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Re: [SCA-JML] Japanese name questions

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  • Joshua Badgley
    Thank you for your answer, it was quite enlightening. I m still scratching my head over the nanori, a bit. There seem to be about 200 commonly used kanji in
    Message 1 of 60 , Nov 1, 2000
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      Thank you for your answer, it was quite enlightening.

      I'm still scratching my head over the nanori, a bit. There seem to be
      about 200 commonly used kanji in the nanori, or so I have read. Were
      these kanji interchangeable, or were there rules to it? Is there any
      indication of prefered methods of naming?

      For example, we look late in the 16th Century and see Toyotomi is named
      Hideyoshii, and his son is Hideyori. Tokugawa Ieyasu's grandson is named
      Mitsuhide, however. There are names like Kiyomasa, Naomasa, and Masamune,
      as well as Yoshinobu, Nobunaga, Nobutsuna.

      At the same time, Ko-, O-, and the like often seem to come at the
      beginning of a name, and I can't think of them coming at the end, off the
      top of my head.

      Were there specific rules for this? Or should I simply take two kanji
      from names that I like and add them together. For instance, would any of
      the following be acceptable:
      Masayoshi
      Naohide
      Masahide
      Naoyoshi
      Yoshimasa

      Is it a matter of putting the kanji together, or is it something where
      someone just has to 'know' in order to do it properly, and so the best
      thing for someone today would be to take a name that we can obviously
      trace back to a single individual as proof it was used?

      -Godric Logan/Ii ???? ????

      PS: I'm thinking of Rintarou as a yobina/zokumyou and wonder if there are
      any comments on that?
    • Barbara Nostrand
      Noble Cousins! I agree about the Yamanoue. Aside from its historical attestation, it follows a regular locative construction. As for Kemuri, while it is
      Message 60 of 60 , Nov 8, 2000
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        Noble Cousins!

        I agree about the Yamanoue. Aside from its historical attestation, it
        follows a regular locative construction. As for Kemuri, while it is
        impossible to prove that anything which follows the sound system for
        a language is NOT a name, Kemuri is in the class of things which are
        unlikely to be a name. For example, Quidich and Dumbledore are
        reasonable phonetic constructions, but I would be surprised to meet
        anyone over the age of five with either of those. Borrowing from
        English Onomastics, we pretty much know when the name Wendy was
        invented. No we can not prove that it was never ever used by anyone
        before its use in literature, but we have no reason to believe that
        it was. Similarly, we have no reason to believe that Kemuri was
        used as a Japanese name.

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar
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