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Re: First names? (newbie)

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  • mistresschief
    Hmmmmm.... I guess I just don t get the difference between onyomi and the other one clearly enough. Many people have suggested I go to this site:
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 4, 2006
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      Hmmmmm....

      I guess I just don't get the difference between onyomi and the other
      one clearly enough. Many people have suggested I go to this site:

      http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/miscellany/names.html

      It all sounded plausible, which is how I figured out the alternative
      name. Are you saying that this information is more intended for
      Chinese (onyomi) rather than Japanese? And that the Chinese version is
      more apt for nuns? It would appear that your book would seem the only
      accurate information for Japanese names out there; at this time
      however I really can't afford it. I will try my local library to see
      if they have it (doubtful, but you never know). If you could suggest
      an alternative online wealth of information I would most appreciate it!

      Alas, I have to agree that my hat would appear to be too small. I'll
      have to keep looking, perhaps check out a flea market or garage sale
      if I ever get a weekend off!

      Thanks again for all your help!



      --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Noble Cousin!
      >
      > Greetings from Solveig!
      >
      > > So, with all this help and insight, and some more research on my part,
      > > would a better name for me be Matsushima O-suiren? (and just how would
      > > I pronounce the Suiren part?).
      >
      > Sui is pronounced SUE-EE as in calling pigs. Ren is pronounced as in
      > Ren & Stimpy.
      > However, these are both ON-YOMI readings. Are you planning on being a
      > nun or something?
      >
      > Your humble Servant
      > Solveig Throndardottir
      > Amateur Scholar
      >
    • mistresschief
      I m assuming that most people are at Pennsic at the moment (deep sigh).....wish I was! Damn mundane life for interfering with my social life! I did a bit more
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 13, 2006
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        I'm assuming that most people are at Pennsic at the moment (deep
        sigh).....wish I was! Damn mundane life for interfering with my social
        life!

        I did a bit more research, so humbly asking if the name Katou O -
        Tatsuko would be better?

        I think in regards to the hat I'm going to have to bite the bullet and
        order the biggest gasa hat I can find from Japan; I really like the
        ichime gasa but it would have to be at 10 cm wider to be wider than my
        shoulders!

        Another question I have is about footwear. I have a very nice pair of
        lacquered geta; according to a kimono book I have geta are more casual
        and zori (the flat ones) are more formal. Is this true in the medieval
        time period as well, or just now?

        Hope you are all enjoying yourselves at Pennsic or at home as the case
        may be. Thanks again for all your help!

        Monika


        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "mistresschief" <mistresschief@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hmmmmm....
        >
        > I guess I just don't get the difference between onyomi and the other
        > one clearly enough. Many people have suggested I go to this site:
        >
        > http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/miscellany/names.html
        >
        > It all sounded plausible, which is how I figured out the alternative
        > name. Are you saying that this information is more intended for
        > Chinese (onyomi) rather than Japanese? And that the Chinese version is
        > more apt for nuns? It would appear that your book would seem the only
        > accurate information for Japanese names out there; at this time
        > however I really can't afford it. I will try my local library to see
        > if they have it (doubtful, but you never know). If you could suggest
        > an alternative online wealth of information I would most appreciate it!
        >
        > Alas, I have to agree that my hat would appear to be too small. I'll
        > have to keep looking, perhaps check out a flea market or garage sale
        > if I ever get a weekend off!
        >
        > Thanks again for all your help!
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Noble Cousin!
        > >
        > > Greetings from Solveig!
        > >
        > > > So, with all this help and insight, and some more research on my
        part,
        > > > would a better name for me be Matsushima O-suiren? (and just how
        would
        > > > I pronounce the Suiren part?).
        > >
        > > Sui is pronounced SUE-EE as in calling pigs. Ren is pronounced as in
        > > Ren & Stimpy.
        > > However, these are both ON-YOMI readings. Are you planning on
        being a
        > > nun or something?
        > >
        > > Your humble Servant
        > > Solveig Throndardottir
        > > Amateur Scholar
        > >
        >
      • wodeford
        ... I think (and I will happily defer to our onomasticists) that it would be either Tatsuko or O-tatsu, but not both. ... I hear that. Try the Warring States
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 13, 2006
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          --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "mistresschief" <mistresschief@...> wrote:
          > I did a bit more research, so humbly asking if the name Katou O -
          > Tatsuko would be better?

          I think (and I will happily defer to our onomasticists) that it would
          be either Tatsuko or O-tatsu, but not both.

          > I think in regards to the hat I'm going to have to bite the bullet
          > and order the biggest gasa hat I can find from Japan; I really like
          > the ichime gasa but it would have to be at 10 cm wider to be wider
          > than my shoulders!

          I hear that. Try the "Warring States" page here:
          http://www.shop-japan.co.jp/english-boku/index.html

          > Another question I have is about footwear. I have a very nice pair of
          > lacquered geta; according to a kimono book I have geta are more casual
          > and zori (the flat ones) are more formal. Is this true in the medieval
          > time period as well, or just now?

          A caveat about modern kimono references - they're modern. ;-> If you
          want to know what people wear in period, look at artwork or if you're
          lucky surviving examples from the period you're researching.

          Geta are foul weather gear, specifically designed for walking in mud,
          hence the ha (stilts). They would also be worn to and from the baths.
          The bath-house connection is why they're matched with yukata (cotton
          bathrobes) for casual wear in the modern context, usually for summer
          festivals.

          Period zori look nothing like the vinyl wedgie things sold these days
          for women as dress shoes. They would have been made of rice straw and
          look like this:
          http://web-japan.org/nipponia/nipponia21/images/topic/25_5.jpg

          You can sometimes find them as billed as waraji zori. A reasonable
          alternative are setta or tatami zori.

          As for sizing, they should be what you'd think is too small for you.
          If your heel dangles off the back by a couple of cm, that's about
          right. More than that will be uncomfortable, less may have you getting
          your hems caught in your zori (or geta).

          Saionji no Hanae
          West Kingdom
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