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RE: [SCA-JML] Re: Geta

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  • Susan Campbell
    Paulownia wood is an excellent choice for geta. The following link has the mechanical properties and common uses of paulownia wood, and while geta aren t
    Message 1 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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      Paulownia wood is an excellent choice for geta. The following link has the mechanical properties and common uses of paulownia wood, and while geta aren't specifically listed, you can see that they and other handicrafts could come from the butt ends of other projects.

      http://idrinfo.idrc.ca/Archive/Corpdocs/071235/071235k.htm

      YIS,

      Mori Matsunomae



      Rick Howard <rhoward@...> wrote: Ohayo!

      Several pair that I have (all made in the 1900s, I think) are paulownia,
      photos taken in the 1800s depict paulownia blanks being prepared to be made
      into geta, and a several references (web and print) discuss paulownia as a
      common construction material for geta in period. The geta that I have are
      light in weight and show surprising little wear.

      Any other wood being commonly used that anyone knows about?

      Yoshi

      Akitsuki Yoshimitsu - Barony of Coeur d'Ennui, Kingdom of Calontir
      Wealth and rank are like the clouds; I do not wish for such transient
      things.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sca-jml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      James Eckman
      Sent: Tuesday, July 11, 2006 1:15 AM
      To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [SCA-JML] Re: Geta

      > Posted by: "wodeford" wodeford@... wodeford

      Cool links. What's the traditional wood used? SNIP

      I would not recommend pine if you wear socks, resin!!!

      Jim Eckman






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • wodeford
      ... Pawlonia, I believe. It s ludicrously light for its tensile strength. (I have a pawlonia tansu and moving it from the dealer s was like picking up a cheap
      Message 2 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, James Eckman <ronin_engineer@...> wrote:

        > Cool links. What's the traditional wood used?
        Pawlonia, I believe. It's ludicrously light for its tensile strength.
        (I have a pawlonia tansu and moving it from the dealer's was like
        picking up a cheap styrofoam cooler. I couldn't believe I was lifting
        furniture.)

        Saionji no Hanae, West Kingdom
      • Susan Campbell
        To purchase Paulownia wood, since Home Depot is unlikely to carry it, you may want to check here, http://www.worldpaulownia.com/html/paulownia_warehouse.html
        Message 3 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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          To purchase Paulownia wood, since Home Depot is unlikely to carry it, you may want to check here, http://www.worldpaulownia.com/html/paulownia_warehouse.html

          There are lots of places that do carry more exotic woods.

          Mori Matsunomae

          Rick Howard <rhoward@...> wrote: Ohayo!

          Several pair that I have (all made in the 1900s, I think) are paulownia,
          photos taken in the 1800s depict paulownia blanks being prepared to be made
          into geta, and a several references (web and print) discuss paulownia as a
          common construction material for geta in period. The geta that I have are
          light in weight and show surprising little wear.

          Any other wood being commonly used that anyone knows about?

          Yoshi

          Akitsuki Yoshimitsu - Barony of Coeur d'Ennui, Kingdom of Calontir
          Wealth and rank are like the clouds; I do not wish for such transient
          things.

          -----Original Message-----
          From: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sca-jml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          James Eckman
          Sent: Tuesday, July 11, 2006 1:15 AM
          To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [SCA-JML] Re: Geta

          > Posted by: "wodeford" wodeford@... wodeford

          Cool links. What's the traditional wood used? SNIP

          I would not recommend pine if you wear socks, resin!!!

          Jim Eckman






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Barbara Nostrand
          Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! The archaeological site in question has published findings. These should include estimated dates and stuff like that.
          Message 4 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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            Noble Cousins!

            Greetings from Solveig! The archaeological site in question has
            published findings. These should include estimated dates and stuff
            like that.

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar

            We have already published the excavation reports of the Kusado Sengen-
            cho site in five volumes. Each volume has an english summary. They
            have been collected in some university libraries in the U.S.A. Please
            refer to the libraries below. Harvard Yenching Library
            Harvard University
            2 Divinity Avenue
            Cambridge, Mass. 02138
            U.S.A.

             East Asian Library
            University of California
            Berkeley, California 94720
            U.S.A.

             Asia Library

            The University of Michigan
            University Library
            Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1205
            U.S.A.



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Elaine Koogler
            ... It may be difficult to find in this country as most of what is grown here is exported to Japan...it is an incredibly important wood to the Japanese,
            Message 5 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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              wodeford wrote:
              > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, James Eckman <ronin_engineer@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >> Cool links. What's the traditional wood used?
              >>
              > Pawlonia, I believe. It's ludicrously light for its tensile strength.
              > (I have a pawlonia tansu and moving it from the dealer's was like
              > picking up a cheap styrofoam cooler. I couldn't believe I was lifting
              > furniture.)
              >
              > Saionji no Hanae, West Kingdom
              >
              >
              >
              It may be difficult to find in this country as most of what is grown
              here is exported to Japan...it is an incredibly important wood to the
              Japanese, including serving as one of the mon for the Empress! The good
              news is that you can probably grown your own if you wish. If you
              "google "Empress Tree", you should be able to find several nurseries
              that carry them. I've got several growing in my yard!

              Kiri
            • rhoward@dwx.com
              Hai, I started typing up a bibliography before heading out to the office. Once done, I ll send it out. Yoshi Akitsuki Yoshimitsu - Barony of Coeur d Ennui,
              Message 6 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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                Hai, I started typing up a bibliography before heading out to the office. Once done, I'll send it
                out.

                Yoshi

                Akitsuki Yoshimitsu - Barony of Coeur d'Ennui, Kingdom of Calontir
                Wealth and rank are like the clouds; I do not wish for such transient things.

                ------- Original Message -------
                From : Barbara Nostrand[mailto:nostrand@...]
                Sent : 7/11/2006 8:47:24 AM
                To : sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                Cc :
                Subject : RE: Re: [SCA-JML] Re: Geta

                Noble Cousin!

                Greetings from Solveig!

                > Several pair that I have (all made in the 1900s, I think) are
                > paulownia,
                > photos taken in the 1800s depict paulownia blanks being prepared to
                > be made
                > into geta, and a several references (web and print) discuss
                > paulownia as a
                > common construction material for geta in period. The geta that I
                > have are
                > light in weight and show surprising little wear.

                Could you possibly share references?

                Your Humble Servant
                Solveig Throndardottir
                Amateur Scholar




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              • wodeford
                ... It s that whole having a yard to grow it in thing, though. Saionji no Hanae, apartment dweller.
                Message 7 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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                  --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Elaine Koogler <ekoogler1@...> wrote:
                  > The good news is that you can probably grown your own if you wish.

                  It's that whole having a yard to grow it in thing, though.

                  Saionji no Hanae, apartment dweller.
                • Susan Campbell
                  Hmmm, my earlier replies may not have gone through. 1. This link is to the structure of paulownia wood. It is ideal for construction of furniture and geta.
                  Message 8 of 23 , Jul 11, 2006
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                    Hmmm, my earlier replies may not have gone through.

                    1. This link is to the structure of paulownia wood. It is ideal for construction of furniture and geta. http://idrinfo.idrc.ca/Archive/Corpdocs/071235/071235k.htm

                    2. Paulonia wood is sold in this country. It seems to be grown mostly in Georgia, but here is the one source that I found. The prices seem pretty reasonable. http://www.worldpaulownia.com/html/paulownia_warehouse.html

                    I hope that these were of interest.

                    YIS,

                    Mori Matsunoma

                    Elaine Koogler <ekoogler1@...> wrote: wodeford wrote:
                    > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, James Eckman <ronin_engineer@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >> Cool links. What's the traditional wood used?
                    >>
                    > Pawlonia, I believe. It's ludicrously light for its tensile strength.
                    > (I have a pawlonia tansu and moving it from the dealer's was like
                    > picking up a cheap styrofoam cooler. I couldn't believe I was lifting
                    > furniture.)
                    >
                    > Saionji no Hanae, West Kingdom
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    It may be difficult to find in this country as most of what is grown
                    here is exported to Japan...it is an incredibly important wood to the
                    Japanese, including serving as one of the mon for the Empress! The good
                    news is that you can probably grown your own if you wish. If you
                    "google "Empress Tree", you should be able to find several nurseries
                    that carry them. I've got several growing in my yard!

                    Kiri





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Carey G
                    I sent this earlier and it hasn t showed up on the list yet so if it shows up twice I apologize. I was wondering if anyone had any references or images for the
                    Message 9 of 23 , Apr 27, 2012
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                      I sent this earlier and it hasn't showed up on the list yet so if it shows up twice I apologize.

                      I was wondering if anyone had any references or images for the type of geta with the two pieces that elevate the shoe off the ground? An example of what I'm talking about can be seen here http://www.photography-match.com/wallpapers/4866_geta/ I am trying to have at least a little bit of documentation for each of my accessories.
                      Thanks
                      Agnes
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