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Online Digital Library

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  • Otagiri Tatsuzou
    Unfortunately I am still illiterate, but I pass these on for those who may find some use for them. There is an online library of scanned books including
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 4, 2005
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    • Caroline Foster
      ... Good gentles, here so gathered: As I find formal introductions awkward, I will seize on this moment to de-lurk and, hopefully, further contribute to a line
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 4, 2005
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        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Otagiri Tatsuzou" <ronbroberg@y...>
        wrote:
        > There is an online library of scanned books including several period
        > pieces.
        > http://kotodama.kokugakuin.ac.jp/digital/diglib/diglib.html

        Good gentles, here so gathered:

        As I find formal introductions awkward, I will seize on this moment to
        de-lurk and, hopefully, further contribute to a line of inquiry
        started here by Otagiri-dono.

        I am sure this is an oft travelled realm for many, but for those who
        may have not had the pleasure of visitation, I present the Japanese e-
        texts home page, University of Virginia:

        http://etext.virginia.edu/japanese/texts.html

        It's certainly less expensive than acquiring the scrolls! ;).

        May all beings be calm,
      • Anthony Bryant
        ... A copy of a post I made to Tousando, in case anyone doesn t go there: Horii kurappu! Hummana hummana hummana.... Woof.
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 4, 2005
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          Otagiri Tatsuzou wrote:

          > Unfortunately I am still illiterate, but I pass these on for those who
          > may find some use for them.
          >
          > There is an online library of scanned books including several period
          > pieces.
          > http://kotodama.kokugakuin.ac.jp/digital/diglib/diglib.html


          A copy of a post I made to Tousando, in case anyone doesn't go there:

          <japanese accent>Horii kurappu! </japanese accent>

          Hummana hummana hummana.... Woof. Wow.

          Muchos arigatos! This is fanfreakingtastic.

          For those who want more cool stuff, The second one down on the home
          pager are some "Nara e-hon" (lit. "Nara picture books" -- so called
          because it was believed that many many many were produced by monks in
          Nara in much the same function and reason that monks in Belgium make
          beer). They started appearing in the 1400s and lasted into the Edo
          period, and were popular tales and texts and were usually heavily
          illustrated and gloriously colored and gold leafed (hence the name
          "picture book"). They are considered direct forerunners to modern manga.

          Many of the tales were what is called "otogizoshi" or "companion tales"
          and are the Japanese equivalent of our Brothers Grimm, fairy tales, etc.
          The story I translated for my thesis was one such: "Iwaya no Sôshi" (The
          Tale of the Cave-house).

          At any rate, the first entry under Nara e-hon is a luxuriously
          illustrated 3-volume edition of Ise Monogatari, which should not need
          any introduction.
          Number two is the 2-volume "Isosaki" (less well known, but illustrated
          to all get out).
          Number three is the incredibly famous and well known tale (or at least
          one version of it) of "Shutendoji" in a LOVELY scroll.
          Number four is a two-volume edition of Daishikikan.
          Number five is "Taketori Monogatari" -- possibly the oldest extant tale
          in Japanese. "Taketori Monogatari" is the story of a girl found in a
          bamboo stalk and raised by an old bamboo cutter, and the nobles who vie
          for her hand and the moon folk (!) who get in the way.
          Number six is "Monokusa Tarô".

          FOLDER THREE
          The third numbered main folder is "literature-related" texts. It breaks
          down into five folders:

          1. Waka (which looks to include almost all the official anthologies of
          waka compiled!)

          2. "monogatari" related texts:
          A. "Gikeiki" (Chronicles of Yoshitsune);
          B. "Saigoro Monogatari";
          C. "Soga Monogatari" (aka. "Tale of the Soga Brothers");
          D. "Taiheiki" (Chronicles of the establishment of the Muromachi Bakufu);
          E. "Taketori Monogatari";
          F. "Heike Monogatari"
          (actually, the rest are all Heike -- just different editions of it, for
          overkill. ).

          3. Nikki (diaries) Ogod ogod ogod NIKKI!!!!!!! Alas, there's only one
          but it's a good one: "Kagero Nikki" ("The Gossamer Years" aka "Fujiwara
          no Michitsuna's old mom won't stop bitching and moaning someone shoot me
          for the love of God").

          4. "fragments of old works, etc." which is exactly what it says --
          random surviving pages of old texts.

          5. Kanbun texts (texts in Classical Chinese via Japanese). The only
          kanbun text is a rather short work by Emperor Saga, the 8th-9th c.
          emperor who was a major Chinese scholar and poet (and possibly the first
          Japanese person to drink tea).

          FOLDER FOUR
          The fourth numbered folder is history texts.
          1. Kojiki
          2. "Age of the Gods"
          3. Nihon Shoki's "Age of the Gods"
          4 - 8. Nihon Shoki editions
          9. "Wakan Nendai ki" (apparently some kind of Chinese-and-Japanese
          historical record)

          FOLDER FIVE
          The fifth numbered folder is topographical texts
          1. "Izumo no kuni no fudo ki" (topographical record of the province of
          Izumo)
          2. "Izumo no fudo ki" (another version)
          3. "Fudo ki: Yamashiro, Owari, Hitachi"

          FOLDER SIX
          The sixth numbered folder is "budo-related" texts.
          1. A Yoshida-ryu kyudo text (nice illustrations of quivers and arrow
          stands!)
          2. Another yoshida-ryu book on archery. Most of it is illustrated with
          diagrams of feathers -- probably detailed instructions on appropriate
          plumage to use for fletching and proprieties of style and rank.

          FOLDER SEVEN
          The seventh numbered folder is martial topics (heiho) related texts. The
          only text there is the two-volume "Zappyo Monogatari" (Tales of the Rank
          and File warrior") , an Edo-era manual for samurai on what samurai USED
          to do. Nicely illustrated. (If you see page
          http://kotodama.kokugakuin.ac.jp/digital/diglib/zohyo02/mag3/pages/page017.html
          you'll see the original inspiration for Angus' painting -- plate G-- in
          my first book.)

          FOLDER EIGHT
          The eighth numbered folder is texts related to governance. The only text
          is "Shokugensho" by Kitabatake Chikafusa. Essentially, how proper
          society should function harrumph harrumph.

          FOLDER NINE
          the ninth numbered folder is Japanese publications of Chinese classics.
          1. Chen Gui
          2. Di Fan

          FOLDER TEN
          The tenth numbered folder is a selection of books from a single
          publisher in Edo.
          1. Ansei Yonnen Owari Han (probably a record of what was going on in
          Owari during the critical years of the Great Ansei Purge).
          2 - 3. Ito Nikki.
          4. An illustrated book about Kasuga Grand Shrine events
          5. Gion Roryôe (a mid-18th century best seller!) about what later came
          to be known as the Gion Matsuri.
          6. I haven't the foggiest idea -- a bakumatsu text of some kind.
          7. Dai Nippon Shinto Himitsu no maki -- shinto tales? Nice B&W
          illustrations, anyway.
          8. Tsukizuki no asobi ("pastimes month by month") Lovingly and
          colorfully illustrated. Wow!
          9. Nihon Meizan Zuso ("Famous Mountains of Japan, Illustrated")
          10. Bansen zue ("Illustrations of [foreign]barbarian ships") See
          http://kotodama.kokugakuin.ac.jp/digital/diglib/bansen/mag3/pages/page009.html.
          Ummmm.... okay.
          11. Meireki Yonnen Bukan ("Armorial Book of Meireki 4 [1658])") The mon
          and holdings of the great families in mid 17th century.
          12. Ryukyu Nenpyo ki (Okinawa yearly chronicles). Interesting.

          FOLDER ELEVEN
          The eleventh numbered folder has "Koga-ke monjo" texts. These are
          documents (mostly letters) from the Koga family from Heian through Meiji
          eras -- usually related to the imperial court. There are two sets of
          facsimiles of documents:
          1. Emps. Fushimi and Go-Fushimi
          2. apparently poetry and commentary by Fushimi (with split screen so you
          can actually READ that scrawl on the large pages).

          FOLDER TWELVE
          Tje twelfth numbered folder is Buddhist texts, and has one entry: a copy
          of the Kokera-kyô ("Persimmon" sutra) written on bamboo strips (!).

          FOLDER THIRTEEN
          The thirteenth numbered folder has one one short text: a handful of
          documents (monjo) from Kôzan-ji.

          FOLDER FOURTEEN
          The fourteenth numbered folder is a collection of two documents from a
          private collection. THere are two sets -- one of 13 pieces, and one of
          51. Foreign stuff. Yawn.

          Effingham
        • wodeford
          ... All the cool kids hang out on the Tousando. It s a nice resource. http://tousando.proboards18.com/index.cgi Saionji
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 4, 2005
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            --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Bryant <anthony_bryant@c...>
            wrote:
            > A copy of a post I made to Tousando, in case anyone doesn't go there:

            All the "cool kids" hang out on the Tousando. It's a nice resource.

            http://tousando.proboards18.com/index.cgi

            Saionji
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