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RE: [SCA-JML] Heian Dyeing

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  • Deb Strub
    Kimono: Fashioning Culture by Liza Crihfield Dalby
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 1, 2008
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      Kimono: Fashioning Culture by Liza Crihfield Dalby
      <http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/ref=ntt_athr_dp_sr_1?%5
      Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books&field-author=Liza%20Crihfield%20Da
      lby> ISBN-10: 0295981555 has a couple of good chapters on Heian period
      layering.
      KOSODE 16th - 19th Century Textiles from the Nomura Collection by Amanda
      Mayer Stinchecum ISBN 0-87011-429-8 has a number of sections that will
      helpful to you. Check out the whole section "Color: Dyes and Pigments" by
      Monica Bethe for details on color significance, dyestuff, techniques, etc.
      Appendix 5 Dyes and Colors is a table with illustrations of the plants,
      extraction methods with mordants, colors yielded, etc.
      Textiles of Old Japan: Color and Dye by Mary Dusenbury with Takimo Kazuko is
      a pamphlet accompanying an exhibition at the San Francisco Craft & Folk Art
      Museum, April 16 - June 8, 1986. It discusses the development and use of
      different dyes throughout the various historical periods in Japan.
      You should be able to get the first tow references from Interlibrary Loan.
      The third may be hard to find. You can write the museum and see if they
      still have copies available.
      Good luck with your project.
      YIS,
      Murakami Tsuruko
      An Tir


      From: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sca-jml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      tatsumechan
      Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 8:28 AM
      To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [SCA-JML] Heian Dyeing

      (yes dyeing is a real word according to dictionary.com)

      Can anyone point me towards some books about Heian period dyeing. I
      want to write a paper for school about the color layering of the
      women's clothes and thought it'd be nice to include some information
      about the dyeing process.

      arigatou gozaimasu
      Tatsume


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • tatsumechan
      Thenk you everybody. Turns out my school library has Kimono: Fashioning Culture by Dalby and Kosode by Stinchecum so I ll be getting those two tomorrow baring
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 1, 2008
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        Thenk you everybody. Turns out my school library has Kimono:
        Fashioning Culture by Dalby and Kosode by Stinchecum so I'll be
        getting those two tomorrow baring that anything unusual and down right
        weird happens.

        domo arigatou gozaimasu
        Tatsume
      • tatsumechan
        Sorry for the intrusion again but reading Kosode has left me feeling a bit confused. I was under the impression that the Heian women wore a white kosode
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 5, 2008
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          Sorry for the intrusion again but reading Kosode has left me feeling a
          bit confused. I was under the impression that the Heian women wore a
          white kosode underneath all their layers though the book is saying
          that the hitoe was next to the skin and does not mention the kosode.
          Did the kosode come later and I was just misinformed?

          Tatsume
        • tatsumechan
          ... Ack! It was in the kimono that I was reading. Kosode is the other book I got from the library. I need more sleep apparently. Tatsume
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 5, 2008
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            --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "tatsumechan" <kanamori.tatsume@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Sorry for the intrusion again but reading Kosode has left me feeling a
            > bit confused. I was under the impression that the Heian women wore a
            > white kosode underneath all their layers though the book is saying
            > that the hitoe was next to the skin and does not mention the kosode.
            > Did the kosode come later and I was just misinformed?
            >
            > Tatsume
            >

            Ack! It was in the kimono that I was reading. Kosode is the other book
            I got from the library. I need more sleep apparently.

            Tatsume
          • wodeford
            ... Hitoe means an unlined garment. The index in Dalby s Kimono: Fashioning Culture actually has two listings of this term, one for any unlined kimono, one
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 5, 2008
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              --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "tatsumechan" <kanamori.tatsume@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Sorry for the intrusion again but reading Kosode has left me feeling a
              > bit confused. I was under the impression that the Heian women wore a
              > white kosode underneath all their layers though the book is saying
              > that the hitoe was next to the skin and does not mention the kosode.
              > Did the kosode come later and I was just misinformed?

              "Hitoe" means an unlined garment. The index in Dalby's "Kimono:
              Fashioning Culture" actually has two listings of this term, one for
              any unlined kimono, one for the "chemise" layer worn in the Heian
              period. (There's even male hitoe from the Heian period, but it is not
              discussed in Dalby.) Pages 228 - 229 of my edition of Dalby (it's in
              Chapter 7) discuss the layers worn: kosode, with
              hakama/haribakama/nagabakama worn over it. Over that, the hitoe and
              then multiple uchigi over the hitoe.

              "Hitoe, chemise. First of the layered set of gowns, cut slightly
              larger than the ones that came on top. The hitoe protruded prominently
              at the sleeve openings and hem. The color of the chemise was crucial
              to the ensemble's effect...."

              This video shows a woman being dressed in a Heian ensemble.
              http://www.tokyodv.com/culture/HinaKimono.html
              Note that she starts out in a white kosode and scarlet nagabakama. The
              first layer the dressers put on over that (light green) is her hitoe.
              When they've got everything else on, you can still see the green hitoe
              layer peeping out from under all the sleeves layered on top because
              it's cut slightly wider than they are.

              Hope this helps.

              Saionji no Hanae
              West Kingdom
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