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Re: [SCA-JML] Life in Academia

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  • the.lady.phoenix@gmail.com
    They don t see the evaluations you do they are Sanatized typed up, and then turned over to the instructor so they can know what students liked and responded
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 1, 2009
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      They don't see the evaluations you do they are "Sanatized" typed up,
      and then turned over to the instructor so they can know what students
      liked and responded to and what they didn't.

      However, I don't belive that they ever do that, I think they say that
      and then hand the forms over to the professor.

      Sara

      On 01/06/2009, Sonny Scott <onesoni@...> wrote:
      >
      > In one class, we were told that the evaluations went to the Dean, and the
      > teacher didn't see them. The next class the teacher ranted for 20 minutes
      > about the poor evaluations he received and tried to defend his persistent
      > tardiness.
      >
      > _______________________________
    • Solveig Throndardottir
      Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... The exact procedure depends upon the school in question. In some schools the professors receive the originals back.
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 2, 2009
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        Noble Cousin!

        Greetings from Solveig!
        > They don't see the evaluations you do they are "Sanatized" typed up,
        > and then turned over to the instructor so they can know what students
        > liked and responded to and what they didn't.
        >
        > However, I don't belive that they ever do that, I think they say that
        > and then hand the forms over to the professor.
        The exact procedure depends upon the school in question. In some
        schools the professors receive the originals back. In others they
        don't. However, disclosing their contents to the administration is a
        common feature of reappointment and tenure at a lot of places.
        Further, a lot of places are demanding to see them during the hiring
        process. This all makes for eviscerating "higher education". The
        book, Grade Inflation, documents studies proving that these tests at
        best measure student anxiety at the end of the academic term. All of
        this motivates professors to reduce student anxiety. The easiest way
        to do this is to water down courses. For example, a tenured professor
        of my acquaintance told me back around 1995 that she had recently
        looked at a test she had been using a decade or so previously. She
        said that she could never give it to the current crop of students
        even though students had previously done well on it.

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • the.lady.phoenix@gmail.com
        sounds as bad as standardized tests in the lower grade levels. Sara
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 2, 2009
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          sounds as bad as standardized tests in the lower grade levels.

          Sara

          On 02/06/2009, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...> wrote:
          > Noble Cousin!
          >
          > Greetings from Solveig!
          >> They don't see the evaluations you do they are "Sanatized" typed up,
          >> and then turned over to the instructor so they can know what students
          >> liked and responded to and what they didn't.
          >>
          >> However, I don't belive that they ever do that, I think they say that
          >> and then hand the forms over to the professor.
          > The exact procedure depends upon the school in question. In some
          > schools the professors receive the originals back. In others they
          > don't. However, disclosing their contents to the administration is a
          > common feature of reappointment and tenure at a lot of places.
          > Further, a lot of places are demanding to see them during the hiring
          > process. This all makes for eviscerating "higher education". The
          > book, Grade Inflation, documents studies proving that these tests at
          > best measure student anxiety at the end of the academic term. All of
          > this motivates professors to reduce student anxiety. The easiest way
          > to do this is to water down courses. For example, a tenured professor
          > of my acquaintance told me back around 1995 that she had recently
          > looked at a test she had been using a decade or so previously. She
          > said that she could never give it to the current crop of students
          > even though students had previously done well on it.
          >
          > Your Humble Servant
          > Solveig Throndardottir
          > Amateur Scholar
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
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