can be documented, but the web page you found is highly suspect.
                    > Some things really are the stuff of legends. Bamboo Garden Icy-
                    > Crispy Dragon Beard Candy is made using a 2000-year old technique
                    > first introduced to the imperial court in ancient China.
                    >
                    > A skilled candy-maker repeatedly stretches and doubles a small mass
                    > of sugar and maltose until over 8000 fine strands are formed.
                    > Finally, the strands are trimmed and wrapped around finely chopped,
                    > lightly roasted coconut, peanuts and sesame seeds.
                    >
                    First of all, I am pretty sure that the oldest extent Chinese
                    cookbook is considerably younger than 2000 years old. Regardless, I
                    have Japanese cookbooks which describe "togashi" (Chinese candy) and
                    it tends to be rather different than the stuff that this web page
                    describes.

                    I suggest that you experiment with various mochi based confections.
                    Mochi does show up in a book which purports to be the oldest extant
                    Chinese cookbook. It is also one of the staples of the Japanese
                    confectioner.



                    Your Humble Servant
                    Solveig Throndardottir
                    Amateur Scholar
                  • Omi
                    My first post here, and it *would* be about food. ;) Dragon beard candy Well, they were only officially off by a thousand five hundred years or so... *grins*
                    Message 9 of 14 , Jul 11 2:28 PM
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                      My first post here, and it *would* be about food. ;)

                      Dragon beard candy> Well, they were only officially off by a thousand five hundred years or so... *grins* The first official record of the dragon beard candy in its current name and form can be found in the Imperial Records for the emperor Yong Zheng, (Qing dynasty 1723–1735) -- one of his imperial chefs found the technique for making what was previously known as 銀絲糖 (lit. silver thread candy), and presented it to the emperor, who was so pleased, he renamed it dragon beard candy instead. The act of the imperial renaming made it to the official records.

                      Also, if you look hard enough, mentions of the silver thread candy also show up in relation to one of the more notorious emperors during the Ming dynasty -- emperor Zheng De -- around 1505 - 1521. So it's pretty safe to say that it's been around for at least five hundred years. (It is entirely possibly that it has been around unrecorded for ages, though, because cooking in general is not considered worthy of record by the ancient chinese)

                      But if you are bound and determined to look for ancient candies, may i
                      suggest candied fruit or nuts as the simplest option? candied hawthorns
                      are the most obvious example, but really, pretty much any candied fruit
                      would do. plums, mandarins (or clementines), (first records in Song
                      dynasty 1115 - 1234). Roasted nuts are also a distinct possibility --
                      sugar roasted chestnuts, anyone?


                      On a side-note, I would be very interested to know more about the book you wrote about, the one which purports to be the oldest extant chinese cookbook. Which one would that be, please? :) As far as I know, it is difficult to find a historical chinese cookbook outside of the odd mention found in the imperial archives, or anecdote-specific recipes, or recipes with medicinal properties.

                      - omi
                      (goes back to lurking)
                    • Solveig Throndardottir
                      Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... 『斉民要術―現存する最古の料理書』 田中静一 ISBN: 9784639014706 It s from the Southern Song
                      Message 10 of 14 , Jul 11 10:15 PM
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                        Noble Cousin!

                        Greetings from Solveig!
                        > On a side-note, I would be very interested to know more about the
                        > book you wrote about, the one which purports to be the oldest
                        > extant chinese cookbook. Which one would that be, please? :) As far
                        > as I know, it is difficult to find a historical chinese cookbook
                        > outside of the odd mention found in the imperial archives, or
                        > anecdote-specific recipes, or recipes with medicinal properties.
                        『斉民要術―現存する最古の料理書』 田中静一
                        ISBN: 9784639014706
                        It's from the Southern Song Dynasty or some such thing. Regardless,
                        it predates the T'ang Dynasty.

                        Your Humble Servant
                        Solveig Throndardottir
                        Amateur Scholar
                      • JL Badgley
                        On Sun, Jul 12, 2009 at 12:15 PM, Solveig ... Southern Song is during the Mongol period. Tang dynasty - 5 dynasties period - Song - Southern Song/Yuan -
                        Message 11 of 14 , Jul 12 8:27 AM
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                          On Sun, Jul 12, 2009 at 12:15 PM, Solveig
                          Throndardottir<nostrand@...> wrote:
                          > Noble Cousin!
                          >
                          > Greetings from Solveig!
                          >> On a side-note, I would be very interested to know more about the
                          >> book you wrote about, the one which purports to be the oldest
                          >> extant chinese cookbook. Which one would that be, please? :) As far
                          >> as I know, it is difficult to find a historical chinese cookbook
                          >> outside of the odd mention found in the imperial archives, or
                          >> anecdote-specific recipes, or recipes with medicinal properties.
                          > 『』 田中静一
                          > ISBN: 9784639014706
                          > It's from the Southern Song Dynasty or some such thing. Regardless,
                          > it predates the T'ang Dynasty.
                          >
                          Southern Song is during the Mongol period. Tang dynasty -> 5
                          dynasties period -> Song -> Southern Song/Yuan -> Ming. I think you
                          mean the Liu Song dynasty of the era of Northern and Southern courts
                          in China, which is about the right time for the book.

                          -Ii
                        • Omi
                          Hello! Thank you very much! Will try and see if I can have it brought in! :) - omi ... 『斉民要術―現存する最古の料理書』 田中静一 ISBN:
                          Message 12 of 14 , Jul 12 9:27 AM
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                            Hello!

                            Thank you very much! Will try and see if I can have it brought in! :)

                            - omi

                            --- On Sun, 7/12/09, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...> wrote:

                            『斉民要術―現存する最古の料理書』 田中静一
                            ISBN: 9784639014706
                            It's from the Southern Song Dynasty or some such thing. Regardless,
                            it predates the T'ang Dynasty.


                            Your Humble Servant
                            Solveig Throndardottir
                            Amateur Scholar
                          • Solveig Throndardottir
                            Ii dono! Greetings from Solveig! ... You are of course correct. I should have looked it up. It was during the North/South division. Solveig Throndardottir
                            Message 13 of 14 , Jul 12 5:55 PM
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                              Ii dono!

                              Greetings from Solveig!

                              > Southern Song is during the Mongol period. Tang dynasty -> 5
                              > dynasties period -> Song -> Southern Song/Yuan -> Ming. I think you
                              > mean the Liu Song dynasty of the era of Northern and Southern courts
                              > in China, which is about the right time for the book.

                              You are of course correct. I should have looked it up. It was during
                              the North/South division.

                              Solveig Throndardottir
                              Amateur Scholar
                            • Solveig Throndardottir
                              Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... It s in classical Chinese with a translation into modern Japanese and notes in modern Japanese. It has lots of neat
                              Message 14 of 14 , Jul 12 5:58 PM
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                                Noble Cousin!

                                Greetings from Solveig!
                                > 『斉民要術―現存する最古の料理書』 田中静一
                                > ISBN: 9784639014706
                                > It's from the Southern Song Dynasty or some such thing. Regardless,
                                > it predates the T'ang Dynasty.

                                It's in classical Chinese with a translation into modern Japanese and
                                notes in modern Japanese. It has lots of neat foodie stuff in it.

                                Your Humble Servant
                                Solveig Throndardottir
                                Amateur Scholar
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