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Re: [SCA-JML] A question of Titles

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  • JL Badgley
    ... Kami appears to be a kun yomi, or native Japanese, word, from what I can tell. When they imported the Chinese system of titles they used the various
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 2 5:16 PM
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      On 7/1/07, --- M. <patriot014@...> wrote:
      > However, some court titles ending in "kami" were not governorships: for
      > instance, "Genba no Kami." "Kami" in the case of governorship is written
      > with the kanji that means "to protect," but the kami of Genba no Kami is the
      > character alternately read "kashira," which can mean "head" or "leader." I'm
      > not sure what "Genba no Kami" means, though. "Nui no Kami" is written with
      > the same "kami," and I believe it was the title of the head of the court
      > needlework bureau.

      'Kami' appears to be a kun'yomi, or native Japanese, word, from what I
      can tell. When they imported the Chinese system of titles they used
      the various Chinese kanji for the titles, but 'kami' was still the
      'head' person in many of the organizations, despite how it was
      spelled.

      I'm not sure if there is a relationship, but I notice that 'kami' can
      mean 'god/spirit', 'upper', or 'head (of a group)', among other
      things. I've often wondered if these aren't all from the same root
      word, linguistically.


      -Ii
    • Solveig Throndardottir
      Ii dono! Greetings from Solveig! Alas, all of my Japanese linguistics books appear to be in storage at the moment. Also, as I will be forced to relocate very
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 2 6:24 PM
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        Ii dono!

        Greetings from Solveig! Alas, all of my Japanese linguistics books
        appear to be in storage at the moment. Also, as I will be forced to
        relocate very soon, things are much more likely to go into storage
        than to come out of storage for some time.

        Regardless, you might check out the books by Roy Andrew Miller
        or Susumu Kono. (Note. These names are from memory and may
        not be accurate.)

        While I do have my copy of Phonology of 8th Century Japanese
        out on the shelf, that will not help answer your current question.

        However, please remember that kami also means "hair" and "paper".
        The various kanji used in titles appear to be consistently read as
        "nokami". However, there are a few other headman titles which
        appear to be rather older.

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar





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