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Fwd: [Japanophiles] SUN TZU and the Art of Medieval Japanese Warfare

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  • Charles Martin
    FYI, I ve got no financial interest in Rolomail or Mangain. Although as much money as I ve spent with them, they *ought* to give me stock.... -- Mugyo ...
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 13, 2007
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      FYI, I've got no financial interest in Rolomail or Mangain. Although
      as much money as I've spent with them, they *ought* to give me
      stock.... -- Mugyo

      ---------- Forwarded message ----------
      From: Trading Department <trade@...>
      Date: Jun 13, 2007 5:58 PM
      Subject: [Japanophiles] SUN TZU and the Art of Medieval Japanese Warfare
      To: japanophiles@...


      Dear Japanophiles,

      In 1983, my sister was reading James Clavell's "Asian Saga"; the 6
      novel series including Shogun (Japan 1600), Tai-Pan (Hong Kong 1841),
      Gai-Jin (Japan 1862), King-Rat (Japanese POW camp 1945), Noble House
      (Hong Kong 1963), and Whirlwind (Iran 1979). That was also the year
      Clavell reworked Lionel Giles' translation of Sun Tzu, Art of War.
      She passed that one on to me. Clavell peppered his "Art of War" with
      hundreds of examples in Chinese and Japanese history where Sun Tzu's
      principles were applied or not applied to martial success and failure.
      I own Ralph Sawyer's translation of Sun Tzu now, but it doesn't have
      much to say about Sun Tzu's impact on Japan. That's why I was so
      delighted to see a truly Japan centric work on the matter, which was
      just published last year, which was written by Cambridge educated
      Japan scholar Roald Knutsen. So I've purchases a few superb hardcover
      copies for those with a similar love for Sun Tzu and Japan's ancient
      warrior culture.

      "For the first time, this study examines in depth how the medieval
      Japanese masters of Heiho - the Art of War - sought to interpret,
      illustrate and transmit the principles of China's time-honoured
      military strategist Sun Tzu during possibly the most turbulent period
      of Japanese history, the war-torn Muromachi period (c. 1350 - 1575).
      In these two centuries a number of gifted warriors, steeped in the
      teachings of Sun Tzu and the Chinese military classics, developed
      their own concepts of the arts of warfare, expressed in personal
      combat, to heights of formidable effectiveness."




      SUN TZU and the Art of Medieval Japanese Warfare
      http://www.rolomail.com/cgi-bin/sanadd.pl?72-72


      BTW, John found some misplaced Mangajin Issue 52, so its back as a rare issue.

      Best regards,
      Jim
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