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Re: [SCA-JML] CAID Collegium Class

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  • Bryant Richards
    It s always fun to learn about the little things that could be missed (like what direction to point the tea pot in) I too am teaching a class at RUM this year
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 10, 2008
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      It's always fun to learn about the little things that could be missed (like what direction to point the tea pot in)

      I too am teaching a class at RUM this year and Japanese Naming Practices as it applies to the SCA and also on titles, etc.

      In Honor and Service,

      Uesugi no Ryujuichiro Uchiyasu

      --- On Tue, 6/10/08, celticmiste48 <britt.booth@...> wrote:
      From: celticmiste48 <britt.booth@...>
      Subject: [SCA-JML] CAID Collegium Class
      To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, June 10, 2008, 1:06 PM











      Greetings,



      At the last Collegium, I got it in my head that it might be nice to

      offer a class on the Japanese Tea ceremony for this upcoming Fall

      Collegium, along with the option of sampling the tea and a sweet of

      some sort during the class. Of course, a class block is two hours, and

      my knowledge of Tea and pre-modern culture in Japan is by no means

      exhaustive. I was wondering if I could get some feedback, on what

      folks might like to see included in the class, so I can better prepare

      a lecture outline.



      Right now, I'm looking at a broad overview of Chado from its origins

      up to about the end of the SCA period or shortly after. I'm planning

      on including a summary of Buddhism and how it relates to Tea, and a

      similarly brief overview of the arts (pottery, calligraphy, etc)

      involved in the ceremony.



      I was wondering if there were other things people might like to see

      presented in the class.



      Thank you for your time!

      --Bronwyn of Gyldenholt





























      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Solveig Throndardottir
      Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... Ahhh. I m not sure what exactly you are proposing to do. The sencha ceremony is pretty much post-period in Japan. The
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 11, 2008
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        Noble Cousin!

        Greetings from Solveig!
        > At the last Collegium, I got it in my head that it might be nice to
        > offer a class on the Japanese Tea ceremony for this upcoming Fall
        > Collegium, along with the option of sampling the tea and a sweet of
        > some sort during the class.
        Ahhh. I'm not sure what exactly you are proposing to do. The sencha
        ceremony is pretty much post-period in Japan. The Matcha ceremony
        is solidly period. The problem with matcha is that it requires
        significant
        set up and tear down time and non-trivial actual execution time.

        Sweets themselves are somewhat problematic. Assuming that you are
        preparing usucha, then tradition says that you should serve higashi.
        Higashi is not that difficult to make, but it is difficult to find
        premade in
        North America. Omogashi is a bit easier as I'm pretty sure that
        mizuyokan
        is period.

        > Right now, I'm looking at a broad overview of Chado from its origins
        > up to about the end of the SCA period or shortly after. I'm planning
        > on including a summary of Buddhism and how it relates to Tea, and a
        > similarly brief overview of the arts (pottery, calligraphy, etc)
        > involved in the ceremony.

        Thinking big aren't you. Actually, one hour of instruction followed by a
        demo should work fairly well. The thing that you need to account for is
        setup and tear down time which have to occur before and after your
        time slot. Basically all of the mizuya work and that sort of stuff.

        So, where is this event supposed to take place?

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Solveig Throndardottir
        Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! I forgot to ask which temae you were planning on performing. Your Humble Servant Solveig Throndardottir Amateur Scholar
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 11, 2008
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          Noble Cousin!

          Greetings from Solveig! I forgot to ask which temae you were planning
          on performing.

          Your Humble Servant
          Solveig Throndardottir
          Amateur Scholar






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • celticmiste48
          ... I had planned a basic (matcha) usucha hira-demae or rakubon; I have enough of the necessary equipment to manage either one - I do plan on trying to get a
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 12, 2008
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            --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...>
            wrote:

            > Ahhh. I'm not sure what exactly you are proposing to do. [...]

            I had planned a basic (matcha) usucha hira-demae or rakubon; I have
            enough of the necessary equipment to manage either one - I do plan on
            trying to get a few straw beach mats so I can do it on the floor of
            the classroom (actual tatami being both prohibitively expensive and
            unable to fit in my dinky car). I will have to 'cheat' and use a hot
            plate for the kettle, as I have not yet advanced enough to learn about
            the charcoal procedures (and I'm not sure live fire would be the best
            idea for this). My main goal is to approximate the overall 'feel' of
            the ceremony, and provide a visual presentation of the steps that are
            involved in the basic ceremony.

            > Sweets themselves are somewhat problematic. Assuming that you are
            > preparing usucha, then tradition says that you should serve higashi.
            > Higashi is not that difficult to make, but it is difficult to find
            > premade in North America. Omogashi is a bit easier as I'm pretty
            sure that mizuyokan is period.

            My current plan is to order the higashi from a site like
            Tea-circle.com in advance, but also bring something like mochigashi to
            offer a bit of variety to those present. If I'm feeling especially
            ambitious, I may try my hand at candied citrus peel, though I'm not
            sure of how 'period' it is. Most of the books on candy that I've seen
            in bookstores are in Japanese, and my language skills are intermediate
            at best.

            > Thinking big aren't you. Actually, one hour of instruction followed
            by a demo should work fairly well. The thing that you need to account
            for is setup and tear down time which have to occur before and after
            your time slot. Basically all of the mizuya work and that sort of stuff.

            Thank you for reminding me of the mizuya portion. I (foolishly) forgot
            about that and was focusing on the contents of the lecture. Oops!

            > So, where is this event supposed to take place?

            According to the site
            (http://www.collegiumcaidis.org/08fall/index.html):
            Calle Mayor Middle School
            4800 Calle Mayor
            Torrance, CA, 90505

            I've never taught a class of any sort before, so please feel free to
            point out anything I'm forgetting.

            Thank you!
            --Bronwyn
          • Solveig Throndardottir
            Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... Rakubon is of course the easiest. And, you bring in the water pre- heated. ... Roll up mats or even simply rugs will
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 12, 2008
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              Noble Cousin!

              Greetings from Solveig!

              > I had planned a basic (matcha) usucha hira-demae or rakubon;

              Rakubon is of course the easiest. And, you bring in the water pre-
              heated.

              > I have
              > enough of the necessary equipment to manage either one - I do plan on
              > trying to get a few straw beach mats so I can do it on the floor of
              > the classroom (actual tatami being both prohibitively expensive and
              > unable to fit in my dinky car).

              Roll up mats or even simply rugs will work.

              > I will have to 'cheat' and use a hot
              > plate for the kettle,

              Ahh. You don't have a furo. That does present problems of a hira temae.
              Incidentally I have done quite a few demos using a hibachi made out of
              plaster of paris or something like that which belongs to someone else.
              I have also conducted tea ceremonies in camp grounds using a dug for
              the occasion fir pit for a ro even though it was Summer. I do have two
              furo, but I have yet to taken either camping. I have brought the smaller
              one to do indoor tea demos at events.

              > as I have not yet advanced enough to learn about
              > the charcoal procedures (and I'm not sure live fire would be the best
              > idea for this).

              Don't worry about the charcoal ceremony. In most temae, you do not
              arrange the charcoal anyway. They do manufacture electric heaters
              specifically for the tea ceremony. If you have enough time and
              financial resources, you should be able to buy one from Tea Circle
              if you don't already have one.

              > My current plan is to order the higashi from a site like
              > Tea-circle.com in advance, but also bring something like mochigashi to
              > offer a bit of variety to those present.

              If you are into cooking, then you can even acquire a copy of the
              following
              book provided you can deal with the Japanese.

              ISBN: 4473018954

              > Most of the books on candy that I've seen
              > in bookstores are in Japanese, and my language skills are intermediate
              > at best.

              That's what the pictures are for. Incidentally, okashi is supposed to
              have
              originally referred to fruit and nuts. However, the tea ceremony is
              rather
              strongly associated with tōgashi.

              Out of curiosity, who are you studying tea with?

              Your Humble Servant
              Solveig Throndardottir
              Amateur Scholar






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • celticmiste48
              ... [...] ... temae. Incidentally I have done quite a few demos using a hibachi made out of plaster of paris or something like that which belongs to someone
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 16, 2008
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                --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...>
                wrote:
                > > I had planned a basic (matcha) usucha hira-demae or rakubon;
                > Rakubon is of course the easiest. And, you bring in the water pre-
                > heated.
                [...]
                > Ahh. You don't have a furo. That does present problems of a hira
                temae. Incidentally I have done quite a few demos using a hibachi made
                out of plaster of paris or something like that which belongs to
                someone else. I have also conducted tea ceremonies in camp grounds
                using a dug for the occasion fir pit for a ro even though it was
                Summer. I do have two furo, but I have yet to taken either camping. I
                have brought the smaller one to do indoor tea demos at events.
                [...]
                I do have the kama/furo set, but the heating element that is electric
                is the expensive one from Tea Circle, hence the need for a hot plate.
                But as you say below, if the charcoal setup doesn't matter, then I can
                use the whole furo setup without much difficulty. For the plaster of
                paris that you're talking about - do you have pictures of one? The
                only thing I'm visualizing are the small, table-top-sized ones that
                one might grill fish or toast mochi on.

                Also, might you have any tips or tricks for the charcoal? (Ways to
                arrange it, light it, etc.)

                > Don't worry about the charcoal ceremony. In most temae, you do not
                > arrange the charcoal anyway. They do manufacture electric heaters
                > specifically for the tea ceremony. If you have enough time and
                > financial resources, you should be able to buy one from Tea Circle
                > if you don't already have one.
                >
                > > My current plan is to order the higashi from a site like
                Tea-circle.com in advance, but also bring something like mochigashi to
                offer a bit of variety to those present.

                > If you are into cooking, then you can even acquire a copy of the
                > following book provided you can deal with the Japanese.
                >
                > ISBN: 4473018954
                [...] Incidentally, okashi is supposed to have originally referred to
                fruit and nuts. However, the tea ceremony is rather strongly
                associated with tōgashi.

                My cooking skills are pretty poor, but if the pictures are thorough, I
                could probably stumble my way through it. I'll keep an eye out for
                that book closer to the date of Collegium. Thank you!

                > Out of curiosity, who are you studying tea with?
                I'm currently taking lessons from Tam Nomoto, who studies under Soyu
                Koizumi of the Orange County Chapter.
              • Solveig Throndardottir
                Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... Do you have any of the books that show how the charcoal is theoretically arranged? You can simply try to approximate
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 16, 2008
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                  Noble Cousin!

                  Greetings from Solveig!
                  > Also, might you have any tips or tricks for the charcoal? (Ways to
                  > arrange it, light it, etc.)
                  Do you have any of the books that show how the charcoal is
                  theoretically arranged? You can simply try to approximate one
                  of the standard arrangements. As for getting the stuff going, my
                  sensei used to stick charcoal in a perforated sauce pan and cook
                  it over a bas burner. This charcoal would be arranged in sort of a
                  tee-pee arrangement in the furo or ro, and then fresh charcoal would
                  be arranged on top of it in one of the prescribed patterns.

                  Your Humble Servant
                  Solveig Throndardottir
                  Amateur Scholar






                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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