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Making waraji - heel loops?

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  • tupan4
    I ve finally started messing around making waraji, and I have a question about finishing them. I m using the handout in the files section, which I think is the
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 5, 2006
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      I've finally started messing around making waraji, and I have a
      question about finishing them.

      I'm using the handout in the files section, which I think is the same
      thing Ii used in his Pennsic class a few years ago, and it says to
      pull the back loops in tight at the end. (These are the loops you
      hook around your toes and the ropes form the sole of the sandal.) But
      when I look at photos of (modern) waraji that are not on feet, they
      seem to come with two loops at the back as if you hadn't pulled those
      structural ropes through. It also looks like these heel loops come in
      handy for lacing the sandal around your ankle. So where do they come
      from, and if they are the structural ropes, how do you tighten down
      the straw and keep it from unraveling at the back?

      I've seen some examples where there's a small string binding at the
      bottom of the loops (at the shoe sole). So I tried doing that and
      pulling the structural strings against the sandal but not all the way
      in. It looks pretty close to the photos, but I don't know how sturdy
      it will be. I tried fastening the small string by weaving it through
      the sole and using a hangman's knot on the other end.

      One more thing, is there any way to predict how much rope to start
      with? I've been guessing, and ending up slightly short.

      Thanks!

      ERIN
    • Rick Johnson
      I think that there were different styles of waraji depending on how you wanted to tie them to your feet. So I didn t worry about these loops and added them as
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 5, 2006
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        I think that there were different styles of waraji depending on how
        you wanted to tie them to your feet. So I didn't worry about these
        loops and added them as I felt they were needed. Running in zori's
        is a pain but builds strong toes<g> to prevent your zori's from flying
        away.

        I finished mine by simply weaving the last 6" or so back along
        whatever place they would fit and let the natural play hold them in
        place.

        I think the only way to determine rope length is to but 100', make
        your waraji then measure whatever is left over.

        It does help if you make your form to your size first and keep that
        for future use when you make your next set.


        Rick Johnson, PO Box 40451, Tucson, Az. 85717
        http://www.geocities.com/DesertHenge
        http://www.geocities.com/RikJohnson_ERB
        http://www.geocities.com/RikJohnson_RLJ


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      • Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.)
        ... There were different types of waraji (probably a different type made in every village). I ve been experimenting with several things. 1) Create a small
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 5, 2006
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          On 7/5/06, Rick Johnson <rikjohnson@...> wrote:
          >
          > I think that there were different styles of waraji depending on how
          > you wanted to tie them to your feet. So I didn't worry about these
          > loops and added them as I felt they were needed. Running in zori's
          > is a pain but builds strong toes<g> to prevent your zori's from flying
          > away.
          >
          There were different types of waraji (probably a different type made
          in every village). I've been experimenting with several things.

          1) Create a small circle of straw and 'catch' this in the back two
          loops when you are finished.

          2) Weave the two loops in back together and pull it tight. You may
          even want to put something in between the loops so that it keeps it
          from pulling to tight (but this should be done by the way the loops
          are woven). This is something I've see in dissassembled waraji, but
          I'm still not sure I could duplicate it well.

          -Ii
        • Andrew Benton
          I am allergic to learning new skills, and have tremendous amounts of money. OK, I made both of those up. But if one lived in Austin, and one was disinclined to
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 6, 2006
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            I am allergic to learning new skills, and have tremendous amounts of
            money. OK, I made both of those up. But if one lived in Austin, and
            one was disinclined to make one's own waraji, where might one purchase
            them? Are there locals who make them?

            Respectfully,

            Kamaitachi no Kansuke
          • Barbara Nostrand
            Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! Yes, and you see regional variations in hay bales also. Your Humble Servant Solveig Throndardottir Amateur Scholar
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 6, 2006
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              Noble Cousins!

              Greetings from Solveig! Yes, and you see regional variations in hay
              bales also.

              Your Humble Servant
              Solveig Throndardottir
              Amateur Scholar
            • Rick Johnson
              I am the opposite in that I love learning new skills and being Air Force retired, have no wealth to speak of. But I was willing to purchase them and found a
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 6, 2006
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                I am the opposite in that I love learning new skills and being Air
                Force retired, have no wealth to speak of.
                But I was willing to purchase them and found a number of internet
                sites where they could be found at around $15-$25 a pair.
                The fact that I found that the life-span of the waraji is measured in
                a few miles or days is what convinced me to make my own.
                Why spend that much for something that would last only one event?

                Mo wonder the travelers along the Taikaido would give their worn
                sandlas to the poor for fire-tender as they walked.


                Rick Johnson, PO Box 40451, Tucson, Az. 85717
                http://www.geocities.com/DesertHenge
                http://www.geocities.com/RikJohnson_ERB
                http://www.geocities.com/RikJohnson_RLJ


                Please note: message attached




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