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hitatare question

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  • Mara
    I would like to make and decorate a hitatare and I have a few specific questions. I have seen overall patterns and one back centered pattern with silk painting
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 27, 2005
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      I would like to make and decorate a hitatare and I have a few specific
      questions.
      I have seen overall patterns and one back centered pattern with silk
      painting and embroidery on various "jacket" type of Japanese garb,
      does anyone know of sites or books that would show patterns in SCA's
      time line? Does anyone have any information of something along the
      lines of batik work being done in Japan in this time line as well?
      Have you done something similiar, decorate a Japanese garment, that
      you could share? I remember seeing the stencil work done by one member
      of the group and thought there have to be more examples to inspire us.
    • wodeford
      ... http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/garb/garb.html Check both the Men s Garments and Men s outfits sections. http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/garb/garb.html shows
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 27, 2005
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        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Mara" <mnv@v...> wrote:
        > I would like to make and decorate a hitatare and I have a few specific
        > questions.

        > I have seen overall patterns and one back centered pattern with silk
        > painting and embroidery on various "jacket" type of Japanese garb,
        > does anyone know of sites or books that would show patterns in SCA's
        > time line?

        http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/garb/garb.html Check both the "Men's
        Garments" and "Men's outfits" sections.
        http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/garb/garb.html shows a very Heian looking
        hitatare. As a matter of fact, MY assignment for this week is to cut a
        stencil to do this to some screaming orange and red shot silk that's
        insisting it wants to be a hitatare.

        http://www.geocities.com/wodeford/samurai/htm has some pictures of a
        kataginu kamishimo that Ii Saburou Katsumori did some painting on -
        different garment, I know, but the style is a decent example of what
        would be appropriate for the 16th century.

        Have you been to this site yet? Not only are there images of
        mannequins in various period costumes, but there's a textile gallery
        that is extremely good.
        http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/

        > Does anyone have any information of something along the
        > lines of batik work being done in Japan in this time line as well?

        http://www.kougei.or.jp/english/dyeing.html discusses Japanese resist
        dyeing techniques. Yuzen, as far as I can determine, post-dates SCA
        period. Rice paste resists and stencils, however, might be used.
        Shibori is tie dye for the obsessive compulsive.

        > I remember seeing the stencil work done by one member
        > of the group and thought there have to be more examples to inspire
        > us.

        That would be me. For those who don't know what we're talking about,
        it's at http://www.geocities.com/wodeford/fakingit.htm

        http://www.geocities.com/gurdymonkey/blank_slate.htm and http:
        www.geocities.com/sneak1.jpg show some home decor stenciling I just
        did to make this weird attic space a little weirder.

        http://www.otomiya.com/kamon/index.htm is in Japanese, however, don't
        let that intimidate you. Let the sheer number of design motifs inside
        it intimidate you! Anyway, you may find something here that might
        adapt well as a stencil.

        Feel free to contact me if you want to brainstorm.

        Saionji no Hanae, called Makiwara
      • Mara
        ... I would actually like to do something that is a little more freeform or organic maybe even called abstract by some, on the fabric. Do you know of an period
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 3, 2005
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          --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "wodeford" <wodeford@y...> wrote:
          >
          > Feel free to contact me if you want to brainstorm.
          >
          > Saionji no Hanae, called Makiwara

          I would actually like to do something that is a little more freeform
          or organic maybe even called abstract by some, on the fabric.
          Do you know of an period images that would show something like that?
          Everything I have found so far is so formal, which I know typical
          given the formal nature of Japanese court at the time, but I would
          love to know if I am missing something.
        • wodeford
          ... It depends on the period. I m doing the sort of thing that would be appropriate for a Heian or Kamakura period courtier. By the 16th century, styles worn
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 3, 2005
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            --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "Mara" <mnv@v...> wrote:
            > --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "wodeford" <wodeford@y...> wrote:
            >
            > I would actually like to do something that is a little more freeform
            > or organic maybe even called abstract by some, on the fabric.
            > Do you know of an period images that would show something like that?
            > Everything I have found so far is so formal, which I know typical
            > given the formal nature of Japanese court at the time, but I would
            > love to know if I am missing something.

            It depends on the period. I'm doing the sort of thing that would be
            appropriate for a Heian or Kamakura period courtier. By the 16th
            century, styles worn by the samurai class are quite different.

            Rent "Kagemusha" and ogle the costumes. Lots of men in really snazzy
            16th century hitatare.

            I'll take a look through my stuff when I get home and see if I can
            point you at anything else.

            Saionji
          • wodeford
            ... Mara-hime, Crap. I suddenly can t seem to link to the Tokyo National Museum s website for some reason, not sure if it s my ISP or if they re working on
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 3, 2005
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              --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "wodeford" <wodeford@y...> wrote:

              > It depends on the period. I'm doing the sort of thing that would be
              > appropriate for a Heian or Kamakura period courtier. By the 16th
              > century, styles worn by the samurai class are quite different.

              Mara-hime,
              Crap. I suddenly can't seem to link to the Tokyo National Museum's
              website for some reason, not sure if it's my ISP or if they're working
              on their end.

              Anyway, if YOU can navigate into www.tnm.go.jp/ and get into the
              English language version, go to the TNM Collection, select "Decorative
              Arts" + "Textiles" and I think the first five or six garments in the
              collection are pre 1600. Look for one with diagonal stripes and
              abstract ginko leaves and see whether it fits the "freeform and
              abstract" feel you're looking for.

              Here's something from the Kyoto Costume Museum that's kind of fun:
              http://tinyurl.com/8fmmb

              Some hitatare images from artwork:
              http://www.kariginu.jp/kikata/1-6.htm

              Saionji


              >
              > Rent "Kagemusha" and ogle the costumes. Lots of men in really snazzy
              > 16th century hitatare.
              >
              > I'll take a look through my stuff when I get home and see if I can
              > point you at anything else.
              >
              > Saionji
            • Solveig Throndardottir
              Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... About the only thing that I can suggest is a dye pattern achieved by swirling black sumi or dye on the surface of
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 9, 2005
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                Noble Cousin!

                Greetings from Solveig!
                > I would actually like to do something that is a little more freeform
                > or organic maybe even called abstract by some, on the fabric.
                > Do you know of an period images that would show something like that?
                > Everything I have found so far is so formal, which I know typical
                > given the formal nature of Japanese court at the time, but I would
                > love to know if I am missing something.

                About the only thing that I can suggest is a dye pattern achieved by
                swirling black sumi or dye on the surface of water and then pulling the
                cloth through the pattern. This produces a random swirl pattern which
                does appear in the section of fabric pattern plates in Guide to
                Japanese Literature.


                Your Humble Servant
                Solveig Throndardottir
                Amateur Scholar

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