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Miso Soup

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  • Leonora Radovcic
    Greetings. I ve been a long time lurker on this list. Always reading, posting sometimes. I wish to ask for the receipe for Miso soup. I d like to try and
    Message 1 of 15 , Apr 15, 2009
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      Greetings. I've been a long time lurker on this list. Always reading, posting sometimes. I wish to ask for the receipe for Miso soup. I'd like to try and make one on my own. There was a receipe posted not too long ago. But, searching through the Archives would take forever, especially since I can't remember who had posted it. :)

      Would someone be kind enough to post it again? Thanks. =)

      YIS
      Branimira
    • Andrew T Trembley
      ... If you go to the visit your group on the web link at the bottom of the page (reproduced here: ) you ll see a
      Message 2 of 15 , Apr 15, 2009
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        Leonora Radovcic wrote:
        > Greetings. I've been a long time lurker on this list. Always reading, posting sometimes. I wish to ask for the receipe for Miso soup. I'd like to try and make one on my own. There was a receipe posted not too long ago. But, searching through the Archives would take forever, especially since I can't remember who had posted it. :)
        >

        If you go to the "visit your group on the web" link at the bottom of the
        page (reproduced here: <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sca-jml/>) you'll
        see a search blank. Search on "miso" and you'll find a whopping 73
        messages to scan through.

        But that would take forever, wouldn't it.

        andy
      • Franzi Dickson
        It looks like the recent recipe was for instant miso soup balls. What kind of recipe are you looking for and how detailed do you want it to be? Miso soup is
        Message 3 of 15 , Apr 15, 2009
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          It looks like the recent recipe was for instant miso soup balls. What kind of recipe are you looking for and how detailed do you want it to be? Miso soup is just miso paste in standard Japanese cooking stock. Are you asking how to make the stock, how to make miso, how to dry fish (i.e. making the stock really, really from scratch), or just what other ingredients you should add?

          --Franzi
        • JL Badgley
          ... Ditto what Franzi-dono is saying. For plain miso soup, go ahead and look online for myriad recipes. In my experience, the historical Japanese texts don t
          Message 4 of 15 , Apr 15, 2009
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            On Thu, Apr 16, 2009 at 2:30 AM, Franzi Dickson <fdickson@...> wrote:
            > It looks like the recent recipe was for instant miso soup balls.  What kind of recipe are you looking for and how detailed do you want it to be?  Miso soup is just miso paste in standard Japanese cooking stock.  Are you asking how to make the stock, how to make miso, how to dry fish (i.e. making the stock really, really from scratch), or just what other ingredients you should add?

            Ditto what Franzi-dono is saying. For plain miso soup, go ahead and
            look online for myriad recipes. In my experience, the historical
            Japanese texts don't bother telling you how to make miso soup, except
            what to put in it.

            Personally, I've found that making a good dashi broth to start is the
            secret, followed by controlling the temperature of the miso. If you
            boil the miso (or keep it heated for too long) you'll break down the
            flavor. Personally, I like adding fresh miso to individual bowls as I
            pour the dashi over it, but this isn't practical in all cases. Still,
            I think it provides the best miso flavor, imho.


            -Ii
          • booknerd9
            Miso soup is really, really easy. Warm up dashi[1], open up container of miso, scoop in enough miso to taste. While I m not sure what period additions were, I
            Message 5 of 15 , Apr 15, 2009
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              Miso soup is really, really easy. Warm up dashi[1], open up container of miso, scoop in enough miso to taste. While I'm not sure what period additions were, I tend to turn mine into miso ramen and throw in cubed tofu and broccoli. Makes a quick and delicious dinner.


              [1]I use water because, honestly, I can't tell the difference. Probably because the dashi I make is pretty darn weak.
            • Solveig Throndardottir
              Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... It all depends upon how fancy you want to be. I know Japanese guys who will just stick a bit of miso in a bowl and
              Message 6 of 15 , Apr 15, 2009
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                Noble Cousin!

                Greetings from Solveig!
                > Greetings. I've been a long time lurker on this list. Always
                > reading, posting sometimes. I wish to ask for the receipe for Miso
                > soup. I'd like to try and make one on my own. There was a receipe
                > posted not too long ago. But, searching through the Archives would
                > take forever, especially since I can't remember who had posted it. :)

                It all depends upon how fancy you want to be. I know Japanese guys
                who will just stick a bit of miso in a bowl and add hot water. At the
                other extreme of things is the miso soup we made in Chaseki class.
                One time, we even shaved the katsuobushi ourselves from hunks of
                processed katsuo. Our sensei had us used pieces of broken light bulb.
                I asked her what was used before broken light bulbs were around, she
                suggested bits of broken crockery. However, I do believe that there
                is a device similar to a carpenter's plane which is period which can
                be pressed into service.

                Your Humble Servant
                Solveig Throndardottir
                Amateur Scholar






                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Solveig Throndardottir
                Ii dono! Greetings from Solveig! ... Basically, that is the sort of thing that was stressed in chaseki class. We made our own dashi by boiling konbu and katsuo
                Message 7 of 15 , Apr 15, 2009
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                  Ii dono!

                  Greetings from Solveig!

                  > Personally, I've found that making a good dashi broth to start is the
                  > secret, followed by controlling the temperature of the miso. If you
                  > boil the miso (or keep it heated for too long) you'll break down the
                  > flavor.

                  Basically, that is the sort of thing that was stressed in chaseki class.
                  We made our own dashi by boiling konbu and katsuo bushi. Then,
                  after straining the resulting dashi, we added miso. Our sensei was
                  quite explicit that you never ever want to boil miso. Then arranged
                  various items in each of the bowls, and spooned the basic miso
                  shiru into the bowls.

                  > Personally, I like adding fresh miso to individual bowls as I
                  > pour the dashi over it, but this isn't practical in all cases. Still,
                  > I think it provides the best miso flavor, imho.

                  Basically, the principle is similar to the one which you mentioned,
                  but is far more likely to be practical.

                  Your Humble Servant
                  Solveig Throndardottir
                  Amateur Scholar






                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Bryant Richards
                  I seem to remember not very long ago people where talking about what to use to carry stuff while dress in period. I am not sure if this came up, but I imagine
                  Message 8 of 15 , Apr 16, 2009
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                    I seem to remember not very long ago people where talking about what to use to carry stuff while dress in period. I am not sure if this came up, but I imagine you could use Seoi Kago. Not 100 sure if it's period, but I have seen similiar things in period artwork. I just never knew what to call it. I have had trouble finding it and I finally did, at a German Tool manufacture. Yeah go figure, it is like the german version of the black and decker company as far as I can tell, but amongst the power saws and hammers I find Seoi Kago! It's about $40 US but I can't seem to find anywhere on their site if they ship to the USA. But just looking at it it seems easy enough to make... assuming you know how to weave bamboo. Anyway here is the link:

                    http://www.dick.biz/dick/product/717880/detail.jsf

                    In Honor and Service,
                    Uesugi no Ryujuichiro Uchiyasu




                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Edward Boreham
                    Not necessarily what was previously posted but, from Best-Ever Recipes: Japanese and Sushi by Emi Kazuko and Yasuko Fukuoka, Hermes House, London ISBN-13:
                    Message 9 of 15 , Apr 16, 2009
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                      Not necessarily what was previously posted but, from "Best-Ever Recipes: Japanese and Sushi" by Emi Kazuko and Yasuko Fukuoka, Hermes House, London ISBN-13: 978-1-84681-207-1, ISBN-10: 1-84681-207-0,
                      here is a recipe that I have used:
                      5g / 1/8 oz dried wakame.
                      1/2 x 225-285g / 8-10 1/4 oz packet fresh soft tofu or long-life silken tofu.
                      400ml / 14 fl oz / 1 2/3 cups second dashi stock, or the same amount of water and 5 ml / 1 tsp dashi-no-moto.
                      45 ml / 3 tbsp miso.
                      2 spring onions (scallions), finely chopped shichimi togarashi, or sansho (optional), to serve.

                      1. Soak the wakame in a large bowl of cold water for 15 minutes.
                      2. Drain the wakame and chop into stamp-size pieces if using the long or broad type.
                      3. Cut the tofu into 1cm / 1/2 in strips, then cut horizontally through the strips. Cut the strips into squares.
                      4. Bring the dashi stock to the boil in a medium saucepan.
                      5. Put the miso in a cup and mix with 60ml / 4 tbsp hot stock. Reduce the heat and pour two-thirds of the miso into the pan of stock.
                      6. Taste the soup and add more miso if required. Add the wakame and tofu and increase the heat. Just befor the soup comes to the boil again, add the spring onions and remove from the heat. Do not boil. Serve sprinkled with shichimi togarashi or sansho, if liked.

                      Hope this helps.
                      Maredudd ap Gwylim

                      --- On Wed, 15/4/09, Leonora Radovcic <Lightpaws@...> wrote:

                      From: Leonora Radovcic <Lightpaws@...>
                      Subject: [SCA-JML] Miso Soup
                      To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Wednesday, 15 April, 2009, 7:49 PM

















                      Greetings. I've been a long time lurker on this list. Always reading, posting sometimes. I wish to ask for the receipe for Miso soup. I'd like to try and make one on my own. There was a receipe posted not too long ago. But, searching through the Archives would take forever, especially since I can't remember who had posted it. :)



                      Would someone be kind enough to post it again? Thanks. =)



                      YIS

                      Branimira































                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Franzi Dickson
                      ... Here s a picture of an old, though certainly not that old, grater: http://www.antiqueichiroya.com/item/list2/504880/
                      Message 10 of 15 , Apr 16, 2009
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                        -----Original Message-----
                        >From: Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...>
                        >Sent: Apr 16, 2009 1:51 AM
                        > However, I do believe that there
                        >is a device similar to a carpenter's plane which is period which can
                        >be pressed into service.

                        Here's a picture of an old, though certainly not that old, grater:

                        http://www.antiqueichiroya.com/item/list2/504880/
                      • Sonny Scott
                        I think that they might send to the US. I was able to odrer a free catalog to my US address. soni ________________________________ From: Bryant Richards
                        Message 11 of 15 , Apr 16, 2009
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                          I think that they might send to the US. I was able to odrer a free catalog to my US address.

                          soni




                          ________________________________
                          From: Bryant Richards <ninjalikereflex@...>
                          To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Thursday, April 16, 2009 2:06:46 AM
                          Subject: [SCA-JML] Carry stuff





                          I seem to remember not very long ago people where talking about what to use to carry stuff while dress in period. I am not sure if this came up, but I imagine you could use Seoi Kago. Not 100 sure if it's period, but I have seen similiar things in period artwork. I just never knew what to call it. I have had trouble finding it and I finally did, at a German Tool manufacture. Yeah go figure, it is like the german version of the black and decker company as far as I can tell, but amongst the power saws and hammers I find Seoi Kago! It's about $40 US but I can't seem to find anywhere on their site if they ship to the USA. But just looking at it it seems easy enough to make... assuming you know how to weave bamboo. Anyway here is the link:

                          http://www.dick biz/dick/ product/717880/ detail.jsf

                          In Honor and Service,
                          Uesugi no Ryujuichiro Uchiyasu

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • JESSICA DODGE
                          Bean paste and Benito flakes are the corner stone of a good Miso soup, in my opinion. There are about three different kinds of bean paste, light, medium and
                          Message 12 of 15 , Apr 16, 2009
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                            Bean paste and Benito flakes are the corner stone of a good Miso soup, in my opinion. There are about three different kinds of bean paste, light, medium and dark. Benito flakes are pretty much the same.
                            While dashi is good, I find that Dashi can be incredibly salty! Especially the Anchovy Dashi. If you are watching your salt intake, benito flakes and bean paste are a better alternative.
                             
                            Personally, I like body in my Miso soup. So as an american twist, I use a can of chicken broth and water as a base, then boil the flakes in it. The chicken broth doesn't cover up the taste of the flakes, I think it compliments it. After straining out the flakes, the soup base has a body to it that I really like.
                             
                            Add-ins like tofu and noodles, are to individual taste. Go to your local oriental market and experiment. That's what I do.
                             
                            There is no secret ingrediant or special recipe for miso soup. And in period, there was bean paste, benito flakes, and what ever you could afford, have in your pantry, or what was in the garden. (Same with stir fry. Rice, what veggies you had, and maybe if you were lucky, meat) So, using the three main ingrediants, water, bean paste, and benito flakes, as long as you keep it simple, your good.
                             
                            hope this has been helpful.
                            Hotaru/Takara/Helena 

                            --- On Thu, 4/16/09, Franzi Dickson <fdickson@...> wrote:

                            From: Franzi Dickson <fdickson@...>
                            Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Miso Soup
                            To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Thursday, April 16, 2009, 8:15 AM








                            -----Original Message-----
                            >From: Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@acm. org>
                            >Sent: Apr 16, 2009 1:51 AM
                            > However, I do believe that there
                            >is a device similar to a carpenter's plane which is period which can
                            >be pressed into service.

                            Here's a picture of an old, though certainly not that old, grater:

                            http://www.antiquei chiroya.com/ item/list2/ 504880/


















                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Franzi Dickson
                            ... I thought the kind of dashi made from bonito flakes WAS the most common (though the sardine/anchovy stuff is common too, of course). --Franzi
                            Message 13 of 15 , Apr 16, 2009
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                              -----Original Message-----
                              >From: JESSICA DODGE <kaythiarain@...>
                              >Sent: Apr 16, 2009 1:03 PM
                              >While dashi is good, I find that Dashi can be incredibly salty! Especially the Anchovy Dashi. If you are watching your salt intake, benito flakes and bean paste are a better alternative.

                              I thought the kind of dashi made from bonito flakes WAS the most common (though the sardine/anchovy stuff is common too, of course).

                              --Franzi
                            • Leonora Radovcic
                              Greetings Cousins, To all who have posted miso soup reciepes and suggestions, thank you. They were very helpful. I am looking to make a bit of both: the
                              Message 14 of 15 , Apr 17, 2009
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                                Greetings Cousins,

                                To all who have posted miso soup reciepes and suggestions, thank you. They were very helpful. I am looking to make a bit of both: the modern ones, as well as the most traditional ones. I am grateful.

                                YIS
                                Branimira
                              • JL Badgley
                                ... I don t think the recipe for the basic broth is that different. The type of miso might be--I don t know that modern miso is the same as older miso
                                Message 15 of 15 , Apr 17, 2009
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                                  On Sat, Apr 18, 2009 at 9:48 AM, Leonora Radovcic <Lightpaws@...> wrote:
                                  > Greetings Cousins,
                                  >
                                  > To all who have posted miso soup reciepes and suggestions, thank you.  They were very helpful.  I am looking to make a bit of both:  the modern ones, as well as the most traditional ones.  I am grateful.
                                  >
                                  I don't think the recipe for the basic broth is that different. The
                                  type of miso might be--I don't know that modern miso is the same as
                                  older miso (especially in terms of the grains used), but it may be.
                                  Hard to say, but by the 17th century we have differentiations of
                                  "nakamiso" ("middle" miso--something between dark and light miso,
                                  which seems the standard miso for most recipes), "usumiso" (thin
                                  miso--this might be talking about the broth, as I'm doing this out of
                                  memory), and even "chunky" miso (indicating that most are not that
                                  chunky).


                                  -Ii
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