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Re: [SCA-JML] Digest Number 2132

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  • Leah Lloyd
    This all got started because someone was asking about women wearing hakama during the Heian period. People were for one reason or another failing to notice
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 13, 2006
      This all got started because someone was asking about women wearing
      hakama during the Heian period. People were for one reason or another
      failing to notice that these women were wearing two pairs of hakama
      with different lengths. As for terminology, i learned rather a long
      time ago that finding the correct period term for things can greatly
      aid research.

      Your Humble Servant
      Solveig Throndardottir
      Amateur Scholar

      The example that you gave was for an unmarried underage girl. Do you have any examples available of the 2 layers for married adult women?
      Danabren/Kuro Kamkiri

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    • Barbara Nostrand
      Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... Unfortunately, the Costume Museum does not have an example of a formally dressed adult married woman for the period
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 13, 2006
        Noble Cousin!

        Greetings from Solveig!
        >
        > The example that you gave was for an unmarried underage girl. Do
        > you have any examples available of the 2 layers for married adult
        > women?
        > Danabren/Kuro Kamkiri
        Unfortunately, the Costume Museum does not have an example of a
        formally dressed adult married woman for the period in question.
        Also, again rather unfortunately, the descriptions provided by the
        Costume Museum are not always very well written. For example,
        checking in with Daijirin and Kodansha Kogojiten we find that a
        "kazami" is actually a formal outer-robe worn during the Heian period
        by young kuge women, women attached to shrines, female officials, &c.
        Regardless, the costume itself appears to be appropriate for court
        ladies of the period. If you prefer to be sequestered somewhere
        outside of court, then you can wear something less formal.

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • wodeford
        ... Perhaps I m unclear on what you mean by the period in question. Is the kazami something relatively early? I just ran the KCM s explanation through Google
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 13, 2006
          --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Barbara Nostrand <nostrand@...> wrote:
          > Unfortunately, the Costume Museum does not have an example of a
          > formally dressed adult married woman for the period in question.

          Perhaps I'm unclear on what you mean by the period in question. Is the
          kazami something relatively early?

          I just ran the KCM's explanation through Google Translate for this
          outfit http://www.iz2.or.jp/fukusyoku/wayou/19.htm and got this:
          "Full dress of the wife of the court noble the China robe, is to
          attach the 裳, but, apply to this full dress with the noble people,
          there was a thing which can repeat the small 袿 on the single, five
          robes.  The modern times small 袿 袿 with with isomorphism, in 陪
          (the medium [be]) with has influence of the triple tailoring which
          attaches another fissure which is said between the [me] [ri] of the
          frontal land and the lining, but, with peaceful final period it does
          necessary and not only this, after all the total length is thought as
          some short ones. You can call this associate full dress of the woman."

          I'm going to guess that "peaceful final period" refers to the latter
          end of the Heian period.

          This description of the informal winter outfit shown at
          http://www.iz2.or.jp/fukusyoku/wayou/21.htm appears to offer a "clue"
          on how to tell whether a woman is married, namely the shorter side
          locks of hair:
          "Normal form of wife of court noble. The 袿 you repeat single on, the
          hitting hakama of crimson are and attach the wadded silk garment of
          white under.  With those of the winter, two 陪 weavings, single the
          happiness water caltrop sentence (occasion the [wa] it does this to
          harass the 袿, it is) also times when the area twill (the one [ji]
          leash), as for the 袿 the several you pile up hard there are.  衵
          (The [a] to include) with the fan in the hand, the short hair where as
          for the hair with the perpendicular hair, the sidelock judging which
          is the mark of the married state and engagement (the bottle [so] [gi])
          with you say is dropped on side of the cheek. "

          Saionji no Hanae
          West
        • Barbara Nostrand
          Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... You guessed correctly. What it said in Japanese was Heian Makki (End of the Heian period). ... You are again correct.
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 14, 2006
            Noble Cousin!

            Greetings from Solveig!
            > I'm going to guess that "peaceful final period" refers to the latter
            > end of the Heian period.
            You guessed correctly. What it said in Japanese was Heian Makki (End
            of the Heian period).

            > This description of the informal winter outfit shown at
            > http://www.iz2.or.jp/fukusyoku/wayou/21.htm appears to offer a "clue"
            > on how to tell whether a woman is married, namely the shorter side
            > locks of hair
            You are again correct. In fact a tradition of women cutting their
            hair in connection with getting married persisted up into the late
            twentieth century.

            There are a number of other interesting Heian customs such as the
            "sash" given to a pregnant woman by the presumed father indicating
            the legitimacy of the forthcoming child. This persisted well into the
            Kamakura period as attested by the Confessions of Lady Nijo.

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar
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