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Re: Tabi

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  • wodeford
    ... Those are gaki zoshi, hungry spirits. If you do something REALLY bad in a previous incarnation, you come back as one of these creatures, eternally
    Message 1 of 19 , Aug 12, 2007
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      --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, David Nesmith <txpiper2001@...> wrote:
      >
      > very interesting. any idea who/what the dark skinned creatures were?

      Those are gaki zoshi, hungry spirits. If you do something REALLY bad
      in a previous incarnation, you come back as one of these creatures,
      eternally hungering for human waste.

      The Gaki Zoshi scroll in the Tokyo National Museum is definitely not
      for the easily grossed out, but it contains some interesting images of
      life in 12th century Japan, including an aristocratic feast, a woman
      in childbirth, and the one I posted earlier.

      Saionji no Hanae
      West
    • Nick starnes
      This scroll brings up the point of hygiene. If i may inquire. 1: was it a common practice for the people to do (Natures call) in the villages proximity like
      Message 2 of 19 , Aug 13, 2007
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        This scroll brings up the point of hygiene. If i may inquire.
        1: was it a common practice for the people to do (Natures call) in the villages proximity like the scroll implies?
        2: were they so immodest about it?
        3: was there any form of clean-up after the fact. (Did they bury it, and use some sort of item to wipe)

        Points of History not often discussed but I'm curious. The Japanese seem such clean conscious and proper people, i have often wondered about their sanitation practices.

        Hasekura Masashige

        wodeford <wodeford@...> wrote:
        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, David Nesmith <txpiper2001@...> wrote:
        >
        > very interesting. any idea who/what the dark skinned creatures were?

        Those are gaki zoshi, hungry spirits. If you do something REALLY bad
        in a previous incarnation, you come back as one of these creatures,
        eternally hungering for human waste.

        The Gaki Zoshi scroll in the Tokyo National Museum is definitely not
        for the easily grossed out, but it contains some interesting images of
        life in 12th century Japan, including an aristocratic feast, a woman
        in childbirth, and the one I posted earlier.

        Saionji no Hanae
        West






        ---------------------------------
        Building a website is a piece of cake.
        Yahoo! Small Business gives you all the tools to get online.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • JL Badgley
        This might not fully answer the question, but be of some interest:
        Message 3 of 19 , Aug 14, 2007
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          This might not fully answer the question, but be of some interest:

          http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0074-02762003000900019&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt

          -Ii

          On 8/13/07, Nick starnes <vns2112@...> wrote:
          >
          > This scroll brings up the point of hygiene. If i may inquire.
          > 1: was it a common practice for the people to do (Natures call) in the
          > villages proximity like the scroll implies?
          > 2: were they so immodest about it?
          > 3: was there any form of clean-up after the fact. (Did they bury it, and
          > use some sort of item to wipe)
          >
          > Points of History not often discussed but I'm curious. The Japanese seem
          > such clean conscious and proper people, i have often wondered about their
          > sanitation practices.
          >
          > Hasekura Masashige
          >
          > wodeford <wodeford@... <wodeford%40yahoo.com>> wrote:
          > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com <sca-jml%40yahoogroups.com>, David Nesmith
          > <txpiper2001@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > very interesting. any idea who/what the dark skinned creatures were?
          >
          > Those are gaki zoshi, hungry spirits. If you do something REALLY bad
          > in a previous incarnation, you come back as one of these creatures,
          > eternally hungering for human waste.
          >
          > The Gaki Zoshi scroll in the Tokyo National Museum is definitely not
          > for the easily grossed out, but it contains some interesting images of
          > life in 12th century Japan, including an aristocratic feast, a woman
          > in childbirth, and the one I posted earlier.
          >
          > Saionji no Hanae
          > West
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Building a website is a piece of cake.
          > Yahoo! Small Business gives you all the tools to get online.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Nick starnes
          Outstanding info site. Arigato Gozaimasu JL Badgley wrote: This might not fully answer the question, but be of some interest:
          Message 4 of 19 , Aug 14, 2007
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            Outstanding info site.

            Arigato Gozaimasu

            JL Badgley <tatsushu@...> wrote:
            This might not fully answer the question, but be of some interest:

            http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0074-02762003000900019&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt

            -Ii

            On 8/13/07, Nick starnes <vns2112@...> wrote:
            >
            > This scroll brings up the point of hygiene. If i may inquire.
            > 1: was it a common practice for the people to do (Natures call) in the
            > villages proximity like the scroll implies?
            > 2: were they so immodest about it?
            > 3: was there any form of clean-up after the fact. (Did they bury it, and
            > use some sort of item to wipe)
            >
            > Points of History not often discussed but I'm curious. The Japanese seem
            > such clean conscious and proper people, i have often wondered about their
            > sanitation practices.
            >
            > Hasekura Masashige
            >
            > wodeford <wodeford@... <wodeford%40yahoo.com>> wrote:
            > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com <sca-jml%40yahoogroups.com>, David Nesmith
            > <txpiper2001@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > very interesting. any idea who/what the dark skinned creatures were?
            >
            > Those are gaki zoshi, hungry spirits. If you do something REALLY bad
            > in a previous incarnation, you come back as one of these creatures,
            > eternally hungering for human waste.
            >
            > The Gaki Zoshi scroll in the Tokyo National Museum is definitely not
            > for the easily grossed out, but it contains some interesting images of
            > life in 12th century Japan, including an aristocratic feast, a woman
            > in childbirth, and the one I posted earlier.
            >
            > Saionji no Hanae
            > West
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Building a website is a piece of cake.
            > Yahoo! Small Business gives you all the tools to get online.
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






            ---------------------------------
            Boardwalk for $500? In 2007? Ha!
            Play Monopoly Here and Now (it's updated for today's economy) at Yahoo! Games.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Solveig Throndardottir
            Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... No. They are gaki (hungry ghosts) which consitute one of the 6 evil rebirths possible in Buddhist cosmology. Your
            Message 5 of 19 , Aug 14, 2007
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              Noble Cousin!

              Greetings from Solveig!

              > very interesting. any idea who/what the dark skinned creatures
              > were? Ainu perhaps?

              No. They are "gaki" (hungry ghosts) which consitute one of the 6
              "evil" rebirths possible in Buddhist cosmology.

              Your Humble Servant
              Solveig Throndardottir
              Amateur Scholar





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Solveig Throndardottir
              Saionji hime! Greetings from Solveig! ... Ahh. They also eat the dead and are associated with grave yards. Also, zoshi is a literary form and not part of the
              Message 6 of 19 , Aug 14, 2007
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                Saionji hime!

                Greetings from Solveig!

                > Those are gaki zoshi, hungry spirits. If you do something REALLY bad
                > in a previous incarnation, you come back as one of these creatures,
                > eternally hungering for human waste.

                Ahh. They also eat the dead and are associated with grave yards. Also,
                "zoshi" is a literary form and not part of the word for the things.

                Your Humble Servant
                Solveig Throndardottir
                Amateur Scholar





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Solveig Throndardottir
                Ii dono! Greetings from Solveig! ... Yes, that is an early version of the traditional Japanese toilet. I ve got a similar picture in a book povocatively called
                Message 7 of 19 , Aug 14, 2007
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                  Ii dono!

                  Greetings from Solveig!

                  > http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?
                  > script=sci_arttext&pid=S0074-02762003000900019&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt

                  Yes, that is an early version of the traditional Japanese toilet.
                  I've got a similar picture in a book povocatively called "Benjo no
                  Hanashi" ISBN: 430609295X.

                  Your Humble Servant
                  Solveig Throndardottir
                  Amateur Scholar





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Solveig Throndardottir
                  Ii dono! Greetings from Solveig! ... The drawing you found of the continuous flush toilet seems a bit clearer to me than the diagram for the same in Benjo no
                  Message 8 of 19 , Aug 14, 2007
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                    Ii dono!

                    Greetings from Solveig!

                    > http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?
                    > script=sci_arttext&pid=S0074-02762003000900019&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt

                    The drawing you found of the continuous flush toilet seems a bit
                    clearer to me than the diagram for the same in
                    "Benjo no Hanashi".

                    Your Humble Servant
                    Solveig Throndardottir
                    Amateur Scholar





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • wodeford
                    ... Absolutely. One of the scenes depicted in the scroll owned by the Tokyo National Museum is a graveyard feast. Glad to see you made it home all right.
                    Message 9 of 19 , Aug 14, 2007
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                      --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...>
                      wrote:
                      > Ahh. They also eat the dead and are associated with grave yards.

                      Absolutely. One of the scenes depicted in the scroll owned by the
                      Tokyo National Museum is a graveyard "feast."

                      Glad to see you made it home all right.

                      Saionji no Hanae
                      West Kingdom
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