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Re: [SCA-JML] help - a garb question

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  • Andrew T Trembley
    ... Sleeves don t have to be that complicated, at least for guys. They do entirely depend on the period and the outfit, though. Check out Samurai Eye for the
    Message 1 of 49 , Dec 12, 2007
      On Dec 12, 2007, at 1:44 PM, Rie Miller wrote:
      > Okay, I'm a little cunfused on the sleeve thing, and nothing I have
      > found so
      > far explains it.
      > He's the 15 year old son of a merchant with military ambitions (who
      > owns two
      > dogs that walk themselves LOL)
      > What length would you suggest for his sleeves?
      >

      Sleeves don't have to be that complicated, at least for guys. They do
      entirely depend on the period and the outfit, though.

      Check out "Samurai Eye for the SCA Guy" <http://www.wodefordhall.com/
      samurai.htm> and you'll see examples of different SCA recreations of
      Japanese. They're all pretty good. Scroll down to the Kataginu
      Kamishimo section. You'll see several examples, including Ii-dono's
      fabulous striped ensemble.

      This is a good place to start withJapanese. It's a kosode (better 2
      layers of kosode), hakama (pants) and a kataginu (sleeveless jacket
      with open sides). It's a kataginu kamishimo if the top (kataginu) and
      bottom (hakama) match, but the garments don't have to match.

      That means you only have to worry about sleeves on the kosode. Since
      this is a garment that's named after the sleeves...

      Kosode, or small sleeves, aren't. They're big sleeves with a small
      opening. Standing with one's arms outstretched, kosode sleeves should:
      1. Be long enough to end between the mid-forearm and the wrist.
      Earlier-period illustrations tend to show wrist-length sleeves.
      2. Hang down to the natural waist or slightly above. They may be
      attached to the body of the garment all the way down, or a few inches
      at the bottom may hang loose from the body.

      I rather like Saionji-dono's Kosode page <http://www.wodefordhall.com/
      kosode.htm> but there are others out there too. I taught myself basic
      kimono construction from John Marshall's "Make your own Japanese
      Clothes." The instructions bounce all over the place (literally) so
      it requires a lot of patience, but it's good on figuring out pattern
      piece scale for a modern kimono, and adapting from there is pretty easy.

      For hakama, the Folkwear pattern isn't a bad start (but don't worry
      about the koshi-ita plate at the back, assemble both belts the same
      way). Kataginu are dirt-simple, and I believe there is a pattern in
      the group's files section.

      andy
    • wodeford
      ... sleeve length (it looks modern but at least it will give you an idea) - http://www.hanamiweb.com/kimono.html. It IS modern, especially all the stuff in
      Message 49 of 49 , Dec 17, 2007
        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Rich Goble <mcse4mci@...> wrote:
        >
        > Tachi swords were worn blade down, katana and wakazashi blade up.
        >
        > I just found a website today that elaborates on men's/women's
        sleeve length (it looks modern but at least it will give you an idea)
        - http://www.hanamiweb.com/kimono.html.

        It IS modern, especially all the stuff in section 3.1 about sleeves.
        It's a nice, basic overview if you're interested in the evolution of
        modern women's kimono, otherwise, it may just confuse you.

        Saionji no Hanae,
        West Kingdom
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