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Re: [SCA-JML] Rites of Spring

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  • Jamie Ritter
    I think Kam butsu e would be a good name for it since it is so close to the actual holiday. Hanami would generally take place later in the year when the cherry
    Message 1 of 25 , Nov 2, 2007
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      I think Kam'butsu'e would be a good name for it since it is so close to the actual holiday. Hanami would generally take place later in the year when the cherry blossoms start falling.

      I've got a firm grip on reality, now I can strangle it!!
      Lady Fuyutsukime Hattori
      (Hattori Fuyutsukime) mka
      Jamie Ritter



      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...>
      To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, November 2, 2007 2:17:14 PM
      Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Rites of Spring

      Noble Cousin!

      Greetings from Solveig! Thank you for correcting your spelling.
      Kam'butsu'e is the festival of
      the historical Buddha's birthday and takes place each April 8th.
      Hanami or Ohanami is the
      annual cherry blossom viewing festival and pretty-much varies in time
      by location.

      Your Humble Servant
      Solveig Throndardottir
      Amateur Scholar

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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    • Solveig Throndardottir
      Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... The thing that was confusing me about this event was that the note I read said that it was going to be a flower
      Message 2 of 25 , Nov 2, 2007
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        Noble Cousin!

        Greetings from Solveig!
        > I think Kam'butsu'e would be a good name for it since it is so
        > close to the actual holiday. Hanami would generally take place
        > later in the year when the cherry blossoms start falling.
        The thing that was confusing me about this event was that the note I
        read said that it was going to be a flower viewing festival. If you
        want to have a Japanese festival appropriate to the Japanese festival
        cycle, then Kan'butsu'e becomes quite interesting. There are books
        out there both in English and Japanese which describe activities for
        specific festivals.

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jamie Ritter
        Originally I was. LOL Then I found out there was an actual Japanese Holiday right around the timeframe for the event. I will definately have to start
        Message 3 of 25 , Nov 2, 2007
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          Originally I was. LOL Then I found out there was an actual Japanese Holiday right around the timeframe for the event. I will definately have to start researching Kam'butsu'e.

          I've got a firm grip on reality, now I can strangle it!!
          Lady Fuyutsukime Hattori
          (Hattori Fuyutsukime) mka
          Jamie Ritter



          ----- Original Message ----
          From: Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...>
          To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, November 2, 2007 3:05:01 PM
          Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Rites of Spring

          Noble Cousin!

          Greetings from Solveig!
          > I think Kam'butsu'e would be a good name for it since it is so
          > close to the actual holiday. Hanami would generally take place
          > later in the year when the cherry blossoms start falling.
          The thing that was confusing me about this event was that the note I
          read said that it was going to be a flower viewing festival. If you
          want to have a Japanese festival appropriate to the Japanese festival
          cycle, then Kan'butsu'e becomes quite interesting. There are books
          out there both in English and Japanese which describe activities for
          specific festivals.

          Your Humble Servant
          Solveig Throndardottir
          Amateur Scholar

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          __________________________________________________
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          Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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        • John Perrault
          Konbanwa, Seeing how I have a deep love of both modern and feudal Japanese culture I was thinking about a Japanese (Heian or Kamakura) persona.. My major
          Message 4 of 25 , Nov 2, 2007
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            Konbanwa,

            Seeing how I have a deep love of both modern and feudal Japanese culture
            I was thinking about a Japanese (Heian or Kamakura) persona.. My major
            problem is that I am 6'3" and like 320 pounds and very little of it
            muscle! Now from what I have seen the clothing seems to be fairly
            voluminous so I don't think I would look too bad in a very upscaled
            version I think, but I am by no means an expert in clothing medieval or
            modern! I am mainly looking for advice at the moment because my hand
            sewing skills are severely lacking and I haven't used a sewing machine
            in like 15 years (since Home Ec in grade 7!)

            Domo Arigatou,

            John Perrault
          • wodeford
            ... How very imposing you are going to look! You are absolutely right. Japanese clothing flatters a lot of body types if it s scaled to fit. I bet if you look
            Message 5 of 25 , Nov 3, 2007
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              --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, John Perrault <jpwic@...> wrote:
              > My major
              > problem is that I am 6'3" and like 320 pounds and very little of it
              > muscle!

              How very imposing you are going to look! You are absolutely right.
              Japanese clothing flatters a lot of body types if it's scaled to fit.
              I bet if you look at the contributing models on this page you could
              not tell me who the tall people are and who the short people are.
              http://wodefordhall.com/samurai.htm
              Why? Because their clothes fit and the fit of Japanese dress is BIG.

              As mentioned a few messages before you posted this one, scale is
              frequently an issue for those of us who are not built like
              medieval Japanese. Please take a look at my web page at
              http://www.wodefordhall.com/kosode.htm as I have instructions on how
              to measure yourself and calculate a panel width to accomodate the
              scale of your own body. Look for a sketch of a figure in kosode with
              arms stretched out like wings.

              Kosode are "double breasted." Your base panel measurement x 5 should
              be enough to wrap around you to the hip. If you carry a lot of weight
              around the belly, take your tape measure and wrap it around the widest
              part of the belly, going all the way around with one end starting at
              one hip and ending at the other hip so the tape overlaps in the front.
              This will tell you whether you need to bump the panel measurement upward.

              There's a hakama pattern in the "Files" section here at
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sca-jml/files/

              To scale your hakama, you'll need your waist measurement and a
              measurement of the drop from navel to floor (hemmed, they should hit
              you at the ankle bone.

              > I am mainly looking for advice at the moment because my hand
              > sewing skills are severely lacking and I haven't used a sewing
              > machine in like 15 years (since Home Ec in grade 7!)
              The good news is that Japanese garments are mostly rectangles and lots
              of straight seams. Collars are a little tricky and you'll have to do
              pleats on your hakama, but those are the most complex problems you'll
              have to tackle.

              I'm going to suggest that you start by mocking up a kosode in cheap
              white cotton muslin. It will allow you to get some sewing practice as
              well as being safe for mistake making and checking scale on
              inexpensive fabric - and if the result is wearable, you've got your
              undergarment layer!

              Good luck and welcome.

              Saionji no Hanae
              West Kingdom
            • Charlotte
              Hello! I was wondering if the red hakama / white kosode style?was appropriate for an 18-year-old woman? I love the look, it is very traditional and charming,
              Message 6 of 25 , Nov 3, 2007
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                Hello!

                I was wondering if the red hakama / white kosode style?was appropriate for an 18-year-old woman? I love the look, it is very traditional and charming, but I'm not sure it would be the right style for me to wear. I'd like to stay within the Kamakura period, however.

                Any tips would be appreciated. ^_^


                Peace, love, harmony, and all that jazz.
                Charlotte
                www.annunciata.net



                ________________________________________________________________________
                Email and AIM finally together. You've gotta check out free AOL Mail! - http://mail.aol.com


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              • wodeford
                ... appropriate for an 18-year-old woman? I love the look, it is very traditional and charming, but I m not sure it would be the right style for me to wear.
                Message 7 of 25 , Nov 3, 2007
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                  --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Charlotte <nyxnightingale@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello!
                  >
                  > I was wondering if the red hakama / white kosode style?was
                  appropriate for an 18-year-old woman? I love the look, it is very
                  traditional and charming, but I'm not sure it would be the right style
                  for me to wear. I'd like to stay within the Kamakura period, however.

                  Yes: You should at least have an uwagi to wear over it as well for
                  when you go out in public.

                  Saionji no Hanae
                  West Kingdom
                • Solveig Throndardottir
                  Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... You sound a bit undressed. However, you have a good start. I think that you should think about having both short and
                  Message 8 of 25 , Nov 3, 2007
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                    Noble Cousin!

                    Greetings from Solveig!

                    > I was wondering if the red hakama / white kosode style?was
                    > appropriate for an 18-year-old woman? I love the look, it is very
                    > traditional and charming, but I'm not sure it would be the right
                    > style for me to wear. I'd like to stay within the Kamakura period,
                    > however.

                    You sound a bit undressed. However, you have a good start. I think
                    that you should think about having both short and long hakama. Also,
                    I recommend a
                    hosonaga (looks a lot like a suikan). That should do really well for
                    Kamakura period before the Jokyu Disturbance. Also, I suggest
                    browsing the Kamakura
                    section of the costume museum.

                    Your Humble Servant
                    Solveig Throndardottir
                    Amateur Scholar





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • John Perrault
                    Thank you for your help!!! With that I have decided for now to go with a Japanese persona! I m going out tomorrow to start looking at sewing machines (nothing
                    Message 9 of 25 , Nov 4, 2007
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                      Thank you for your help!!! With that I have decided for now to go with a
                      Japanese persona! I'm going out tomorrow to start looking at sewing
                      machines (nothing fancy for me!!!) it's something I have been meaning to
                      do for ages but never got around to it, maybe Santa will be nice this
                      year if I drop a hint :) The construction for the kosode looks pretty
                      simple whats all the measurements are done and the fabric is cut! The
                      hakama though look more difficult and will probably take a lot of time
                      to get right.I imagine so I am sure I'll be writing plenty of emails
                      once I get to that point :)

                      Thank you

                      John


                      wodeford wrote:
                      >
                      > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sca-jml%40yahoogroups.com>,
                      > John Perrault <jpwic@...> wrote:
                      > > My major
                      > > problem is that I am 6'3" and like 320 pounds and very little of it
                      > > muscle!
                      >
                      > How very imposing you are going to look! You are absolutely right.
                      > Japanese clothing flatters a lot of body types if it's scaled to fit.
                      > I bet if you look at the contributing models on this page you could
                      > not tell me who the tall people are and who the short people are.
                      > http://wodefordhall.com/samurai.htm <http://wodefordhall.com/samurai.htm>
                      > Why? Because their clothes fit and the fit of Japanese dress is BIG.
                      >
                      > As mentioned a few messages before you posted this one, scale is
                      > frequently an issue for those of us who are not built like
                      > medieval Japanese. Please take a look at my web page at
                      > http://www.wodefordhall.com/kosode.htm
                      > <http://www.wodefordhall.com/kosode.htm> as I have instructions on how
                      > to measure yourself and calculate a panel width to accomodate the
                      > scale of your own body. Look for a sketch of a figure in kosode with
                      > arms stretched out like wings.
                      >
                      > Kosode are "double breasted." Your base panel measurement x 5 should
                      > be enough to wrap around you to the hip. If you carry a lot of weight
                      > around the belly, take your tape measure and wrap it around the widest
                      > part of the belly, going all the way around with one end starting at
                      > one hip and ending at the other hip so the tape overlaps in the front.
                      > This will tell you whether you need to bump the panel measurement upward.
                      >
                      > There's a hakama pattern in the "Files" section here at
                      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sca-jml/files/
                      > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sca-jml/files/>
                      >
                      > To scale your hakama, you'll need your waist measurement and a
                      > measurement of the drop from navel to floor (hemmed, they should hit
                      > you at the ankle bone.
                      >
                      > > I am mainly looking for advice at the moment because my hand
                      > > sewing skills are severely lacking and I haven't used a sewing
                      > > machine in like 15 years (since Home Ec in grade 7!)
                      > The good news is that Japanese garments are mostly rectangles and lots
                      > of straight seams. Collars are a little tricky and you'll have to do
                      > pleats on your hakama, but those are the most complex problems you'll
                      > have to tackle.
                      >
                      > I'm going to suggest that you start by mocking up a kosode in cheap
                      > white cotton muslin. It will allow you to get some sewing practice as
                      > well as being safe for mistake making and checking scale on
                      > inexpensive fabric - and if the result is wearable, you've got your
                      > undergarment layer!
                      >
                      > Good luck and welcome.
                      >
                      > Saionji no Hanae
                      > West Kingdom
                      >
                      > __.
                      >
                    • Andrew Trembley
                      ... Check out my Sewing Machine Shopper s Guide It should help you figure out
                      Message 10 of 25 , Nov 4, 2007
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                        > Thank you for your help!!! With that I have decided for now to go with a
                        > Japanese persona! I'm going out tomorrow to start looking at sewing
                        > machines (nothing fancy for me!!!) it's something I have been meaning to
                        > do for ages but never got around to it, maybe Santa will be nice this
                        > year if I drop a hint :)

                        Check out my "Sewing Machine Shopper's Guide"
                        <http://www.bovil.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=20&Itemid=48>

                        It should help you figure out what you need.

                        andy
                      • Ashina no Karasu
                        there is a company called folkwear patterns. the do a hakama pattern that I really enjoy and use frequently. it might help you when you get to that point.
                        Message 11 of 25 , Nov 4, 2007
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                          there is a company called folkwear patterns. the do a hakama pattern that I
                          really enjoy and use frequently. it might help you when you get to that
                          point. good luck

                          Ashina no karasu

                          On 11/4/07, Andrew Trembley <attrembl@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > > Thank you for your help!!! With that I have decided for now to go with
                          > a
                          > > Japanese persona! I'm going out tomorrow to start looking at sewing
                          > > machines (nothing fancy for me!!!) it's something I have been meaning to
                          > > do for ages but never got around to it, maybe Santa will be nice this
                          > > year if I drop a hint :)
                          >
                          > Check out my "Sewing Machine Shopper's Guide"
                          > <
                          > http://www.bovil.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=20&Itemid=48
                          > >
                          >
                          > It should help you figure out what you need.
                          >
                          > andy
                          >
                          >
                          >



                          --
                          Regards,

                          Brendan Barth
                          360-621-0011


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • wodeford
                          ... pattern that I ... NOTE: The Folkwear patterns are for clothing that postdates the SCA period and there are some stylistic differences. If you use the
                          Message 12 of 25 , Nov 4, 2007
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                            --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Ashina no Karasu"
                            <Ashina.no.karasu@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > there is a company called folkwear patterns. the do a hakama
                            pattern that I
                            > really enjoy and use frequently.

                            NOTE: The Folkwear patterns are for clothing that postdates the SCA
                            period and there are some stylistic differences. If you use the hakama
                            pattern, you can skip the koshi-ita, a trapezoidal stiffened panel at
                            the back waistband. Simply pleat the hakama legs into the waist ties
                            instead.

                            Their kataginu is very definitely a later style. Skip it and make one
                            using the jpgs in our "Files" section.

                            If you use the kimono pattern, round the corners of the sleeves. You
                            will most likely also have to cut everything a few inches wider -
                            modern kimono bolts are usually only 14.5" to 15".

                            Two sen worth,
                            Saionji no Hanae
                            West Kingdom
                          • Solveig Throndardottir
                            Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! As I recall at least, the folkwear patter is actually for monpe which are distinctly different from hakama. Your Humble
                            Message 13 of 25 , Nov 5, 2007
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                              Noble Cousins!

                              Greetings from Solveig! As I recall at least, the folkwear patter is
                              actually
                              for monpe which are distinctly different from hakama.

                              Your Humble Servant
                              Solveig Throndardottir
                              Amateur Scholar





                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Ashina no Karasu
                              The folkwear pattern is a seven panel hakama that needs slight alteration. the back koshi-ita needs to be removed in order to make it period. other than that
                              Message 14 of 25 , Nov 5, 2007
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                                The folkwear pattern is a seven panel hakama that needs slight alteration.
                                the back koshi-ita needs to be removed in order to make it period. other
                                than that it is a traditional hakama.

                                On 11/5/07, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Noble Cousins!
                                >
                                > Greetings from Solveig! As I recall at least, the folkwear patter is
                                > actually
                                > for monpe which are distinctly different from hakama.
                                >
                                > Your Humble Servant
                                > Solveig Throndardottir
                                > Amateur Scholar
                                >
                                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                >
                                >
                                >



                                --
                                Regards,

                                Brendan Barth
                                360-621-0011


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Jennifer Kobayashi
                                ... To minimize confusion, I will point out that there are _several_ Folkwear patterns based on various Japanese and other Asian garments - one of the patterns
                                Message 15 of 25 , Nov 5, 2007
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                                  --- Ashina no Karasu <Ashina.no.karasu@...>
                                  wrote:

                                  > The folkwear pattern is a seven panel hakama that
                                  > needs slight alteration.
                                  > the back koshi-ita needs to be removed in order to
                                  > make it period. other
                                  > than that it is a traditional hakama.
                                  >
                                  > On 11/5/07, Solveig Throndardottir
                                  > <nostrand@...> wrote:

                                  > > Greetings from Solveig! As I recall at least, the
                                  > > folkwear patter is
                                  > > actually for monpe which are distinctly different
                                  > > from hakama.

                                  To minimize confusion, I will point out that there are
                                  _several_ Folkwear patterns based on various Japanese
                                  and other Asian garments - one of the patterns is #112
                                  Japanese Field Clothing which includes monpei and
                                  another is #151 Japanese Hakama and Kataginu. See, you
                                  are both right!

                                  http://www.folkwear.com/asian.html

                                  I'm not recommending them, just pointing out that they
                                  are there. And that there are several.

                                  Ki no Izumi/Jennifer

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                                • DinoKruz@aol.com
                                  16th century armor - 6 or 7 suits Feudal japan , encampment, field armoury etc kauzohiro sgb
                                  Message 16 of 25 , Nov 5, 2007
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                                    16th century armor - 6 or 7 suits
                                    Feudal japan , encampment, field armoury etc

                                    kauzohiro
                                    sgb


                                    ________________________________________________________________________
                                    Email and AIM finally together. You've gotta check out free AOL Mail! - http://mail.aol.com


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                                  • Ashina no Karasu
                                    Thank you for the clarity. Ashina no Karasu ... -- Regards, Brendan Barth 360-621-0011 [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    Message 17 of 25 , Nov 6, 2007
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                                      Thank you for the clarity.

                                      Ashina no Karasu

                                      On 11/5/07, Jennifer Kobayashi <jhkob@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > --- Ashina no Karasu <Ashina.no.karasu@...<Ashina.no.karasu%40gmail.com>
                                      > >
                                      > wrote:
                                      >
                                      > > The folkwear pattern is a seven panel hakama that
                                      > > needs slight alteration.
                                      > > the back koshi-ita needs to be removed in order to
                                      > > make it period. other
                                      > > than that it is a traditional hakama.
                                      > >
                                      > > On 11/5/07, Solveig Throndardottir
                                      > > <nostrand@... <nostrand%40acm.org>> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > > > Greetings from Solveig! As I recall at least, the
                                      > > > folkwear patter is
                                      > > > actually for monpe which are distinctly different
                                      > > > from hakama.
                                      >
                                      > To minimize confusion, I will point out that there are
                                      > _several_ Folkwear patterns based on various Japanese
                                      > and other Asian garments - one of the patterns is #112
                                      > Japanese Field Clothing which includes monpei and
                                      > another is #151 Japanese Hakama and Kataginu. See, you
                                      > are both right!
                                      >
                                      > http://www.folkwear.com/asian.html
                                      >
                                      > I'm not recommending them, just pointing out that they
                                      > are there. And that there are several.
                                      >
                                      > Ki no Izumi/Jennifer
                                      >
                                      > __________________________________________________
                                      > Do You Yahoo!?
                                      > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                                      > http://mail.yahoo.com
                                      >
                                      >



                                      --
                                      Regards,

                                      Brendan Barth
                                      360-621-0011


                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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