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Introduction and question...

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  • tigurgurl03
    Hello m lords and ladies, My name is Catherine Vallemont. I currently reside in the Kingdom of Gleann Abhann and having been playing in the society for 5 years
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 19, 2008
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      Hello m'lords and ladies,

      My name is Catherine Vallemont. I currently reside in the Kingdom of
      Gleann Abhann and having been playing in the society for 5 years now. I
      now have a firend who is nterested in becoming a member and having a
      Japanese persona. Since I will be making his garb, I am assisting in
      the research for patterns and garb for him. So far we have decide that
      he should have a basic set of hakama, kosode, and the kimono that goes
      under the two. Since he is interested in fighting, he would like a
      kosode that the arms can be tied back/up on. My question is this: is
      this done with a seperate cord or are there straps sewn to the inside
      of the sleeves? Any assistance in this is most apreciated. Thank you
      all in advance.

      Catherine Vallemont
    • JL Badgley
      On Sun, Oct 19, 2008 at 3:11 PM, tigurgurl03 ... Greetings, Vallemont-dono, Welcome, and I m glad to hear you are helping your friend. Feel free to refer him
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 19, 2008
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        On Sun, Oct 19, 2008 at 3:11 PM, tigurgurl03
        <catherinevalmont85@...> wrote:
        > Hello m'lords and ladies,
        >
        > My name is Catherine Vallemont. I currently reside in the Kingdom of
        > Gleann Abhann and having been playing in the society for 5 years now. I
        > now have a firend who is nterested in becoming a member and having a
        > Japanese persona. Since I will be making his garb, I am assisting in
        > the research for patterns and garb for him.

        Greetings, Vallemont-dono,

        Welcome, and I'm glad to hear you are helping your friend. Feel free
        to refer him here or to Tousando (http://tousando.proboards18.com/).

        Before I begin, some other sites that are helpful:

        http://sengokudaimyo.com
        - Check out the clothing sections.

        http://www.wodefordhall.com/
        - Saionji-hime's site has some very good info for garb.

        http://www.iz2.or.jp/
        - The Kyoto Costume Museum--there is a link to the English web site,
        and a gallery of historical outfits.

        > So far we have decide that
        > he should have a basic set of hakama, kosode, and the kimono that goes
        > under the two.

        Before we go too far, what time period? I'm assuming late 16th
        century, based on other things you've said, but it would help to
        clarify, as Japanese clothing varies over the centuries, much as
        English or French clothing would! :)

        A good, all-purpose outfit is hakama, kosode, and hitatare (or a
        kataginu, which is a hitatare without the sleeves). However, the
        kosode is the *undermost* garment, with the small sleeves that look
        more like modern kimono sleeves, with only a small opening for the
        hand and wrist. Hitatare sleeves, on the other hand, are simply large
        tubes. The length should be enough to fully cover the hand, and they
        can be wide enough so that the innermost point of the 'tube' reaches
        below the wearer's waist.

        Here are some photos:
        http://www.iz2.or.jp/fukushoku/f_disp.php?page_no=0000092
        http://www.iz2.or.jp/fukushoku/f_disp.php?page_no=0000078
        http://www.iz2.or.jp/fukushoku/f_disp.php?page_no=0000079
        http://www.iz2.or.jp/fukushoku/f_disp.php?page_no=0000090

        A kataginu (it also shows the kosode well):
        http://www.iz2.or.jp/fukushoku/f_disp.php?page_no=0000100

        And for some examples of hitatare in the SCA, check out this page:

        http://www.wodefordhall.com/samurai.htm

        I highly recommend looking at Takeda-dono, and the outfit that
        Abe-hime has on is actually in Japan. Unfortunately, we don't have
        that one on us at the moment.

        > Since he is interested in fighting, he would like a
        > kosode that the arms can be tied back/up on. My question is this: is
        > this done with a seperate cord or are there straps sewn to the inside
        > of the sleeves? Any assistance in this is most apreciated. Thank you
        > all in advance.

        Well, although there is a cord that can be used for it, look here for
        how that was usually solved in period:
        http://www.iz2.or.jp/fukushoku/f_disp.php?page_no=0000086

        Note how the kote are actually covering the yoroi-hitatare (armour
        hitatare). The kosode sleeves don't need to be tied back. BTW, I
        highly recommend making a hitatare for fighting that is separate from
        the one for regular wear. You can take it off and switch it out after
        the fighting and it will likely feel much better to have 'changed'.
        If you can make a second kosode, that's not a bad idea, either.

        FYI, the cords on the sleeves of the hitatare I've seen done in two
        ways. The simplest seems to be just to slit the fabric carefully at
        regular intervals around the sleeve mouth. You have to plan them to
        get it to look right. Then thread the cord. I've done this with a
        few garments and thrown it in the wash and was surprised at how
        durable it was (I expected a lot of fraying, but the cord or something
        appeared to keep it all in place).

        I've generally used flat braid for that (and not as often as I
        should). The ties and the small knots at key points on the garment
        are very important for getting a good look with solid fabric, imho.
        Ditto with the cords to 'tie it closed' that are usually left tied
        very loosely.

        Oh, and *don't* sew the sides of the hitatare. It is like a
        rectangular poncho with sleeves. One of my early problems when trying
        to create one.

        -Ii
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