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Re: [SCA-JML] Bonsai Cutter

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  • sigrune@aol.com
    Those are interesting blades. They are sometimes classed and noted as doctor s knives a few edo period doctors were noted to carry such blades, the
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 1, 2007
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      Those are interesting blades.

      They are sometimes classed and noted as "doctor's knives"
      a few edo period doctors were noted to carry such blades, the speculation goes that they were more useful as tools instead of as weapons... no thrusting point... personally I do not believe this particular theory.

      A few reserarchers feel that they are (or are new-made copies of) larger blades that have been broken and reworked. The most common method of construction: soft core steel surrounded on the edge and sides by a hard steel; needs to have the hard steel come past the end of the core to provide a functional tip to a sword or knife. If this is broken or lost, the remaining portion only has the hard steel on the cutting edge, to place a conventional kissaki on it, would result in most of the kissaki being of core steel which will never harden.

      By "reversing" the kissaki (like a scandinavian seax) you will still have quite a functional cutting tip, without having to severly re-work the piece. (thus risking delamination of welds, when reforging as well as excessive carbon loss)

      If you look at many japanese utility knives and kitchen knives you will see that seax like shape, the prevalent theory is the design was more economical to make with less chance of failure in construction by the less skilled cutlery makers. (speculation of broken/failed/worn-out nihonto being made into common household cutlery never goes over well... but lets face it practically wise, I am sure local blacksmiths reworked quite a few military arms into tools and cutlery for the local populous when their condition was too poor to sell or trade. Steel has always been valuable to most cultures and very much so in Japan.

      -Takeda
    • David Nesmith
      Added to this description, utility knives often are beveled on only one side to make construction and sharpening easier. One sided blades, if laminated at
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 1, 2007
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        Added to this description, utility knives often are beveled on only one side to make construction and sharpening easier. One sided blades, if laminated at all, were only 2 layers, one hard and one soft, and not folded. Obviously, the hard steel would be on the flat side so that it will be exposed on the edge.

        Ishikawa

        sigrune@... wrote: Those are interesting blades.

        They are sometimes classed and noted as "doctor's knives"
        a few edo period doctors were noted to carry such blades, the speculation goes that they were more useful as tools instead of as weapons... no thrusting point... personally I do not believe this particular theory.

        A few reserarchers feel that they are (or are new-made copies of) larger blades that have been broken and reworked. The most common method of construction: soft core steel surrounded on the edge and sides by a hard steel; needs to have the hard steel come past the end of the core to provide a functional tip to a sword or knife. If this is broken or lost, the remaining portion only has the hard steel on the cutting edge, to place a conventional kissaki on it, would result in most of the kissaki being of core steel which will never harden.

        By "reversing" the kissaki (like a scandinavian seax) you will still have quite a functional cutting tip, without having to severly re-work the piece. (thus risking delamination of welds, when reforging as well as excessive carbon loss)

        If you look at many japanese utility knives and kitchen knives you will see that seax like shape, the prevalent theory is the design was more economical to make with less chance of failure in construction by the less skilled cutlery makers. (speculation of broken/failed/worn-out nihonto being made into common household cutlery never goes over well... but lets face it practically wise, I am sure local blacksmiths reworked quite a few military arms into tools and cutlery for the local populous when their condition was too poor to sell or trade. Steel has always been valuable to most cultures and very much so in Japan.

        -Takeda





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      • sigrune@aol.com
        ... Not only utility knives, there were a good number of buke blades in the latter part of the koto period that had that construction, though it was found more
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 1, 2007
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          David Nesmith writes:

          >...utility knives often are beveled on only one side to
          >make construction and sharpening easier.

          Not only utility knives, there were a good number of buke blades in the latter part of the koto period that had that construction, though it was found more often on the shorter blades, it was probably a way to simplify construction, the majority of the blades that exhibit it are of average-poor quality, and that period coinsides with some of the highest volume of historical blade production.

          -Takeda
        • Sean Malloy
          ... Also, as it was explained to me in the class on making sushi that I took, a blade that is beveled on both sides, if not cutting straight down through
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 6, 2007
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            --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, David Nesmith <txpiper2001@...> wrote:
            >
            > Added to this description, utility knives often are beveled on only
            > one side to make construction and sharpening easier. One sided
            > blades, if laminated at all, were only 2 layers, one hard and one
            > soft, and not folded. Obviously, the hard steel would be on the flat
            > side so that it will be exposed on the edge.

            Also, as it was explained to me in the class on making sushi that I
            took, a blade that is beveled on both sides, if not cutting straight
            down through something, will tend to twist toward a more horizontal
            position, making it difficult to make an angled slice that removes a
            piece of constant thickness, which is important when making sushi.
            Using a blade with a single bevel, and held with that bevel on the
            upper side, lets the blade make a straight cut through the object
            without twisting. How recent that attention to detail is -- or, at
            least, that _explanation_ of what it is for -- I don't know.
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