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Re: [SCA-JML] Name issue...

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  • Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.)
    ... Unfortunately, your position is not uncommon. When a friend and I took names for our Japanese class we ended up taking Ryuo and Tatsushu for no
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 28, 2006
      On 10/19/06, oy2001 <Oy2001@...> wrote:
      >
      > I may have to change my name in the SCA. What ever will I do?
      >
      > Here's the deal: based on a remembered reading that the medieval (and
      > modern) name in Japan for the star cluster we call The Pleiades was/is
      > "Subaru" (pronounced, or so I remembered reading, with the emphasis on
      > the middle syllable, "suBAHru"). I am deeply attached to this star
      > cluster, so I made my name "Shichiro Subaru".
      >
      > However, I cannot find any documentation of this prenom ANYWHERE, now
      > that it comes to it.
      >
      Unfortunately, your position is not uncommon. When a friend and I
      took 'names' for our Japanese class we ended up taking 'Ryuo' and
      'Tatsushu' for no other reason than that they were listed in the name
      book and had a single stroke different ('shu' v. 'ou') and we wanted
      to give the teacher a hard time. Needless to say, when it came to
      choosing a Japanese persona for the SCA, both these names (which I did
      give some consideration to) went pretty quickly out the window (I
      could possibly have justified 'Ryuo' as a locative, but it would have
      been tricky).

      My advice, at this point, is to do two things:

      1) Go through books on Japanese family names and choose one that you
      like. Remember, there are only a handful of names that will probably
      be forbidden because it would be presumptuous (e.g. Toyotomi and
      Tokugawa), so just about any family name you can date to pre-1600 is
      workable. Even a lot of the older names (e.g. Imibe) stick around as
      family names later on.

      2) Go through similar sources for first names. It sounds like you
      like 'Subaru', and 'Saborou' may be your choice, but look through them
      and try them out. Sign your posts with them several times and see if
      you like it.

      As for getting people to recognize you for your new name, there are
      several tricks I've heard of. One trick is don't care. If someone is
      trying to get your attention, does it matter what name you use?
      Heralds will usually (not always) ask about your name before calling
      you into court.

      You could likewise ignore people calling your 'old' name, or look at
      them and ask 'are you talking to me?'--this can be off-putting, though
      it works for some.

      One thing someone I know tried with great effect was to bring candy to
      the event. When they met someone that knew their 'old' name, they
      would have them repeat the new name several times and then hand out
      sweets to those who remembered to use the new name. This method was
      the most loved by all, I do believe.

      So, I hope that helps some. http://sengokudaimyo.com has some good
      resources, and Solveig's book on Japanese names is also a great
      source. Turnbull has some decent stuff, but it is limited and
      sometimes harder to pass than just quoting chapter and verse from a
      known name source like Solveig's book.

      -Ii
    • Alex Cunningham
      Thanks Ii-dono. I LOVE that last suggestion. It s just the kind of nonsense I d pull if I d thought of it first, but I ll give you credit instead! ... Access
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 29, 2006
        Thanks Ii-dono. I LOVE that last suggestion. It's just the kind of nonsense I'd pull if I'd thought of it first, but I'll give you credit instead!


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      • Solveig Throndardottir
        Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! Both Saburou (#3 son) and Shichirou (#7 son) are numeric names which are typically middle names. Generally speaking,
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 1, 2006
          Noble Cousin!

          Greetings from Solveig! Both Saburou (#3 son) and Shichirou (#7 son)
          are numeric names which are typically middle names.

          Generally speaking, neither uji names nor family names are based on
          constellations.

          There is NO stress accent in Japanese. There IS pitch accent.

          Daijirin has four entries which are read as "subaru"

          1. The Japanese name for the Pleiades.
          2. The name of a magazine named after the constellation.
          3. A verb meaning to become small.
          4. A verb meaning to gather together to become one.

          None of these are the stuff of a family name or an uji. Neither are
          the stuff of a nanori.

          The accent pattern given for "subaru" (the constellation) is SUbaru
          with SU taking a higher tone and the rest being lower and flat.

          The way to stay deeply attached to the constellation is to adopt it
          as your kamon. There is an example of a constellation being used in
          Japanese heraldry. The way to do this is to draw the stars as dots
          and connect them with lines,. HOWEVER, the College of Arms will
          probably refuse to register this design using two arguments against
          it: 1) The use of "thin line" heraldry, 2) Lack of recongnizability.

          Your Humble Servant
          Solveig Throndardottir
          Amateur Scholar
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