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Re: [SCA-JML] New here

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  • Anthony J. Bryant
    ... The latter case isn t that good as an example. Hearn became a naturalized Japanese citizen, and Japanese laws require a Japanese name on the family
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 28, 2000
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      Barbara Nostrand wrote:

      >
      > As for names. Japanese Christians had transliterated baptismal
      > names. However, William Adams (aka. Blackthorn) was given a more
      > or less Japanese name. The Japanese knew him as Miura Anjin.
      > Another famous example from rather later is Lafcadio Hearn who
      > wound up with a Japanese name.

      The latter case isn't that good as an example. Hearn became a naturalized
      Japanese citizen, and Japanese laws require a Japanese name on the family
      registry, so with his naturalization he *ceased* being Lafcadio Hearn and
      *became* Koizumi Yakumo.

      The first case is better, of course; as William Adams was known in Japan by
      the *sobriquet* Miura Anjin (or, perhaps more accurately, Miura no Anjin)
      while he actually remained William Adams, and this is how he is referred to
      in the English factory documents and correspondence.

      Westerners in Japan were referred to or addressed by one of three ways:
      (1) some butchering of their names in Japanese pronunciation,
      (2) their title in Japanese, (e.g., "senchou" for "captain" of a ship), or
      a neologism in Japanese for a foreign term (such as "bateren" for "padre"
      and "iruman" for "irmao"), or
      (3) a nickname or sobriquet (e.g., "Miura no Anjin" [the Pilot of Miura] or
      "Tsuku" [the Translator]).


      Effingham
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