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Re: [SCA-JML] Japanese name questions

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  • Joshua Badgley
    ... Okay, that answered the main issue of my question. ... I think I was seeing evidence of the non-interchangeable characters along with interchangeable
    Message 1 of 60 , Nov 2, 2000
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      On Thu, 2 Nov 2000, Barbara Nostrand wrote:

      > Noble Cousin!
      >
      > The kanji were not interchangeable. Some appear at the beginning, some

      Okay, that answered the main issue of my question.

      > >At the same time, Ko-, O-, and the like often seem to come at the
      > >beginning of a name, and I can't think of them coming at the end, off the
      > >top of my head.
      >
      > I'm not sure what you are talking about here. If you are talking
      > about women's name that is a complicated subject all by itself.
      > Further, there was a change in the naming pattern for women going
      > on at about the 16th century.

      I think I was seeing evidence of the non-interchangeable characters along
      with interchangeable characters and wasn't sure if one was an exception or
      not. I'm sorry if I am unclear, but I think I understand better now: for
      the most part I should probably look for something that is directly
      traceable to the period of Japan I am looking at, although I would like to
      learn more about this practice.

      > >Were there specific rules for this? Or should I simply take two kanji
      > >from names that I like and add them together. For instance, would any of
      > >the following be acceptable:
      > > Masayoshi
      > > Naohide
      > > Masahide
      > > Naoyoshi
      > > Yoshimasa
      >
      > They sound plausible since I can immediately identify likely underlying
      > jinmei kanji for them.
      >
      > Masayoshi dates from at least 1332.
      > Masahida dates from at least 1600.
      > Yoshimasa dates from at least 1332.
      >
      > I do not have citations from the two Nao- constructions. I have
      > citations for: Naoaki, Naoie, Naomitsu, Naomochi, Naonobu, Naosada,
      > Naoshige, Naotoki, Naotomo, Naotsune, Naouji, Naoyori, Naozane,
      > and Naozumi.

      There is also Naomasa and Naotaka in the Ii family (hence the thought of
      using it in a name). I was looking to find some sort of construction that
      would fit the apparent naming style of the Sengoku-jidai.

      > >PS: I'm thinking of Rintarou as a yobina/zokumyou and wonder if there are
      > >any comments on that?
      >
      > Why "Rin" ??? These prefixes are commonly associated with specific
      > uji or possibly han. I also believe that we can justify using totemic
      > animals as prefixes. All I can immediately think of from Rin is "forest"
      > and that just doesn't make sense to me. Of course, I might be missing
      > an association.

      I chose Rin because a) I liked the sound b) I liked the kanji and c) it
      was one of the prefixes mentioned in the book I was looking at.

      With animals, I assume one would use the on-yomi, like with 'Rin'.

      So some possible zokumyou might look like:
      Ryutarou
      Isaburou
      etc.

      The other ending I saw for zokumyou was titles, but I wasn't sure how
      those were used. Like -nosuke. Would anyone be able to have a name with
      a titular meaning?
      For example:
      Sannosuke
      Tazayemon
      Masanoshin
      Ryunosuke
      Rinsuke

      The problem with the book I have is it is telling how to read the names,
      and so I am not sure if it is leaving out what names wouldn't be
      encountered, since it is irrelevant to the purpose of the book.

      -Godric Logan
    • Barbara Nostrand
      Noble Cousins! I agree about the Yamanoue. Aside from its historical attestation, it follows a regular locative construction. As for Kemuri, while it is
      Message 60 of 60 , Nov 8, 2000
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        Noble Cousins!

        I agree about the Yamanoue. Aside from its historical attestation, it
        follows a regular locative construction. As for Kemuri, while it is
        impossible to prove that anything which follows the sound system for
        a language is NOT a name, Kemuri is in the class of things which are
        unlikely to be a name. For example, Quidich and Dumbledore are
        reasonable phonetic constructions, but I would be surprised to meet
        anyone over the age of five with either of those. Borrowing from
        English Onomastics, we pretty much know when the name Wendy was
        invented. No we can not prove that it was never ever used by anyone
        before its use in literature, but we have no reason to believe that
        it was. Similarly, we have no reason to believe that Kemuri was
        used as a Japanese name.

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar
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