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Re: [SCA-JML] T on T Assassination Game - Question to Eff, Solveig, and others

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  • Solveig Throndardottir
    Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! This business about switching sides is so solidly part of Japanese military thinking that it is a rule in shogi. However,
    Message 1 of 33 , Sep 30, 2005
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      Noble Cousin!

      Greetings from Solveig! This business about switching sides is so
      solidly part of Japanese military thinking that it is a rule in shogi.
      However, this is not at all the same sort of thing as assassination and
      is not necessarily viewed as treacherous. Incidentally, switching sides
      and sitting out battles is far from being unique to Japan. Napoleon's
      generals did it to him. Regardless, to get a better feel about this
      switching sides business, I suggest reading two books. "Taiko" and "The
      Chrysanthemum and the Sword". This rather fundamental difference of
      thinking about surrendered and captured troops can explain a fair
      amount of some of the otherwise odd appearing stuff that went on in the
      Pacific Theatre of WW-II. It turns out that the character "Fuji" in
      McAles Navy is not as far off the mark as you might at first think. If
      you want a more detailed story about the attitudes of Japanese
      prisoners of war, there is an autobiographical account of the Japanese
      POW mutiny in Australia.

      Your Humble Servant
      Solveig Throndardottir
      Amateur Scholar

      +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
      | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS, Fleur |
      | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
      | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:Solveig@... |
      +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
      | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
      | the trash by my email filters. |
      +----------------------------------------------------------------------+


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Solveig Throndardottir
      Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! This business about switching sides is so solidly part of Japanese military thinking that it is a rule in shogi. However,
      Message 33 of 33 , Sep 30, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Noble Cousin!

        Greetings from Solveig! This business about switching sides is so
        solidly part of Japanese military thinking that it is a rule in shogi.
        However, this is not at all the same sort of thing as assassination and
        is not necessarily viewed as treacherous. Incidentally, switching sides
        and sitting out battles is far from being unique to Japan. Napoleon's
        generals did it to him. Regardless, to get a better feel about this
        switching sides business, I suggest reading two books. "Taiko" and "The
        Chrysanthemum and the Sword". This rather fundamental difference of
        thinking about surrendered and captured troops can explain a fair
        amount of some of the otherwise odd appearing stuff that went on in the
        Pacific Theatre of WW-II. It turns out that the character "Fuji" in
        McAles Navy is not as far off the mark as you might at first think. If
        you want a more detailed story about the attitudes of Japanese
        prisoners of war, there is an autobiographical account of the Japanese
        POW mutiny in Australia.

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar

        +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
        | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS, Fleur |
        | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
        | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:Solveig@... |
        +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
        | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
        | the trash by my email filters. |
        +----------------------------------------------------------------------+


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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