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Re: Kosode options for the single young woman of the Sengoku Jidai

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  • wodeford
    ... The whole sleeve/obi/neckline = marital/social status is an Edo period development. There is some evidence of furisode existing prior to 1600, but they
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 6, 2008
      --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "backhanded.compliment"
      <backhanded.compliment@...> wrote:
      > Was the kosode in the sengoku jidai comparable to the furisode for an
      > unmarried young woman of 20, notably the daughter of a Samurai and a
      > merchant? Or was there a different set of clothes for her to wear?

      The whole sleeve/obi/neckline = marital/social status is an Edo period
      development. There is some evidence of furisode existing prior to
      1600, but they were worn only by small children.

      There are some examples of what a woman of the samurai caste would
      wear at the Kyoto Costume Museum here:
      http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/fukusyoku/busou/29.htm
      While they technically have their own names depending on whether it is
      an undergarment layer or the outermost worn open like a coat, she's
      basically wearing several layers of kosode-form garments.

      Basically, a woman of higher social status would have kosode of better
      and more decorated materials than one of lower social status.

      > What weapons would she be allowed to carry on her person?
      I'll defer this answer to the bushi on the list. Weapons are what one
      has guards for. ;-D

      Likewise, I shall defer to the name mavens on that question.

      Saionji no Hanae
      West Kingdom
    • Scott
      I do not know that much about the clothing question. However, as far as weapons go I am not aware of any official regulations in any province or from the
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 7, 2008
        I do not know that much about the clothing question. However, as far as
        weapons go I am not aware of any official regulations in any province
        or from the bakufu limiting the types of weapons women were ALLOWED to
        carry as opposed to men of the same status, at least not before the
        Tokugawa period. But, I believe that even in the Sengoku Jidai it would
        have been socially awkward for a women to walk around town carrying a
        weapon other than some form of dagger. At least, openly. As far as
        disguised or hidden weapons, who knows for sure. Now in times to war
        this could be different. It is more of an Edo period idea that the
        naginata was a woman's weapon, however I believe that the root is found
        in the 16th century as the practice of women using naginata as a home
        defensive weapon become more common. There were men who carried
        naginata onto the battlefield, although fewer since the increased
        popularity of the spear, and there were also some samurai women that
        were trained in the use of more weapons than just the naginata and
        dagger. But, even in the 15th or 16th century I think unlike men, it
        would have been weird to see a womam, even if buke status, carrying
        swords or spears, or even naginata around with them on a daily basis.
      • Elaine Koogler
        Now there may be more recently located information, but I did find information at one point...I can t remember where...that Samurai women frequently carried an
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 7, 2008
          Now there may be more recently located information, but I did find
          information at one point...I can't remember where...that Samurai women
          frequently carried an /aikuchi/ in the fold of their kosode much as they
          also carried a kind of billfold and a fan. I've never seen anything to
          dispute this, so it is something I usually do, especially with formal garb.

          Kiri
          Atlantia

          Scott wrote:
          >
          > I do not know that much about the clothing question. However, as far as
          > weapons go I am not aware of any official regulations in any province
          > or from the bakufu limiting the types of weapons women were ALLOWED to
          > carry as opposed to men of the same status, at least not before the
          > Tokugawa period. But, I believe that even in the Sengoku Jidai it would
          > have been socially awkward for a women to walk around town carrying a
          > weapon other than some form of dagger. At least, openly. As far as
          > disguised or hidden weapons, who knows for sure. Now in times to war
          > this could be different. It is more of an Edo period idea that the
          > naginata was a woman's weapon, however I believe that the root is found
          > in the 16th century as the practice of women using naginata as a home
          > defensive weapon become more common. There were men who carried
          > naginata onto the battlefield, although fewer since the increased
          > popularity of the spear, and there were also some samurai women that
          > were trained in the use of more weapons than just the naginata and
          > dagger. But, even in the 15th or 16th century I think unlike men, it
          > would have been weird to see a womam, even if buke status, carrying
          > swords or spears, or even naginata around with them on a daily basis.
          >
          >
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