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kabuto

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  • J. Norton
    Has anyone done a kabuto using an older (WWII) steel military helmet as a shortcut for the body/bowl. It seems like this would save a significant amount of
    Message 1 of 10 , May 14, 2008
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      Has anyone done a kabuto using an older (WWII) steel military helmet as a shortcut for the body/bowl. It seems like this would save a significant amount of time even taking into consideration modifiying it cosmetically to appear to have been made of multi-plates et riveted.

      Is there a reason why I would not want to do this? (from a practical standpoint... I know there are myriad aesthetic reasons...)

      If someone has is there anything I need to be cautious of?

      Thanks

      Jeremy



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David
      My first kabuto was made that way with 16 Ga. sides, mempo and topped off with 1/4 round bar. I fought in it for several years and served me well. The
      Message 2 of 10 , May 14, 2008
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        My first kabuto was made that way with 16 Ga. sides, "mempo" and
        topped off with 1/4" round bar. I fought in it for several years and
        served me well. The WWII army pots have a special alloy. It welds
        normally but will dent easily. Since it is a work hardening steel do
        NOT attempt to remove any of those dents as it can cause it to crack.
        It does look decent but the spun domes are far better in the long
        run. If you intend to use an army pot be sure it is a WWII helmet and
        not a later one because the later ones are softer and will not stand
        up to the kind of punishment we will subject it to.

        Happy gunching!
        Ishikawa Moritake, the original "Jap Vader"

        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "J. Norton" <princebeowulf@...> wrote:
        >
        > Has anyone done a kabuto using an older (WWII) steel military helmet
        as a shortcut for the body/bowl. It seems like this would save a
        significant amount of time even taking into consideration modifiying
        it cosmetically to appear to have been made of multi-plates et riveted.
        >
        > Is there a reason why I would not want to do this? (from a
        practical standpoint... I know there are myriad aesthetic reasons...)
        >
        > If someone has is there anything I need to be cautious of?
        >
        > Thanks
        >
        > Jeremy
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • rhoward
        Kombanwa, I, too, started my career with a converted WWII US Army helmet. While the look was good for its time, it sufferred some of the difficulties that the
        Message 3 of 10 , May 14, 2008
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          Kombanwa,

          I, too, started my career with a converted WWII US Army helmet. While the look was good for its
          time, it sufferred some of the difficulties that the honorable Ishikawa Moritake described.

          Calontir outlawed the use of Army helmets for helm construction for this, and other reasons (i.e.
          insufficient mass), and the crusty old thing (which was grandfathered) was auctioned off when it
          failed to make inspections.

          Be sure to check your kingdom's marshallate documents and The Society's
          (http://www.sca.org/officers/marshal/combat/armored/marshal_handbook.pdf) to see what your
          parameters are, if you have not done so already.

          Best of luck,
          Yoshi


          Akitsuki Yoshimitsu - Barony of Coeur d'Ennui, Kingdom of Calontir
          Wealth and rank are like the clouds; I do not wish for such transient things.


          ------- Original Message -------
          From : David[mailto:txpiper2001@...]
          Sent : 5/14/2008 9:25:32 PM
          To : sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
          Cc :
          Subject : RE: [SCA-JML] Re: kabuto

          My first kabuto was made that way with 16 Ga. sides, "mempo" and
          topped off with 1/4" round bar. I fought in it for several years and
          served me well. The WWII army pots have a special alloy. It welds
          normally but will dent easily. Since it is a work hardening steel do
          NOT attempt to remove any of those dents as it can cause it to crack.
          It does look decent but the spun domes are far better in the long
          run. If you intend to use an army pot be sure it is a WWII helmet and
          not a later one because the later ones are softer and will not stand
          up to the kind of punishment we will subject it to.

          Happy gunching!
          Ishikawa Moritake, the original "Jap Vader"

          --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "J. Norton" <princebeowulf@...> wrote:
          >
          > Has anyone done a kabuto using an older (WWII) steel military helmet
          as a shortcut for the body/bowl. It seems like this would save a
          significant amount of time even taking into consideration modifiying
          it cosmetically to appear to have been made of multi-plates et riveted.
          >
          > Is there a reason why I would not want to do this? (from a
          practical standpoint... I know there are myriad aesthetic reasons...)
          >
          > If someone has is there anything I need to be cautious of?
          >
          > Thanks
          >
          > Jeremy
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >



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        • Solveig Throndardottir
          Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! I haven t made a helmet in years, but converting a WWII US Army helmet sounds like rather a lot of work for what you
          Message 4 of 10 , May 14, 2008
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            Noble Cousins!

            Greetings from Solveig! I haven't made a helmet in years, but
            converting a WWII US Army helmet sounds like rather a lot of work for
            what you get. Why not just make a segmented Japanese helmet? There
            are probably plans posted to the Yama Kaminari web site.

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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