Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SCA-JML] Paper folding for VERY personal adornment (Am I Period or Not?)

Expand Messages
  • Solveig Throndardottir
    Ii dono! Greetings from Solveig! ... Not only does kokigami not appear in four kogojiten that I consulted, it does not appear in Daijirin either. Neither
    Message 1 of 15 , Dec 2, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Ii dono!

      Greetings from Solveig!

      > I believe the question was whether or not 'Kokigami' can actually be
      > found
      > referenced in the Kojiki.

      Not only does "kokigami" not appear in four kogojiten that I consulted,
      it does not appear in Daijirin either. Neither does kookigami nor
      koukigami. So what exactly are people trying to look up?

      Your Humble Servant
      Solveig Throndardottir
      Amateur Scholar

      +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
      | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS, Fleur |
      | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
      | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:Solveig@... |
      +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
      | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
      | the trash by my email filters. |
      +----------------------------------------------------------------------+


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Solveig Throndardottir
      Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! There is a Kouki in the Nihongi and the Kojiki, but this refers to the establishment of the imperial line by Jinmu
      Message 2 of 15 , Dec 2, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Noble Cousins!

        Greetings from Solveig! There is a "Kouki" in the Nihongi and the
        Kojiki, but this refers to the establishment of the imperial line by
        Jinmu Tennou. Unless Daijirin is more prudish than I think it is,
        Similarly, Kogorin does not appear to have heard of them. I suspect
        that his is at least in part something that someone made up to
        entertain North Americans. Does someone have an actual quote from the
        Kojiki? I believe that there may be an online version of the Kojiki at
        the University of Virginia Japanese Text Project.

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar

        +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
        | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS, Fleur |
        | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
        | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:Solveig@... |
        +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
        | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
        | the trash by my email filters. |
        +----------------------------------------------------------------------+


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • wodeford
        ... how to make ... Round cord (as opposed to the flat cord for the sleeves). Go to a store that stocks sewing and upholstery supplies. I bought plain white
        Message 3 of 15 , Dec 2, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.)"
          <tatsushu@g...> wrote:

          > > Also, does anyone have suggestions on what materials to use and
          how to make
          > > the decorative knots over the seams on the upper part of the hitatare?

          Round cord (as opposed to the flat cord for the sleeves). Go to a
          store that stocks sewing and upholstery supplies. I bought plain white
          flat cord and round cord (drapery cord!) made of cotton for my "boy
          clothes."

          Here's a very nice detail photo showing the shapes of the figure-8
          knots, as well as the collar ties and sleeve ties - this is a modern
          hitatare with slits rather than the "belt loops" sewn into the sleeves.

          http://www.yusoku.com/hitatare-asa.jpg

          Saionji
        • Park McKellop
          I wasn t questioning the legitimacy of the Kojiki, so much as whether the kokigami was legit, and whether the quote a)existed, and b)referred to kokigami.
          Message 4 of 15 , Dec 2, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            I wasn't questioning the legitimacy of the Kojiki, so much as whether the kokigami was legit, and whether the quote a)existed, and b)referred to kokigami.

            Alcyoneus

            Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...> wrote:
            Noble Cousin!

            Greetings from Solveig! While the Nihongi and the Kojiki have largely
            the same content, the Nihongi is generally considered to be
            "historical" while the Kojiki is generally considered to be
            "religious". Regardless, both are "ligit" in the sense that neither of
            them are supposed to be satirical.

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar




            ---------------------------------
            Yahoo! Personals
            Single? There's someone we'd like you to meet.
            Lots of someones, actually. Yahoo! Personals

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Tim McShane
            Thanks to everyone who supplied such helpful responses! - Shiro [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 15 , Dec 5, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              Thanks to everyone who supplied such helpful responses!

              - Shiro

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Sean Malloy
              ... That method of whipping works, but it s hard to get tight. The way I learned -- and which you can find in _Ashley s Book of Knots_ is to make a long,
              Message 6 of 15 , Dec 6, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.)"
                <tatsushu@g...> wrote:
                > 2) Tie a small piece of thread around the end. Basically wrap the end
                > tightly for a centimeter or so, and then pull the ends together. It's
                > called 'whipping', and you can see it done on rope right here:
                > http://www.ropeworks.biz/archive/AwhipV.html

                That method of whipping works, but it's hard to get tight. The way I
                learned -- and which you can find in _Ashley's Book of Knots_ is to
                make a long, narrow loop in the thread at one end about half-again as
                long as the diameter of the cord, and lay it along the cord where you
                want the whipping to go. Then, holding the two ends of the loop down,
                you start wrapping (whipping) the cord tightly, just as the animation
                above shows, until you've whipped about the same length as the
                diameter of the cord. Then you put the end of the thread through the
                loop sticking out from under the whipping, hold it tight, and pull on
                the other end of the thread (which is sticking out from under the
                whipping on the other end); this pulls a loop of the end you stuck
                through the loop under the whipping, where the tight whipping will
                hold both ends in place. Then you cut off the ends close to the whipping.
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.