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Re: [SCA-JML] yari question

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  • Jeff Hawkins
    swordforum.com Run a search on yari. http://home.earthlink.net/~steinrl/polearms.htm I also have instructions for authentic mounting and pictures of yari if
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 4 6:06 PM
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      swordforum.com Run a search on yari.

      http://home.earthlink.net/~steinrl/polearms.htm

      I also have instructions for authentic mounting and pictures of yari if you're interested.

      Jeffery H.

      Rick Johnson <rikjohnson@...> wrote:
      I like spears.
      They combine the staff and knife plus they keep your enemy at a respectful distance so when I hike I carry a Cold Steel Bushman knife/spearhead in my backpack.

      I also have a couple home-made yaris, one from a bayonet that I welded a snife and hook to resemble some of the stranger designs (totally unweildy and useless for nothing more than pulling someone off a horse) plus I made a 2-ended S-sai which was unworkable as a martial arts weapon but when tied to a 10' pole, looks impressive (again, useless for anything other then keeping someone away from you or pulling them towards you).

      BUT,last weekend I found a Yari spearhead at a swap-meet. They guy wanted $5, we settled for $3 because it was a bit rusty and dull.

      Now this isn't an antique but a modern (probably 25-50 years old before Pakistan and China discovered that stupid American will buy anything) repro but unlike the wall-hangers you find at Bud-K, this was made from really good steel as good as any military bayonet I was issued in the Air Force. A very good parctical weapon I'd not hesitate to take into the field. The guy I bought it from said he was planning to hilt it to make a dagger it was such good steel.

      Ok, I cleaned it up, put a bit of an edge on it (don't need a razor-edge on a stabbing weapon) and went looking for a haft.

      It isn't easy to find decent wood suitable for a spear in Tucson. Not even the exotic hard-wood stores sell them.

      So I did get a couple shafts and spliced them together to make a 10' shaft for the yari. I can do that since I was a construction engineer with the Air Force (which explains all my exotic weapons made at the taxpayers time and expense<g>) so I know howmto splice wood and retain strength.


      Now here is my question...

      I am used to carrying a 6' shaft + blade spear mainly because I am used to a 6' bo.

      Since all the iullustrations I see show the Yary from 6-12' or so, I think the length is dependant on the persons desire and needs.

      So what length spear do you all prefer to carry?

      Obviously, too long and it cannot be stored in my house. Too short and it looks like a toy and I had to replace my 5' naginata staff with a 6' one for exactly that reason.

      So for those who like the spear, what is your preferred length and why?


      Rick Johnson, PO Box 40451, Tucson, Az. 85717
      http://www.geocities.com/DesertHenge
      http://www.geocities.com/RikJohnson_ERB
      http://www.geocities.com/RikJohnson_RLJ



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    • Susan Campbell
      When I mounted a glaive head, I purchased a hot mop handle. These are typically ash or hickory handles used for those people who apply tar to rooftops. The
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 5 5:20 AM
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        When I mounted a glaive head, I purchased a hot mop handle. These are typically ash or hickory handles used for those people who apply tar to rooftops. The place I bought it from online is no longer there. But that is the industry to check.

        http://acmehardware.com/product_detail.aspx?sku=4433306

        72 inches will give you enough length to modify as you see fit.

        Mori Matsunomae

        Rick Johnson <rikjohnson@...> wrote: I like spears.
        They combine the staff and knife plus they keep your enemy at a respectful distance so when I hike I carry a Cold Steel Bushman knife/spearhead in my backpack.

        I also have a couple home-made yaris, one from a bayonet that I welded a snife and hook to resemble some of the stranger designs (totally unweildy and useless for nothing more than pulling someone off a horse) plus I made a 2-ended S-sai which was unworkable as a martial arts weapon but when tied to a 10' pole, looks impressive (again, useless for anything other then keeping someone away from you or pulling them towards you).

        BUT,last weekend I found a Yari spearhead at a swap-meet. They guy wanted $5, we settled for $3 because it was a bit rusty and dull.

        Now this isn't an antique but a modern (probably 25-50 years old before Pakistan and China discovered that stupid American will buy anything) repro but unlike the wall-hangers you find at Bud-K, this was made from really good steel as good as any military bayonet I was issued in the Air Force. A very good parctical weapon I'd not hesitate to take into the field. The guy I bought it from said he was planning to hilt it to make a dagger it was such good steel.

        Ok, I cleaned it up, put a bit of an edge on it (don't need a razor-edge on a stabbing weapon) and went looking for a haft.

        It isn't easy to find decent wood suitable for a spear in Tucson. Not even the exotic hard-wood stores sell them.

        So I did get a couple shafts and spliced them together to make a 10' shaft for the yari. I can do that since I was a construction engineer with the Air Force (which explains all my exotic weapons made at the taxpayers time and expense<g>) so I know howmto splice wood and retain strength.


        Now here is my question...

        I am used to carrying a 6' shaft + blade spear mainly because I am used to a 6' bo.

        Since all the iullustrations I see show the Yary from 6-12' or so, I think the length is dependant on the persons desire and needs.

        So what length spear do you all prefer to carry?

        Obviously, too long and it cannot be stored in my house. Too short and it looks like a toy and I had to replace my 5' naginata staff with a 6' one for exactly that reason.

        So for those who like the spear, what is your preferred length and why?


        Rick Johnson, PO Box 40451, Tucson, Az. 85717
        http://www.geocities.com/DesertHenge
        http://www.geocities.com/RikJohnson_ERB
        http://www.geocities.com/RikJohnson_RLJ



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      • James Eckman
        ... Hey look Joe, this can opener fits on the end of a rifle! (Bill Mauldin cartoon) If I was going someplace that I thought was dangerous, I d take a long arm
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 5 6:58 AM
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          > From: "sigrune@..." sigrune@...
          >Subject: Re: yari question
          >
          >
          >Rick Johnson <rikjohnson@...> writes:
          >
          >
          >
          >>...this was made from really good steel as good as any military bayonet
          >>
          >>
          >The majority bayonets are made from so-so steel, U.S. bayonets in particular are fairly crappy as knife steels go. (Keep in mind they are made by the lowest bidder, and the milspec on a bayonet is a joke) They are not designed to take or hold a keen edge, they are more concerned with how they attach, how corrosion resistant they are, and if they will crack if used to pry open an ammo box. A pointed crowbar is a close compairision.
          >
          >
          Hey look Joe, this can opener fits on the end of a rifle! (Bill Mauldin
          cartoon)

          If I was going someplace that I thought was dangerous, I'd take a long
          arm or pistol though... a spear is way too sporting.

          Jim
        • Rick Johnson
          ... I m always interested and would like to see the info. I have the link you gave already printed and am a Sword-forum subscriber too. Just watched Cushingara
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 5 7:52 AM
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            >>I also have instructions for authentic mounting and pictures of yari if you're interested.
            >>Jeffery H.

            I'm always interested and would like to see the info.
            I have the link you gave already printed and am a Sword-forum subscriber too.


            Just watched Cushingara yesterday and really, Toshiro Mifune sucks with the spear in that film.



            Rick Johnson, PO Box 40451, Tucson, Az. 85717
            http://www.geocities.com/DesertHenge
            http://www.geocities.com/RikJohnson_ERB
            http://www.geocities.com/RikJohnson_RLJ


            Please note: message attached




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          • Jeff Hawkins
            Was given these instructions by a very nice fellow on swordforum.com. These instructions are his, not mine and I take no credit for them. Hold the shaft
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 5 12:42 PM
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              Was given these instructions by a very nice fellow on swordforum.com. These instructions are his, not mine and I take no credit for them.


              Hold the shaft against the tang and mark the tang length all around the shaft.

              Split the shaft in 4 to about 3 inches more than the length of the tang. Make sure the split is accurate (ie the cuts make a good 90 degree angle, are straight and cross as precisely in the centreline of the shaft as you can) and use a saw with as fine a kerf as possible - I used a Japanese pull-saw.

              Use a fine cut file to ever so slightly round the angles on the long edges of the tang - you want to make sure that there are no tool marks hiding in those edges that will bind up on your socket in the later stages of the process. The tang stays rectangular in cross section, you just radius the corners of that rectangle slightly. You'll still need a mallet to get it out of the socket but you wont need to beat so hard. Wrap every part of the blade other than the tang in masking tape - you're going to be handling it a lot and dont want to leave corroded fingerprints. It also makes you a little less likely to cut yourself on the edges.

              ok, back to the shaft... Shove chopsticks or other pieces of scrap wood into the cuts you made to spread apart the split pieces. You want to be able to get a fine knife (carvers chipping knife, for example) onto a single piece of it at least as far down as the length of the tang. If it wont spread that far without risking splitting the shaft, extend your cuts another inch and try again.

              From this point on, never stop reminding yourself that the cuts you made will be pointing to the corner edges of the tang, not towards its faces... Also from here on when I talk about pieces of the shaft I'm referring to the split sections.

              Pick a piece of the shaft as the top and mark it. At the end of the piece mark half the depth of the tang out from the centerline and where you marked the tang length, mark half the depth of the tang at its end. Repeat on the bottom piece. Do likewise for the left and right pieces, marking half the width of the tang.

              With the fine knife I mentioned earlier shave the "points" back to your marks in a straight line along the length of the pieces. remove your chopsticks or wedges, bind the pieces back together with string and check for fit. Rinse, lather and repeat until you have a snug fit. If you overdo it and end up with a loose fit, chuck that shaft and start over.

              Now take ordinary wood glue - not a polyurethane at this point because you want something that isnt going to stick to metal very well and coat the split surfaces generously with it. Stick a couple of rubber bands around it to hold it loosely and fit the blade. With the blade in place bind that sucker as tight as you can with strong twine. Let the glue set and then remove the string. Save yourself some time by marking the outline of the base of the blade on the business end of the shaft now.

              Tap lightly with a hammer along the length of the tang to loosen any glue that squeezed out internally and stuck your blade to the shaft (this WILL have happened) then clamp the shaft down to your workbench, clamp some scrap wood around the blade and tap this scrap gently with a mallet until the blade is free. Work a gentle taper from where you split the shaft to its tip such that the wood at the tip is flush with the base of the blade. This would also be a good time to decide where you are going to drill the holes in the tang and get that done, because that decision changes how you arrange the next bit.

              Reinforce the shaft from the tip all the way back to about the length of the tang. I used a mixture of iron wire wrapping and sections of same' wrap. Both were lacquered over. Gluing down a rattan wrap works too. Obviously you dont want to use a reinforcement method that you cant easily drill a hole through over the areas where you have holes in the tang.

              Cut a thin piece of leather to fit over the tang, fit the blade to the shaft and trim the leather to be flush with shaft and blade. This will absorb some shock from the blade and make the end-grain of the shaft less likely to get damaged. Glue your little leather "seppa" to the end of the shaft.

              Measure, drill and taper your peg holes in the shaft. Now all you need to do is mount the ishizuki, make a saya and finish the piece however you like...

              Rick Howard <rhoward@...> wrote:
              Good morning,

              I would be interested in this information, if you are willing to share.

              Regards,
              Yoshi

              -----Original Message-----
              From: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sca-jml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
              Jeff Hawkins
              Sent: Sunday, June 04, 2006 8:07 PM
              To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] yari question



              I also have instructions for authentic mounting and pictures of yari if
              you're interested.

              Jeffery H.





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            • Barbara Nostrand
              Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... I don t recall that one so well at the moment. However, there is a fun spear sequence in Hidden Fortress. Your Humble
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 5 12:57 PM
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                Noble Cousin!

                Greetings from Solveig!

                > Just watched Cushingara yesterday and really, Toshiro Mifune sucks
                > with the spear in that film.

                I don't recall that one so well at the moment. However, there is a
                fun spear sequence in Hidden Fortress.

                Your Humble Servant
                Solveig Throndardottir
                Amateur Scholar



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Rick Johnson
                Rick Johnson, PO Box 40451, Tucson, Az. 85717 http://www.geocities.com/DesertHenge http://www.geocities.com/RikJohnson_ERB
                Message 7 of 9 , Jun 5 4:48 PM
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                  Rick Johnson, PO Box 40451, Tucson, Az. 85717
                  http://www.geocities.com/DesertHenge
                  http://www.geocities.com/RikJohnson_ERB
                  http://www.geocities.com/RikJohnson_RLJ


                  Please note: message attached




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