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Re: [SCA-JML] Cut of Heian ginu

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  • Ellen Badgley
    I just pulled out Jidai Ishou no Nuikata. Some thoughts: - The itsutsuginu in Jidai Ishou no Nuikata is a period cheater garment, made with one body and
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 5 6:36 PM
      I just pulled out Jidai Ishou no Nuikata. Some thoughts:

      - The itsutsuginu in Jidai Ishou no Nuikata is a period "cheater"
      garment, made with one body and five sets of sleeves/collars/hems.
      For that, it would make sense that any offset, if it exists, would be
      sewn into the garment...but from the illustration of the reconstructed
      garment, it does not appear that there is any offset, or if there is,
      it is very small. (That particular itsutsuginu, though, is five
      layers of the same color, so there's less to contrast).

      - Ii is right about there being a size difference between the inner
      and the other layers of the *whole ensemble*: the bodies are all the
      same size, but the sleeve widths-- and lengths-- vary. The sleeves of
      the outer layers (uwagi and uchiginu) are about a centimeter or so
      smaller in width than the itsutsuginu, but about 5 centimeters smaller
      in length (I believe to help the inner layers "pooch" out and show
      more clearly). The inner layer, the hitoe, is a good 5 centimeters
      wider in the sleeves (and longer in the body as well), so it clearly
      shows all around (the sleeve length here is the same as the
      itsutsuginu).

      I'd say any size difference depends on the type of garment. The hitoe
      (underneath) is the biggest; the kinu used for layering (to form the
      "heart" of the kasane) are all the same size, and any offset is
      produced from the way they are worn; and the (uchiginu and) uwagi are
      a little bit smaller. This makes sense: the outer and inner layers
      will stay where they are, but the layering kinu can be reorganized
      depending on the season.

      - Abe Akirakeiko


      On Thu, Jun 5, 2008 at 11:18 PM, JL Badgley <tatsushu@...> wrote:
      > To be a possible dissenting voice--I believe there is some evidence
      > for this in Jidai Ishou no Nuikata--but I am in Japan and not with my
      > sources. When I get home I will check.
      >
      > That said, the difference, if there is any, is not great as I recall,
      > and seems to be mostly in the sleeves--if I'm remembering things
      > correctly. And if anything, I believe it is the circumference of the
      > sode (with the outer garments being maybe a centimeter or so smaller),
      > but I need to check my sources.
      >
      > -Ii
    • wodeford
      Dalby, Kimono: Fashioning Culture, Chapter 7, p. 235 of my edition, facing the color plate of Ms. Dalby in karaginu mo: I had mistakenly thought that the
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 5 7:25 PM
        Dalby, Kimono: Fashioning Culture, Chapter 7, p. 235 of my edition,
        facing the color plate of Ms. Dalby in karaginu mo:

        "I had mistakenly thought that the robes in a set must have each been
        cut smaller in order to reveal the edge of the one beneath, but I
        discovered that the effect was created as each layer created more
        bulk, and it was the skill of the dresser that made the edges lie so
        neatly apart....."

        p. 229, see description of hitoe "cut slightly larger than the ones
        that came on top. The hitoe protruded prominently at the sleeve
        openings and hem." The uchigi description repeats the fact that it's
        the bulk of the layers that reveals the edges of the inner ones.

        p. 230, see description of Karaginu with "relatively narrow sleeves."

        See also Abe-hime's response regarding relative dimensions on the
        various garments.

        Saionji no Hanae
        West Kingdom
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