Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

A forwarded question

Expand Messages
  • John Lyon
    I received this question from a group forming in the north of our kingdom. I don t have the expertise to answer the questions but I know that the wisdom of
    Message 1 of 5 , May 27, 2008
      I received this question from a group forming in the north of our
      kingdom. I don't have the expertise to answer the questions but I know
      that the wisdom of this list should be able to answer the question.

      We have a member up here that loves to do Origami, and he had a couple
      questions. One, he says that there are two different styles of paper
      crane, and he is wondering which one is in period. His second
      question has to do with the legend of 1000 cranes and how far back it
      goes in history. I have managed to find that the art itself is
      definitely in period, however I haven't found any documentation about
      style. As for the 1000 cranes thing... well, the best I have found is
      "legend says"...which is really no help at all.

      --
      "You know, I used to think it was awful that life was so unfair. Then I
      thought, wouldn't it be much worse if life were fair, and all the terrible
      things that happen to us come because we actually deserve them? So, now I
      take great comfort in the general hostility and unfairness of the universe."
      -Marcus to Franklin in Babylon 5

      John Lyon
      aka The Ugly Dragon
      aka Kita Jiru Toramassa
    • JL Badgley
      ... The crane is actually fairly important to origami, as I recall, because many later shapes evolved from it. Unfortunately, though I don t have the
      Message 2 of 5 , May 27, 2008
        On Tue, May 27, 2008 at 9:19 PM, John Lyon <toramassa@...> wrote:

        > We have a member up here that loves to do Origami, and he had a couple
        > questions. One, he says that there are two different styles of paper
        > crane, and he is wondering which one is in period. His second
        > question has to do with the legend of 1000 cranes and how far back it
        > goes in history. I have managed to find that the art itself is
        > definitely in period, however I haven't found any documentation about
        > style. As for the 1000 cranes thing... well, the best I have found is
        > "legend says"...which is really no help at all.

        The crane is actually fairly important to origami, as I recall,
        because many later shapes evolved from it. Unfortunately, though I
        don't have the provenance on me, everything I've ever seen points to
        it (and the story of 1,000 cranes) as being post-period. Period
        origami appears to be much more abstract, and I'm not sure if any of
        the animal shapes really show up until after the Edo period.
        Unfortunately, due to the medium, it seems that the actual historical
        information on it is scarce and hard to come by, as has been noted.

        This has not kept me from making small origami tokens for people as a
        way to show appreciation of A&S entries, etc.


        -Ii
      • Jennifer Kobayashi
        ... As others have said, documentation is sketchy and research is difficult. The only figures that it seems fairly certain are period are Yakko-san (the clown
        Message 3 of 5 , May 27, 2008
          --- John Lyon <toramassa@...> wrote:


          > We have a member up here that loves to do Origami,
          > and he had a couple
          > questions.

          As others have said, documentation is sketchy and
          research is difficult.

          The only figures that it seems fairly certain are
          period are Yakko-san (the clown figure), and the
          waterbomb base, possibly the salt cellar.
          See:
          http://origami.kvi.nl/lists/history.htm
          and
          Complete Origami by Eric Kenneway ISBN 0-312-00898-8

          Sembazuru Orikata _How to Fold a Thousand Cranes_ was
          published in 1797 and is where most crane figures make
          their first appearance.

          It is possible that the simpler bird form, often
          called the flapping bird, might be period, but again -
          no documentation.

          Noshi-zutsumi or noshi-tsutsumi are period and
          although some might not consider it origami, it is
          paper folding.

          Perhaps others have more information.

          Ki Izmui

          -Jennifer
        • Anthony Bryant
          On the origami crane: I m pretty sure that I remember seeing *somewhere* a kabuto where the helmet crest was a carved wooden origami crane (how s that for
          Message 4 of 5 , May 27, 2008
            On the origami crane:

            I'm pretty sure that I remember seeing *somewhere* a kabuto where the
            helmet crest was a carved wooden origami crane (how's that for
            cognitive dissonance?), lacquered and gilt.

            I can't recall the period of the helmet -- it *may* have been Edo.

            So while I can't swear that it's period, at least it was sufficiently
            in the public consciousness to have become a helmet crest.


            Effingham
          • Jennifer Kobayashi
            Here is a later and augmented version of the history of origami notes online: http://homepage.ntlworld.com/peterjohn.rootham-smith/new%20history%20notes.htm It
            Message 5 of 5 , May 27, 2008
              Here is a later and augmented version of the history
              of origami notes online:

              http://homepage.ntlworld.com/peterjohn.rootham-smith/new%20history%20notes.htm

              It cites a book published in 1700 where there is
              an illustration of a Kimono that has a design using
              the classic paper crane. This indicates that the crane
              was well established by 1700 - but alas, not any proof
              for 1600.


              Ki Izumi

              -Jennifer
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.