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How do you "scale up" patterns?

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  • Jason
    I m wanting to make a pair of hakama, and I am using Sengoku Daimyo s pattern. My material is 60 wide. Should I just cut it as his pattern shows (at 45 ),
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 29, 2005
      I'm wanting to make a pair of hakama, and I am using Sengoku Daimyo's
      pattern. My material is 60" wide. Should I just cut it as his
      pattern shows (at 45"), or should I "scale up"? If I should scale up,
      how should I go about doing this? In other words, which numbers need
      to be increased? Obviously not the length or the length of the "door
      knob catchers". Should the position of the crotch slit from the edges
      of the pattern be adjusted? Do I need to adjust the number and/or
      depth of pleats? Thank you very much.

      Jason
    • John Doe
      Jason-San, Best advice go to www.folkwear.com they have patern for hakama they have the same thing and what your measurements are and then you follow them and
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 29, 2005
        Jason-San,


        Best advice go to www.folkwear.com they have patern for hakama they have the same thing
        and what your measurements are and then you follow them and it will come out great.
        if you like to use Kinran orimono then try this site it is www.kinran-marukin.co.jp they have dozens of fabric that you may like. even for hitatare.

        Domo Arigato Gozaimasu!!
        Joey

        Jason <jasdel@...> wrote:
        I'm wanting to make a pair of hakama, and I am using Sengoku Daimyo's
        pattern. My material is 60" wide. Should I just cut it as his
        pattern shows (at 45"), or should I "scale up"? If I should scale up,
        how should I go about doing this? In other words, which numbers need
        to be increased? Obviously not the length or the length of the "door
        knob catchers". Should the position of the crotch slit from the edges
        of the pattern be adjusted? Do I need to adjust the number and/or
        depth of pleats? Thank you very much.

        Jason





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      • nostrand@acm.org
        Noble Cousin! ... Why are you recommending a pattern which is advertised as being Edo period, and claiming that it is best advice ? While the kamishimo
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 30, 2005
          Noble Cousin!

          Greetings from Solveig! You wrote:
          > Best advice go to www.folkwear.com they have patern for hakama they have the same thing
          >and what your measurements are and then you follow them and it will come out great.
          >if you like to use Kinran orimono then try this site it is www.kinran-marukin.co.jp they have dozens of fabric
          >that you may like. even for hitatare.

          Why are you recommending a pattern which is advertised as being Edo period, and claiming that it is "best advice"?
          While the kamishimo pattern is an improvement over using the Folkwear fieldwear pattern, neither is particularly
          period. Arguably, the kamishimo first appeared during the late sixteenth century, so it just barely makes it.

          As for scaling patterns, there are four well known techniques:

          1. Use a pantograph.
          2. Use a projector to cast the image on a wall and trace.
          3. Divide the original into sections and the target into sections for ease of free hand enlargement.
          4. Use a xerox machine.

          Your Humble Servant
          Solveig Throndardottir
          Amateur Scholar
        • Otagiri Tatsuzou
          ... To scale a pattern means to make the whole thing larger or smaller to fit someone who is larger or smaller. The term you are looking for is layout. As
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 30, 2005
            > I'm wanting to make a pair of hakama, and I am using Sengoku Daimyo's
            > pattern. My material is 60" wide. Should I just cut it as his
            > pattern shows (at 45"), or should I "scale up"?


            To 'scale' a pattern means to make the whole thing larger or smaller
            to fit someone who is larger or smaller.

            The term you are looking for is 'layout.' As in: how do I layout the
            pattern on 60" material as opposed to 45" material? The easy way would
            be to just cut the material down to 45" inches. You can probably use
            some of the 15" remnants in making the hakama ties.

            Hope this helps.

            Otagiri Tatsuzou
          • Donald Luby
            ... I don t know Effingham s hakama pattern off the top of my head, but my patterns (http://www.dementia.org/~djl/sca/japanese/patterns.html) all have you
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 2, 2005
              On Oct 29, 2005, at 10:35 PM, Jason wrote:

              > I'm wanting to make a pair of hakama, and I am using Sengoku Daimyo's
              > pattern. My material is 60" wide. Should I just cut it as his
              > pattern shows (at 45"), or should I "scale up"? If I should scale up,
              > how should I go about doing this? In other words, which numbers need
              > to be increased? Obviously not the length or the length of the "door
              > knob catchers". Should the position of the crotch slit from the edges
              > of the pattern be adjusted? Do I need to adjust the number and/or
              > depth of pleats? Thank you very much.

              I don't know Effingham's hakama pattern off the top of my head, but my
              patterns (http://www.dementia.org/~djl/sca/japanese/patterns.html) all
              have you first cut the fabric into ~15" strips, so scaling that way is
              a lot easier.


              > Jason


              Sir Koredono
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