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Re: [SCA-JML] Re: non-ronin???

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  • Susan Campbell
    I ve always interpreted that particular scene it as a respect for the dead. The arms and armor are highly personal accoutrements, as fine kimono are for
    Message 1 of 28 , Jun 20, 2006
      I've always interpreted that particular scene it as a respect for the dead. The arms and armor are highly personal accoutrements, as fine kimono are for women. Things that are well cared for, worn often, and are designed to keep you alive, might be seen to have absorbed some of the essence and energy of the original owner. Wearing such armor would replace that essence with your own, and wiping out the last real remnant of the original owner.

      Swords were seen to be the soul of the samurai and an extension themselves. I imagine the other arms and armor would be regarded in a similar vein.

      Mori Matsunomae


      "Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.)" <tatsushu@...> wrote: On 6/20/06, Barbara Nostrand <nostrand@...> wrote:
      > > If I may, they are probably more angry about the equipment being
      > > taken from DEAD samurai rather than defeated samurai, the Japanese
      > > having strong taboos against touching the dead.
      >
      > Death like blood conveys ritual uncleanness. They may be angry at
      > being employed by people who are contaminated. They may also be angry
      > about being offered contaminated equipment. The reality of course was
      > that stuff filtered back onto the market.
      >
      In the end, however, I think that battleground scavenging is just
      considered a distasteful (even 'evil') occupation. There would be
      wounded who would probably be killed for their equipment, or even
      'hunted' (someone wounded enough to move, but not in good enough
      health to defend himself against a mob of peasants who realize nobody
      will miss him and they can sell his arms and armour for a good price).
      You are seen as grave-robbing murderers, essentially. Even though it
      may be a necessary black market, that doesn't mean that the samurai
      have to like it (and they are supposed to represent the 'chivalric'
      ideal of samurai, as opposed to the bandit samurai, who are more
      concerned with their own well-being, preying on those who are less
      eqiupped for battle than they are).

      It was also just a great moment to show the samurai up on their high
      horse, as it was, concerned more about what is 'proper' than trying to
      eke out a living day to day, and a good way to show a clash of the
      different class systems of the day.

      -Ii





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