Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SCA-JML] Re: Kamakura Monk

Expand Messages
  • JESSICA DODGE
    On point Number 1 that isn t to say that that Torii gates are just for Inari... That is correct. The gates mark the enterance to the sacred space. Thay are
    Message 1 of 31 , Jul 1, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      On point Number 1
      "that isn't to say that that Torii gates are just for Inari..."

      That is correct. The gates mark the enterance to the sacred space. Thay are RED becuase in Feng Shui, red is a neutral color, and it does not interfere with the Chi flow of the space. ( I probley spelled Chi wrong)
      Hotaru

      "Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.)" <tatsushu@...> wrote:
      On 6/30/06, JESSICA DODGE <kaythiarain@...> wrote:

      > okay,
      > Working around the issue of making the shrine FOR foxes, instead make the shrine to the Rice-god Inari.
      >
      > Inari's servants are foxes, and a is thought to take the guise of a fox. Also, in one of my Books, (that is currently packed) says that Inari, later came to cover grain type crops, which covers corn.
      > So that Lillies is in Missouri, and the surrounding area has corn fields, it wouldn't be unusal to put up a shrine to him. That would be a great indirect way to put up a shrine to foxes. IF you wanted a proper recreation.

      Inari shrines are also useful for several reasons:

      1) They are EVERYWHERE. I have yet to see a shrine in Japan that
      didn't have an ancillary shrine to Inari. They are very distinctive,
      with the (usually red) torii gates (usually several of them, lined up
      like a short hallway). This isn't to say that torii gates are just
      for Inari--but the small red ones are usually indicative of that.

      2) They are related to the harvest, as mentioned, so the place would
      make sense. Specifically of rice, and since corn is also a grain
      (okay, that might be stretching it... but there is no corn in Japan
      [natively] so it just might work...)

      3) They are definitely within our period of study.

      Here are some recommended sites about Fushimi Inari Taisha, the chief
      shrine of Inari:

      http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e3915.html (this has some good links
      about other shrines and shrine goodies)

      http://inari.jp/ (In Japanese, but wonderful pictures of Inari Taisha
      in Fushimi [and great info if you can read Japanese]. I especially
      like the 'Animeshon' link at the bottom that tells stories about Inari
      Taisha, which appears to have been founded in 711 CE. Good music,
      too).

      -Ii





      ---------------------------------
      Do you Yahoo!?
      Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail Beta.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Park McKellop
      Chinese, I believe. Alcyoneus Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.) wrote: ... For particular martial arts instructors? I ve never seen this
      Message 31 of 31 , Jul 2, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Chinese, I believe.

        Alcyoneus

        "Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.)" <tatsushu@...> wrote:
        On 7/2/06, Park McKellop <squire009@...> wrote:
        >
        > Red was also the traditional color for the door for martial arts instructors.
        >
        > Alcyoneus
        >

        For particular martial arts instructors? I've never seen this
        particular tradition before--or is it a Chinese tradition?

        -Ii





        ---------------------------------
        Do you Yahoo!?
        Next-gen email? Have it all with the all-new Yahoo! Mail Beta.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.