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Re: [SCA-JML] Re: Fuyu (was: name question)

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  • JL Badgley
    ... Good explanation. To delve a little further, this helps explain the (generally accepted) hypothesis that early h was usually p , such as Pimiko , and
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 24, 2008
      On Jan 24, 2008 4:35 PM, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...> wrote:

      > > I can't say for sure if it was this way in period, but in modern
      > > Japanese, the "f" is very soft, halfway to an "h" sound. You put your
      > > teeth near your lips, but not as tightly as an English "f", and then
      > > you make a little puff of air.
      >
      > Technically, the English F is a labial-dental sound while the
      > Japanese F is
      > a bilabial sound. This means that you must not put your upper teeth
      > against
      > your lower lip. Further, no cheating by putting them against the
      > middle of the
      > inside of the lower lip. Instead you put your two lips gently
      > together an sort of
      > blow.
      >
      Good explanation. To delve a little further, this helps explain the
      (generally accepted) hypothesis that early 'h' was usually 'p', such
      as 'Pimiko', and that 'B', 'P', and 'F' (as well as 'H') are all
      related in Japanese. Starting with 'P', if you slowly stop pursing
      your lips as tightly you might be able to see a possible evolution of
      the sound. At least, that's my take on it.

      I figure it is probably similar to ancient Greek, from which we get
      things like 'philosophia', where we also see a connection between the
      'p' and the 'f' sounds.

      -Ii
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