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Re: [SCA-JML] true or false

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  • Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.)
    ... First, I m assuming we are talking about Sengoku and later, because I m not sure about Kamakura and Muromachi, but I suspect that you get a different take
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 26 10:05 PM
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      On 8/26/06, Park McKellop <squire009@...> wrote:
      >
      > How about this question, then...
      >
      > Under what circumstances would you likely find a member of the samurai class w/o his wakizashi? This might give our new reader a better idea. I know that the katana might be left at the door when entering a home, or in other situations, but I don't know of similar ones for the short sword.
      >
      First, I'm assuming we are talking about Sengoku and later, because
      I'm not sure about Kamakura and Muromachi, but I suspect that you get
      a different take on things.

      Swords came to symbolize that you were a warrior. From pictoral
      evidence, I would say that you start to see them be a status symbol in
      the Muromachi on into the Sengoku. I believe that this was further
      the case when the Sword Hunt(s) took place, as it was an overt attempt
      to keep swords out of 'unauthorized' (ie non-samurai) hands.

      Some time during or before the Sengoku period, swords apparently
      became common to wear in everyday life. I'm willing to bet a lot of
      this had to do with the 'Sen' of 'Sengoku'--the chaos and anarchy of
      decades of civil war has a tendancy to reward those who keep
      themselves armed and vigilant.

      In the Edo period, the norm appears to have been to take off your long
      sword when entering a building, unless you were, as the military might
      say, 'under arms'. However, a wakizashi or tanto (and before Edo
      period regulations I believe that the line is rather blurred between
      the two) appears to have been an acceptable accessory, rather like
      wearing a utility knife on a belt. Still, I don't think that you
      would necessarily keep it on you if you were in a relaxed setting,
      such as your own home.

      Just some observations from a tired Ii who should be cleaning up his
      hotel room and getting ready to roll out tomorrow at 4am.

      -Ii
    • wodeford
      ... agree that it s probably registerable. That said, I ve been poking around google, and I haven t found any mention of period use of yukiko in particular,
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 26 11:04 PM
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        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Franzi Dickson <fdickson@...> wrote:
        > I've heard some complaints about the overuse of -ko names, but I
        agree that it's probably registerable. That said, I've been poking
        around google, and I haven't found any mention of period use of
        'yukiko' in particular, much less with the snow kanji.

        Evidently it IS registerable. There is someone named Higashiyama
        Yukiko who was registered in 2003.
        http://oanda.sca.org/cgi-bin/oanda_np.cgi?a=disabled&b=broad&c=case-insensitive&d=modern&g=disabled&l=500&p=%5cbyukiko%5cb&s=name+only

        Saionji Why didn't I think to check the O & A earlier no Hanae
        West Kingdom
      • Franzi
        ... That is a good sign, though it still doesn t prove that the snow +child combination of characters was used in period. (I realize it doesn t matter for
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 27 8:08 AM
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          On Aug 27, 2006, at 2:04 AM, wodeford wrote:
          > Evidently it IS registerable. There is someone named Higashiyama
          > Yukiko who was registered in 2003.
          That is a good sign, though it still doesn't prove that the snow
          +child combination of characters was used in period. (I realize it
          doesn't matter for registering the name, but it is interesting to note.)

          --Franzi
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